The New York Times' Scores

For 1,493 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Office (UK): Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Notes from the Underbelly: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 702
  2. Negative: 0 out of 702
702 tv reviews
  1. Quirky, so obsessed with the process of taking an idea to market, overlooks the process of building a successful television narrative.
  2. The show’s value, if any, is in demonstrating the different styles used by the principals: tough, tender and so on. The show’s drawback is that it suggests that all principals do is administer discipline. For that, the show’s creators need a spanking.
  3. This glossy tribute is enjoyable; it is just not memorable.
  4. Some of the jokes are amusing, but the show is a traditional sitcom that looks slightly dated.
  5. The comedy in the show is a grab bag, sometimes subtle, sometimes self-consciously outlandish.
  6. It’s an engrossing but somewhat aimless and impressionistic ramble through the Nixon presidency and tumult of the 1970s. At times it leans too heavily on artistic license.
  7. Fear Itself, which is directed by a platoon of horror film veterans (including the Hong Kong auteur Ronny Yu), delivers a lot of ripped flesh and spilled blood--terrible things happen, in particular, to lips and teeth--in the service of very little terror or discomfort.
  8. "In Case of Emergency" is uneven, more antic than witty.
  9. It’s not an embarrassment for the channel, but it doesn’t raise the stakes either.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nobody cusses, nobody copulates, nobody sweats, and hardly anybody bleeds. The only dramatic tension surrounds the question of whether Joe's true identity will be discovered. But in that case, he'd be whacked, and the show would be over.
  10. Current TV turns out to be less serious than one would have predicted, and in some sense 4th and Forever might have benefited from some of the aura of earnestness that used to surround Mr. Gore before he took to making uncannily great guest appearances on enterprises like "30 Rock."
  11. TV Land proves again that no one in basic cable does a more proficient, professional job of executing and packaging traditional sitcoms. What’s not so admirable: the creator and writer Matthew Carlson’s pilot script.
  12. Prime-time game shows like “1 vs 100,” which begins tonight on NBC, are not a test of a contestant’s erudition or nerve; they are aspirational reality shows that allow ordinary Joes to go for it all in the hope of transforming their lives.
  13. It offers the minor pleasures of formulaic fantasy and weekly puzzle solving, though in a cheaper-looking and less original package than usual.
  14. It feels cobbled together, from the premise of “Chuck,” “Jake 2.0” and other shows to scenes and situations that recall better productions like “Person of Interest,” “Homeland” and “Raiders of the Lost Ark.”
  15. Sirens stands at the far end of a current spectrum in which jokes are considered too obvious and old-fashioned a way of getting laughs. Unfortunately, the show doesn’t replace them with funny circumstances or characters we care about.
  16. Mr. Dean is appealing as Nate and Mr. Sheridan is amusing as Dove, but the tone of the series is uneven.
  17. The banter between the Blooms is so full of cloying sugar substitutes and so devoid of any real tension that there is no voyeuristic thrill to be had even from their--I'm just going to say it, because the show does--"sexpionage."
  18. At this point, everything about it feels generic.
  19. Accidentally on Purpose, with its matching sets of friends for Billie and Zack, its bland jokes, its lack of any sort of topicality, its Jenna Elfman, feels as if it could have been on any time in the last two decades.
  20. Much of the time in the early episodes is spent on the preparations for this mission [for one last big score] and on laying out a complicated network of alliances and animosities, and it gets to be a slog. Helping to keep us interested are Mark Ryan, providing a comic touch as a grizzled quartermaster, and Luke Arnold as a not-so-charming rogue named John Silver, not yet Long.
  21. The semi-improvised Z Rock has its moments, none of which can be described adequately here.
  22. Each warrior is given equal time and the evidence is piled up on both sides to maximize the suspense around the weekly suspect's guilt or innocence. But the personality cost is too high for the payoff.
  23. No one appearing on Melrose Place 2.0 is nearly that dreadful, and the one-liners that remind us that we are not watching the television of a historic golden age retain the zesty camp of the series’s first iteration.
  24. Across the four early episodes provided for review, Pierce's hallucinations are already beginning to feel like stunts covering up for a lack of ideas.
  25. Ms. Greer and Mr. Faxon are talented comedians, but the writing isn’t quite up to their abilities.... The show improves when Russ leaves the house and hangs out with his bitter, profane best friends.
  26. [Coma] is sometimes entertaining, sometimes infuriating.
  27. Peter Sagal begins Constitution USA, his four-part exploration of the founding American document, with look-at-me gimmicks that are more annoying than enlightening, but the series grows more substantive as it goes along.
  28. Don’t look for the depth of “House,” “Grey’s Anatomy” or other top-flight medical dramas here. But if preposterous, pulse-pounding pileups of bizarre accidents and obscure medical conditions appeal to you, sure, put the trashy beach novel aside and help yourself.
  29. The premise of You’re the Worst is amusing, but the lines don’t match it. Once Gretchen and Jimmy get out of bed and back to their lives--he’s a writer, she’s a publicist--You’re the Worst gets a little better.

Top Trailers