The Independent (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 1,334 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Behind the Counter with Max Richter
Lowest review score: 20 Violet Cries
Score distribution:
1334 music reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Kouyate's electrification of his ngoni lute is just as effective a sign of resistance: fed through a wah-wah pedal, his serpentine, fleet-fingered lead lines gain a fresh, assertive power on songs.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though frowned on by some purists expecting the traditional fare of the family band The Watersons, the siblings’ original songs were eagerly accompanied by luminaries like Martin Carthy, Richard Thompson and Ashley Hutchings, who bring a roguish enthusiasm to tracks such as “Rubber Band”, on which even the horns seem to have their cap at a jaunty angle.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Throughout there’s a determination to find the appeal in paradox, notably the beguiling blend of cool and cumbersome that carries the love song “Prince Johnny” to another place.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is music of stellar quality, from the smirking masturbation anthem “Low Yo Yo Stuff” to the berserk wizardry of “Big Eyed Beans from Venus.”
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Notionally a five-track EP, M3LL155X is in its fullest realisation an art film/performance (co-directed and co-choreographed by her), freely available on YouTube.... Musically, it’s a more focused, coherent application of the same kinds of sounds and vocals used on LP1.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Though already condemned by Van himself, there's much to appreciate about this 4-CD expanded edition of one of the greatest albums ever recorded. It's fascinating to follow the development of a track such as "Caravan" across half a dozen takes.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Her follow-up to 2013’s sublime Pushin’ Against A Stone finds Valerie June expanding her unique blend of blues, soul and mountain music to create a distinctive hybrid in which past and future coalesce with gentle power.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Save for the chunky “Don’t You Wait”, there’s little punch or pop charm to the album, which boasts a surfeit of luscious textures and feisty attitudes, but a shortfall of killer melodies.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Thoughtful, engaging and utterly contemporary, it’s one of the albums of the year.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As usual with Newsom, the deeper resonances resound louder with subsequent exposure.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An album which contains no filler at all, each track blooming in its own way like a collection of strange desert succulents, with a whole lot of hollerin' and a touch of Lieber-Stollerin'.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Drawing on the embattled, hopeful possibilities of early Seventies soul, rock and folk, its chamber-classical and folk instrumentation allows for pleasure as well as despair. This is a Radiohead album to make you feel, better.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It belongs in that hour when the sunlight dims, everyone leaves the park, the disposable barbecues are smoking abortively, the makeshift Lilt bottle bong's started to taste like shit and you don't know whether to go back to bed or fritter away your last tenner in town.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Killer Mike and El-P bring typically sharp, visceral observations, chugging beats and superb guest artists onto their most successful studio effort to date.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The first line of the first song encapsulates the adolescent angst which blossomed over and over throughout the band's career, with varying degrees of wit, empathy, contempt and self-pity.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Roots' 13th album may be their best.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Songwriter Tim Elsenburg makes great strides forward with an ambitious cycle of songs about identity and history.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s not so much that she’s changed direction completely, as that she’s drained her art of the obfuscating sonic blabber to leave her pop aesthetic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There’s prodigious ambition here, and moments of great pleasure.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    David Bowie releases the most extreme album of his entire career: Blackstar is as far as he's strayed from pop.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [The first three] tracks follow fairly seamlessly on from MBV's previous work, but thereafter subtle changes are applied that tug the album into pastures new.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Less structured and song-oriented than Channel Orange, it’s a long, meandering ramble through Ocean’s passing interests and attitudes, hopes and memories, alighted upon like scenes briefly glimpsed from a train window and then dropped into tracks that aren’t so much sung as delivered in an undulating sprechstimme that seems to be avoiding the difficult choice of a compelling melody.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Southeastern finds him working in a more stripped-down manner which focuses attention firmly on his songs. Fortunately, they're brilliant: vivid, multi-faceted tales of souls adrift.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With the hindsight afforded by this monumental 17-disc career retrospective, he seems somewhat less than The One, an idiosyncratic talent undermined by MOR inclinations.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The chief virtue is the immediacy that courses through tracks like “The Best Ever Death Metal Band in Denton” and “Fall of the Star High School Running Back”.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Bulging with 55 previously unreleased outtakes, Come All Ye is an education, and as entertaining as it gets.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Bjork’s Vulnicura represents a return of sorts to standard song form after the experimental Biophilia, its nine long tracks evoking the emotional confusion following a break-up.... But throughout, Bjork’s own vocals are the stumbling-block.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The determination to include generous dollops of each member’s solo output means that the acoustic set sags badly. But the obscure material is welcome.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like their Discovery LP which laid fresh pathways for pop and dance in 2001, Random Access Memories breathes life into the safe music that dominates today’s charts, with its sheer ambition.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bouger Le Monde offers a celebration of life.