The New York Times' Scores

For 1,414 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Gideon's Crossing: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Notes from the Underbelly: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 663
  2. Negative: 0 out of 663
663 tv reviews
  1. Quite a number of rats buy the farm, or whatever it is that rats buy, at the hands of the Magic men in the opening episode. But these two guys are not telegenic or charismatic enough to make rodent removal interesting.
  2. Reign looks good (the pilot was shot in Ireland), moves smoothly and features CW’s characteristic bland but competent performances.
  3. The characters don’t live up to the swirling, often violent action that surrounds them.
  4. What is obvious to viewers after only a few minutes is not obvious to the supposedly crack investigators dispatched to untangle the conspiracy, whose Ludlumesque layers they fail to see.
  5. The World According to Dick Cheney has interesting insights and revealing moments, but for critics who long to confront Mr. Cheney it may prove dissatisfying, because it allows him to make astonishing assertions without direct contradiction or follow-up questions.
  6. Mr. Danson has some funny moments, but he is not as comfortable in a comic genre where deadpan takes the place of punch line.
  7. The gore is plentiful, the tone is inconsistent, and by the end only one thing is undeniably clear: Mockingbird Lane is a very different creature from "The Munsters."
  8. It may be too much a celebration of Rev Run's normalcy to be all that intriguing.
  9. Hello Ladies is a diverting curiosity, nice to look at and good for a few squirmy laughs.
  10. The malaria story, it seems to say, is filmable only if the central figures are white and it is larded up with the kind of button-pushing that television dramas thrive on.... But the scenes in which the two actresses are together have some real power.
  11. Sharknado 2 intends to be nothing more than dumb fun, and it succeeds well enough at that. But it also leaves you regretting that the Sharknado team (Anthony C. Ferrante again directed from a script by Thunder Levin) didn’t reach for camp greatness.
  12. Leverage winds up seeming merely anachronistic, wrapping up with a cute resolution each week, the swine in handcuffs, not torn from the private hockey rinks of their Aspen vacation homes.
  13. As to whether the show will get back on track, the early signals are mixed.
  14. "The Unit" becomes distinctive only when the action shifts back to the wives left behind on the base.
  15. The scripts are efficient. The acting is decent. But you're likely to find yourself just waiting for the familiar crises and character complications to come along, and sure enough, they do.
  16. Rock Center is still a work in progress, so it's hard to judge how it will fare.
  17. Those jokes are supposed to establish Liz’s geek cred, but they mostly serve as speed bumps in the show’s otherwise fast and clever banter.
  18. At least in the early stages, the series is quite entertaining. But over all, the mini-series suffers from defensive storytelling; it's a narrative driven in splintered directions less by inspiration than by avoidance.
  19. It’s reasonably smart, reasonably interesting and reasonably well acted without being particularly good.
  20. An Adventure in Space and Time turns out to be an entirely conventional backstage drama, moving at a leisurely pace and making every reversal and triumph easily comprehensible for an audience that may not have seen the original show.
  21. The Equalizer...recites the Vigilante Creed with effective fervor. And Mr. Woodward, the always accomplished actor whose more recent credits include "A Christmas Carol" on television and the title role in the Australian film "Breaker Morant," is so good that he makes the entire questionable enterprise seem almost reasonable.
  22. The show's jarring shift in tone suggests a touch of the film "Syriana," as well, all of which leaves us with a hard-to-digest influence soup. It's as if a novelist were telling you that she wrote while under the spell of both Salinger and Nancy Drew.
  23. It feels as if the attention that should have gone to the storytelling all went to the atmosphere and the repartee.
  24. The film has some very nice moments, but it also has its share of awkwardness, and the director, the television veteran Roger Young, can’t seem to get his multinational cast on the same page or find a consistent tone.
  25. In the absence of an arcing narrative, the series wants us to accept as its mission of suspense the mystery of this crypto drag-king-meets-shopaholic friendship.
  26. It’s the last of the big-four British costume dramas of recent years to make its American public-television debut, after “Downton Abbey,” “Call the Midwife” and “Mr. Selfridge,” and it’s the most frivolous of the bunch, which is saying quite a bit.
  27. It's well made and also at times unnecessarily cheesy.
  28. The show is based on a small independent film of the same name, which was never terribly daring to begin with. Any sharpness has been smoothed away for television. Mary and her friends talk endlessly about drinking, but never get drunk; they make knowing references to long-ago loss of virginity, but never seem to have sex. Party Girl is as sweetly innocent as "Clueless," the film that seems to provide its true inspiration.
  29. Though the first episode of Mr. Belvedere indicates that the basic format is fertile ground for humor, its creators should beware believing that a benign laugh track means they have been funny.
  30. The problem is more likely to be the generic nature of Emily's misadventures, and the soap opera implausibility of the medical stories, which is extreme, even for the genre.

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