The New York Times' Scores

For 1,967 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Undeclared: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Notes from the Underbelly: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 942
  2. Negative: 0 out of 942
942 tv reviews
  1. Irresistibly, corrosively funny.
  2. An absorbing film by Michael Tucker and Petra Epperlein, has both [insight and subtlety], making it as rewarding as it is thought-provoking.
  3. All the actors are wonderfully credible, even when forced to deal with the occasional creaky line. (Brenda says Nate doesn't know her, and he answers, "Yeah, because you won't let me.") Freddy Rodriguez adds humor as Federico, so talented at restoring corpses that he puts the Humpty Dumpty who was chewed up in the mixing machine back together. And Ms. Conroy's portrayal of the mother is subtle, funny and painful. [1 June 2001, p.E25]
    • The New York Times
  4. "Family Guy" stands to become the best satire of all-American dysfunction next to "The Simpsons." [29 Jan 1999]
    • The New York Times
  5. Ed is a throwback, a hopeful, pixilated Capra character who wants to believe that things will work out as they should and is genuinely baffled and disappointed when they don't. Yet "Ed" the show doesn't seem creaky because Ed the character has also been endowed with ironic self-awareness, as might be expected on a series created by the men behind "The Late Show With David Letterman." He does wonders for both lawyers and bowling.
  6. [The] brilliantly deranged animated show returns for a second season Sunday on Adult Swim, picking up where it left off: with time stopped.
  7. Feud, with blunt writing but exquisite performances, recreates that dish, critiques it and eats it with relish.
  8. The 2016 presidential campaign has yet to produce a distinctive comedy voice, but Ms. Bee made a bold early case that it could be hers.
  9. A crackling-sharp spinoff...The show swiftly finds its balance. Not every series lends itself to cloning, but the essential qualities of "Law and Order" seem made for it: headline-generated stories resolved in self-contained episodes; a no-nonsense tone; a cast large enough to vary the focus.
  10. The Missing is imaginatively written, well cast, chillingly believable and quite addictive. This kind of story has been told this way before, but somehow that doesn’t make this telling any less compelling.
  11. National Treasure is a beautifully drawn portrait of ugliness, impeccably written and acted, yet painful to absorb.
  12. Manhattan has a feel both for the rush of scientific discovery and for the often-difficult personalities drawn to it. In this war story, the most fascinating battles are among allies.
  13. The remake has everything that those earlier versions had and something more: Tracey Ullman and Carol Burnett together and at each other's throats.
  14. The Knick has become much more than another tortured-genius antihero story. It has developed a sprawl reminiscent of HBO’s “Deadwood,” stretching to the mansion and the gutter with equal familiarity.... Despite the often dark outlook, there’s also a sense of awe at the analog machinery of life.
  15. It doesn’t try to be the movie or outdo it in terms of fright factor, nor does it provide any reasons for mockery. It’s well-made, well-acted television, which is more than can be said for some of the reboots rolling out this fall.
  16. Had it arrived 10 or 15 years earlier, when long-form narrative was not the dominant form on cable television, it would have been felt, arguably, more as an explosion than a trickle. The series has at least so far failed to find a large audience, indicating perhaps how much we have come to take good serial drama for granted.
  17. While it is quite silly, it's silly in a clever and engaging way, which is the signature style of its creator, Matt Nix.
  18. You say darker, I say richer. ... Ms. James and Mr. Thomson lend the stability of skilled veterans to the proceedings, which helps Ms. McNulty do the difficult work of selling a complicated character who is simultaneously vulnerable and proud, self-denying and self-absorbed, practical and prone to fantasy. Her portrayal isn’t seamless, but it’s endearing.
  19. The casting is delicious, the characters and their stories grow more complex with each episode, and Graham and Roxanna find that you can’t serve the rich without becoming caught in the quicksand of greed. And you know how quicksand works. The harder you struggle against it, the farther it sucks you in.
  20. "Everybody Hates Chris" is the first show in a long time centered on a teenager whose main problem is not adolescent angst, but real life. And Mr. Rock makes it funny, not maudlin or mean.
  21. The documentary is a loving tribute to his personal charm and other talents.
  22. Rosemary’s Baby bends to current fashions, and, accordingly, is more straightforward and much gorier than the original film. But partly because the story has been so altered, it still has mystery and suspense.
  23. Five Days, made by the BBC and HBO, is riveting because it weaves the most familiar milestones of a major homicide investigation--the news conferences, police interrogations and family meltdowns--into a less predictable and intricately layered narrative that averts clichés without diluting the suspense.
  24. Better Call Saul is better than good: It’s delightful--in a brutal, darkly comic way, of course.
  25. The advice here is to forget the politics and enjoy the performances and the trip back in time.
  26. Cheerfully cynical yet with a sincere appetite for the game, The Circus is both a document and an example of the superficiality of today’s elections. It may not be a three-dimensional picture, but it’s a vivid one.
  27. Previewing the songs may be enough to draw Foo Fighters fans. For everyone else, Mr. Grohl provides, through interviews, archival clips and his own narration, a musical and social history of the city that’s both surprisingly detailed and decidedly personal.
  28. Wwhether they say so or not, everyone seems aware that prison sieges don’t end well. That knowledge invests the season with purpose. More than ever, Orange is like a speeding vehicle with a wheel missing: It doesn’t always steer steadily, you can feel the chassis shimmying and straining, but the velocity is urgent.
  29. A disturbing and delicious beast, a sendup of TV home shows that draws on Ms. Sedaris’s sunshiny comic versatility to explore the dark oddities in the back of the spice cabinet.
  30. With some delicious comic touches, Quantum Leap is slyly offering two cheers for the "sensitized" man of the 1980's. Sam even managed to phone his beloved father, who had died in 1974. The experience left him with tears streaming down his face. Mr. Bakula (''Eisenhower & Lutz,'' Broadway's ''Romance Romance'') pulls all of this off with skillful charm. He could easily get away with devouring an entire quiche. [30 Mar 1989, p.C24]
    • The New York Times

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