The New York Times' Scores

For 1,389 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Office (UK): Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Notes from the Underbelly: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 650
  2. Negative: 0 out of 650
650 tv reviews
  1. Rock Center is still a work in progress, so it's hard to judge how it will fare.
  2. Those jokes are supposed to establish Liz’s geek cred, but they mostly serve as speed bumps in the show’s otherwise fast and clever banter.
  3. At least in the early stages, the series is quite entertaining. But over all, the mini-series suffers from defensive storytelling; it's a narrative driven in splintered directions less by inspiration than by avoidance.
  4. It’s reasonably smart, reasonably interesting and reasonably well acted without being particularly good.
  5. An Adventure in Space and Time turns out to be an entirely conventional backstage drama, moving at a leisurely pace and making every reversal and triumph easily comprehensible for an audience that may not have seen the original show.
  6. The Equalizer...recites the Vigilante Creed with effective fervor. And Mr. Woodward, the always accomplished actor whose more recent credits include "A Christmas Carol" on television and the title role in the Australian film "Breaker Morant," is so good that he makes the entire questionable enterprise seem almost reasonable.
  7. The show's jarring shift in tone suggests a touch of the film "Syriana," as well, all of which leaves us with a hard-to-digest influence soup. It's as if a novelist were telling you that she wrote while under the spell of both Salinger and Nancy Drew.
  8. It feels as if the attention that should have gone to the storytelling all went to the atmosphere and the repartee.
  9. The film has some very nice moments, but it also has its share of awkwardness, and the director, the television veteran Roger Young, can’t seem to get his multinational cast on the same page or find a consistent tone.
  10. In the absence of an arcing narrative, the series wants us to accept as its mission of suspense the mystery of this crypto drag-king-meets-shopaholic friendship.
  11. It’s the last of the big-four British costume dramas of recent years to make its American public-television debut, after “Downton Abbey,” “Call the Midwife” and “Mr. Selfridge,” and it’s the most frivolous of the bunch, which is saying quite a bit.
  12. It's well made and also at times unnecessarily cheesy.
  13. The show is based on a small independent film of the same name, which was never terribly daring to begin with. Any sharpness has been smoothed away for television. Mary and her friends talk endlessly about drinking, but never get drunk; they make knowing references to long-ago loss of virginity, but never seem to have sex. Party Girl is as sweetly innocent as "Clueless," the film that seems to provide its true inspiration.
  14. Though the first episode of Mr. Belvedere indicates that the basic format is fertile ground for humor, its creators should beware believing that a benign laugh track means they have been funny.
  15. The problem is more likely to be the generic nature of Emily's misadventures, and the soap opera implausibility of the medical stories, which is extreme, even for the genre.
  16. Eastbound & Down feels static.
  17. It wasn’t a singalong or a sacrilege or a slavish, shameless remake. It was a live performance of a legendary musical that felt muted and a little sad.
  18. The paradox of The Tudors is that it takes on one of the most powerful and protested institutions in human history--the Catholic Church during the Renaissance--and provides little sense of what the English people have to gain or lose by breaking with it.
  19. All of that good early work by the cast explodes in a ball of predictability.
  20. It might not even be around long enough to develop a consistent tone or viewpoint, both of which are lacking in the pilot. But it has a pretty good actress, Anne Heche ("Hung"), at the head of the cast, and it at least tries to add a touch of levity to what has always been a ponderously serious genre.
  21. It is louder, bolder and more lurid than the original, and also more boring.
  22. Initial verdict: clunky.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    [Cooper's] presence [is] almost engaging enough to redeem an overstuffed, overbaked first episode.
  23. "Catfish" was a clever riff on a found-footage thriller, Catfish: The TV Show is a standard reality series mixing elements of the dating and rehab-therapy genres.
  24. The usual stuff of such shows--arguments among team members; a race against the clock--is served up, though here the disagreements are peppered with phrases out of a physics class about kinetic friction, static friction and so on.
  25. For a short-form digital series, Play It Again, Dick is fairly amusing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The show isn't entertaining, exactly — it has none of the wit or style of "Desperate Housewives." But like so much reality TV, it's both educational and grimly fascinating, and leaves you feeling much better about your own life — if for no other reason than that you would never be so stupid as to appear on a show like this.
  26. The writers may work their way out of this corner and Mr. McIntyre, who's a bit lightweight at this point, may grow into the central role. In the meantime there are still touches of the unbridled campiness that made the first season amusing.
  27. The models themselves are incidental on Scouted, merely empty planets around which revolve some fascinating characters and plenty more dull ones.
  28. The challenges are too outsize and the format is too confusing to take full advantage of the gimmick.

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