The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 4,931 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Big Bad Wolves
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede (First Sequence)
Score distribution:
4,931 movie reviews
  1. May not offer up any fresh revelations, but this effectively assembled documentary puts it all in valuable, if depressing, perspective.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is both funny and sad, placid and provocative and, above all, hopeful and despairing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Not everyone will wax lyrical about this enigmatic and troubling film, which is also Chan-dong's most slow-moving one. But those with an eye for reading between the lines can find layers of meaning.
  2. Artist evinces unlimited love for the look and ethos of the 1920s as well for the style of the movies. The filmmakers clearly did their homework and took great pleasure in doing so, an enjoyment that is passed along in ample doses to any viewer game for their nifty little conceit.
  3. Not only (Kaufman's) most accessible and romantic screenplay, it's his most complete. The third act works like a charm and pulls all his themes, characters and conflicts together beautifully.
  4. Now Eastwood turns on a dime and tackles not just his first war movie but two war movies of considerable scope and complexity. If he doesn't nail everything perfectly, he nevertheless has created a vivid memorial to the courage on both sides of this battle and created an awareness in the public consciousness at a most opportune moment about how war feels to those lost in its fog.
  5. The film has enormous charm and zero pretense.
  6. Capote represents something unique in cinema.…Most eye-catching for critics and audiences in the weeks to come will be Philip Seymour Hoffman's brilliant metamorphosis into the persona of the late author.
  7. Polished, funny and utterly charming.
  8. Hersonski enriches this evidence by bringing in survivors of the ghetto, who tell stories of life there while watching the film themselves.
  9. Kent and editor Simon Njoo show maturity and trust in their material, expertly building tension through the insidious modulation from naturalistic dysfunctional family drama to all-out boogeyman terror.
  10. '71
    This outstanding, muscular feature debut for French-born, British-based director Yann Demange almost never puts a foot wrong, from the softly underplayed performances to the splendidly speckled cinematography and fine-grained period detailing.
  11. Less concerned with classic storytelling than with creating virtual performance pieces on screen, the film features dozens of extended sequences of Adele and Emma both in and out of bed—scenes that are virtuously acted and directed, even if they run on for longer than most filmmakers would allow.
  12. The pain of watching a spouse succumb to Alzheimer's is given a particularly deep and sensitive treatment in Away From Her.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Most impressively, it makes it understandable to those of us who don't know much at all about economics.
  13. It perhaps started with "The Queen," continued with "Young Victoria" and now achieves the most intimate glimpse inside the royal camp to date with The King's Speech.
  14. Up
    Winsome, touching and arguably the funniest Pixar effort ever, the gorgeously rendered, high-flying adventure is a tidy 90-minute distillation of all the signature touches that came before it.
  15. The picture is fresh and frightening, a strong arthouse contender certain to leave audiences talking.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Mike Leigh has come up with a profound yet simple drama of family life generously leavened with comedy. [14 Oct. 1991]
  16. The film clearly wishes to explore the topic of children having children, but it only inspires a great desire to smack them both.
  17. Constant lateral tracks, push-ins, whip-pans, camera moves timed to dialogue, title cards, chapter headings, miniatures, use of stop-action, fetishization of clothing and props, absurdist predicaments — all the techniques Anderson has honed over the years — are used to pinpoint effect here.
  18. A deliberately distanced but often harrowing vision of a living hell.
  19. Powerful, stripped to its very essence and featuring a spectacular cast (of mostly non-professionals), Matteo Garrone's sixth feature film Gomorra goes beyond Tarrantino's gratuitous violence and even Scorsese's Hollywood sensibility in depicting the everyday reality of organized crime's foot soldiers.
  20. The movie rolls merrily along with slapstick action and whimsical characters.
  21. Redford, who can’t avoid exuding charisma, plays this role with utter naturalism and lack of histrionics or self-regard.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Kikuchi manages to make Kumiko interesting company no matter how far the character recedes into herself, using subtly expressive body language that would have been at home in silent movies to create a very strange self-imposed social outcast.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ultimately, the ending is a bit of a cop-out, but that's a small criticism for a film with such decent perspectives.
  22. Fateless is both haunting and poetic. It also is visually stunning.
  23. Patterns emerge by virtue of repetition.
  24. Arguably the most conventional documentary made by Errol Morris and, perhaps equally surprising, it displays sympathy toward its subject.

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