The New York Times' Scores

For 1,283 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Office (UK): Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Notes from the Underbelly: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 594
  2. Negative: 0 out of 594
594 tv reviews
  1. There is some archness in Killer Women--the opening scene looks like a Robert Palmer music video from the 1980s--but no real humor and still less suspense.
  2. Looking has a premium-cable mandate to be daring, and is indeed sexually unbound. But almost everything else, including dialogue, plotting and humor, is muffled.
  3. The mini-series and its characters are all over the map, stylistically, seeming unable to find the right tone for the time period.
  4. Both the summer movie and Tuesday’s premiere feature plot points so severe and odd that they destabilize the show’s narrative.
  5. Much of the time in the early episodes is spent on the preparations for this mission [for one last big score] and on laying out a complicated network of alliances and animosities, and it gets to be a slog. Helping to keep us interested are Mark Ryan, providing a comic touch as a grizzled quartermaster, and Luke Arnold as a not-so-charming rogue named John Silver, not yet Long.
  6. Mr. Romney is likable in this depiction. But little in Mitt suggests that he is also electable.
  7. Mr. Fallon is a charming and gifted comedian who on his first night chose to be subdued and at times even serious. That said as much about the uncertain future of Tonight as it did about its new host.
  8. At least the Sopranos knew how to have fun.... Mr. Momoa and Mr. Henderson acquit themselves well without generating any heat or much of any feeling. The best work is by Julianne Nicholson as Harold’s damaged wife and Zahn McClarnon as a foot soldier in Phillip’s drug operation.
  9. Sirens stands at the far end of a current spectrum in which jokes are considered too obvious and old-fashioned a way of getting laughs. Unfortunately, the show doesn’t replace them with funny circumstances or characters we care about.
  10. The characters don’t live up to the swirling, often violent action that surrounds them.
  11. The new show about another troubled city and its leader looks more like an ad campaign than a documentary.
  12. Don’t look for the depth of “House,” “Grey’s Anatomy” or other top-flight medical dramas here. But if preposterous, pulse-pounding pileups of bizarre accidents and obscure medical conditions appeal to you, sure, put the trashy beach novel aside and help yourself.
  13. The show is based on a small independent film of the same name, which was never terribly daring to begin with. Any sharpness has been smoothed away for television. Mary and her friends talk endlessly about drinking, but never get drunk; they make knowing references to long-ago loss of virginity, but never seem to have sex. Party Girl is as sweetly innocent as "Clueless," the film that seems to provide its true inspiration.
  14. The show turns into a case study in how not to be subtle. It has a reasonable point to make--next to a cancer diagnosis, a lot of life seems trivial--but makes it over and over again.
  15. TV Land proves again that no one in basic cable does a more proficient, professional job of executing and packaging traditional sitcoms. What’s not so admirable: the creator and writer Matthew Carlson’s pilot script.
  16. When Dominion isn’t preoccupied with filling in its portentous back story, it provides some capably filmed action and a higher grade of acting than usual for this kind of show.
  17. It has more of the feel of a traditional family sitcom than the louder, jokier competition on Nickelodeon, but the humor is still pretty broad and the plotting blunt for anyone outside that age group.
  18. The shortcoming of NY Med isn’t Dr. Oz (who is not around much in the early episodes); it’s that the program doesn’t trust its own best vignettes, lingering too long on emotions that speak for themselves, tarting up inherently powerful moments with syrupy music.
  19. The Bridge still feels like a show caught between two masters. It has a lot of the pieces it needs to actually be a compelling murder mystery--some good performances in key roles; an evocative, sun-blasted look; and an ability (presumably Mr. Reid’s) to concoct creepy, suspenseful scenes. Yet we’re still waiting for it all to come together.
  20. Ms. Greer and Mr. Faxon are talented comedians, but the writing isn’t quite up to their abilities.... The show improves when Russ leaves the house and hangs out with his bitter, profane best friends.
  21. The premise of You’re the Worst is amusing, but the lines don’t match it. Once Gretchen and Jimmy get out of bed and back to their lives--he’s a writer, she’s a publicist--You’re the Worst gets a little better.
  22. The plotlines here--a fund-raiser for a charity that provides high-heel shoes for dogs occupies the first episode--are kind of amusing, but in general the show looks as if it were far more fun to make than it is to watch.
  23. Sharknado 2 intends to be nothing more than dumb fun, and it succeeds well enough at that. But it also leaves you regretting that the Sharknado team (Anthony C. Ferrante again directed from a script by Thunder Levin) didn’t reach for camp greatness.
  24. The entire season will be available on Friday morning, and, in one sitting, you can cruise through the so-so story and find out before lunch what the future holds for Linden and Holder.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nobody cusses, nobody copulates, nobody sweats, and hardly anybody bleeds. The only dramatic tension surrounds the question of whether Joe's true identity will be discovered. But in that case, he'd be whacked, and the show would be over.
  25. While The Fugitive is the most high-profile of the CBS crime series, it is also the most lackluster, mostly because Tim Daly is a lightweight Kimble. [6 Oct 2000, p.E1]
  26. The District will either have to ignore race and lapse into television fantasyland or embrace its realism and become more sophisticated. (A tiresome political correctness would be worst of all. ) Either way, it's halfway there. [6 Oct 2000, p.E1]
  27. "Just Shoot Me" does score passing comic points, but all too seldom. [4 Mar 1997]
  28. That still makes the series more daring than most of what's on television; the problem is, its creators know that and the show's self-satisfaction becomes annoying. The floundering first episode (the only one available for preview) is sometimes smart, sometimes stupid, eventually gooey and, despite its sharp cast, not often entertaining. One of the season's most hyped and anticipated series, The West Wing is by far its biggest disappointment.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The performers are pleasant enough, and Ms. Remini almost gives Carrie some zing. But they can't overcome the stale setup.

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