The New York Times' Scores

For 10,263 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Out of the Clear Blue Sky
Lowest review score: 0 Vampire in Brooklyn
Score distribution:
10,263 movie reviews
  1. Stupendously entertaining.
  2. Excellent quasidocumentary, which sends shivers down the spine. (Review of Original Release)
  3. A vibrantly vulgar comedy that never hangs around to admire its own cleverness.
  4. Clever, funny, wildly innovative film.
  5. Captain Phillips, a movie that insistently closes the distance between us and them, has a vital moral immediacy.
  6. In its time, this film represented the arrival of something new, and even now it can feel like a bulletin from the future.
  7. Mr. Loznitsa doesn’t lighten the mood with any familiar filmmaking tricks: there are, for instance, no musical cues to guide you over the troubling or ambiguous passages. Like the characters, you work through each surprising turn.
  8. Mystic River is the rare American movie that aspires to -- and achieves -- the full weight and darkness of tragedy.
  9. Like Hitchcock, Mr. Wong is at once a voyeur and fetishist par excellence.
  10. Mr. Ledger magically and mysteriously disappears beneath the skin of his lean, sinewy character. It is a great screen performance, as good as the best of Marlon Brando and Sean Penn.
  11. Mr. Bale, like some other stars who embrace playing ugly, feels as if he’d been liberated by all the pounds he’s packed on and by his character’s molting looks, an emancipation that’s most evident in his delicately intimate, moving moments with Ms. Adams and Ms. Lawrence.
  12. Considering that he’s a stick figure, Bill, the main character in It’s Such a Beautiful Day, sure does have a complex internal life. And this animated film by Don Hertzfeldt does an amazing job of making you feel it, in all its sadness, terror and transcendence.
  13. Creates a cinematic mosaic of American lives unprecedented in its range, balance, subtlety and even-handedness.
  14. The first 40 minutes or so of Wall-E -- in which barely any dialogue is spoken, and almost no human figures appear on screen -- is a cinematic poem of such wit and beauty that its darker implications may take a while to sink in.
  15. A truly majestic visual tone poem.
  16. The great accomplishment of Gloria, the Chilean writer-director Sebastián Lelio’s astute, unpretentious and thrillingly humane new film, is that it acknowledges both sides of its heroine’s temperament without judgment or sentimentality.
  17. It’s a pitiless, violent story that in its telling becomes a haunting and haunted intellectual and aesthetic achievement.
  18. Watching E.T now, in an era dominated by cold, loud special-effects-laden extravaganzas, one is struck less by its lavish grandeur than by its intimacy and precision.
  19. Mr. Wright's Anna Karenina is different. It is risky and ambitious enough to count as an act of artistic hubris, and confident enough to triumph on its own slightly - wonderfully - crazy terms.
  20. Mr. Allen's most securely serious and funny film to date.
  21. This consistently gripping, visually intoxicating film stands as a landmark of contemporary Turkish cinema.
  22. And the ingenuity of “Sita” — is dazzling. Not busy, or overwhelming, or eye-popping. Just affecting, surprising and a lot of fun.
  23. To call The Descendants perfect would be a kind of insult, a betrayal of its commitment to, and celebration of, human imperfection. Its flaws are impossible to distinguish from its pleasures.
  24. For all its high-flying zaniness the movie has the sting of life, and its humor feels dredged up from the same dark, boggy place from which Samuel Beckett extracted his yuks.
  25. I can't remember the last time the movies yielded up a love story so painful, so tender and so true.
  26. You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet is a sly, elegant meditation on the relationship between reality and artifice. But it is a thought-experiment driven above all by emotion.
  27. The Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami's delicious brain tickler, Certified Copy, is an endless hall of mirrors whose reflections multiply as its story of a middle-aged couple driving through Tuscany carries them into a metaphysical labyrinth.
  28. For all of Mr. Cuarón’s formal wizardry and pictorial grandeur, he is a humanist at heart.
  29. What you see is the intensity of rock 'n' roll at a time when it still felt risky and thrilling.
  30. Mr. Cage digs deep to find his character's inner demons while also capturing the riotous energy of his outward charm. [27 October 1995, p. C3]
    • The New York Times

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