The Independent (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 1,398 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Automatic for the People [25th Anniversary Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 20 Violet Cries
Score distribution:
1398 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Recommended to fans of Michael Chapman, Ryley Walker and Jack Rose.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She’s uniquely gifted--one’s only reservation concerns her inclination to pack everything into each track.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's his band's most musically diverse effort.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Devonté Hynes’ latest outing as Blood Orange takes the soft-soul stylings of 2013’s Cupid Deluxe and mashes them together with African voices and percussion, saxophones and vox populi samples to create a sonic collage that seeks to marry the vision of Marvin Gaye with the methods of Frank Zappa. That’s a considerable ambition, and unsurprisingly it falls well short much of the time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The usual bouts of brusque dissing rub shoulders with love songs, fond tributes to his mom, and a fulsome, swaying devotional hymn “Blinded By Your Grace Pt. 2”. But it’s the engaging sense of vulnerability and self-deprecation that brings depth and charm to Gang Signs & Prayer.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For his final recordings, Allman returned to Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, where gospelly backing vocals and burring horns bring a deep-soul tone and texture not just to a soul standard like “Out Of Left Field” but also to material like “Going, Going, Gone” and the Dead’s “Black Muddy River”.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While there are plenty further examples on the bitterly disillusioned Dark Matter, the most effective songs here are those which pack a more personal emotional punch, echoing the solitary desolation he’s mined throughout his career.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The air of exultant expectation recollected in tranquility pervades the entire album, with Garvey confiding memories and misgivings to the natural world in "The River" and "The Birds", the latter appointed "the keepers of our secrets", while the former ultimately washes them out to the west-facing sea.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever the subject, it’s always conveyed with unexpected charm.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A sweet, joyously transgressive album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Save for the big live band arrangement of Dylan’s “Gotta Serve Somebody” that closes the album, it’s a thoughtful, intimate set.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Talk Talk of their era.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The results have a lingering, languid charm, which does, as he suggests, help to liberate the material from the rusting manacles of big-band and cabaret mannerisms.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The confidence of the performances benefits strong contemporary material dealing with issues from outreach to domestic abuse.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This year's version features the usual relaxed jazz-pop grooves, sophisticated horn arrangements and tinder-dry ironic tone.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An album that perhaps skips too easily from one style to another for its own good, though there are other sublime moments.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The songs on her third album are more concealed in their arrangements than before, despite a sonic palette still based in the slim, austere piano and cello settings for which she’s known.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thankfully, Burn Something Beautiful confirms his own fund of creativity is far from drained, the collaboration with Buck and McCaughey resulting in all three’s best work in years.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    In Jeff Tweedy, singer-songwriter Joan Shelley has surely met her perfect production partner. This, her fourth album, is simply magical.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s nothing particularly Nashville about Jason Isbell’s new album--no cowboy hats or keening steel guitars--but it does possess, in spades, the kind of blue-collar concerns that have traditionally furnished country music’s backbone.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Collins herself brings a demotic charm to whatever she sings.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album slips into a febrile combination of reminiscences, boasts and complaints that manages to keep an eye firmly on the present whilst gazing fondly back on former tribulations.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's an unashamedly middle-aged affair, from the quietly moving affirmation of devotion in "Two Children" to the comforting reverie of "I Remember You".
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Not a party album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The confessional, autobiographical elements that are its strongest aspect also serve as its Achilles' heel: the whole enterprise depends on how fascinated the listener is with Rowland's psyche.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its dark, unflinching songs certainly ponder humanity’s less attractive traits, with arrangements to match.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At its best, Overgrown proves that James Blake doesn't need to listen to anyone's advice. He's doing fine already.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The dazzling deftness of his fingering in the Presto and Double Presto sections evokes a kind of giddy delirium and his feathery technique wrests the tenderest of emotions from the second Sonata's Andante.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Lyrically, there's a pervasive fascination with California outsider culture that soon palls, though the troubled relationship excavated in "Marked" suggests a deeper vein of inspiration may yet be mined.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's an enchanting snapshot of British rock'n'roll at its moment of greatest revelation, the point at which the Tin Pan Alley production line of ersatz Elvises was rendered utterly obsolete.