The New York Times' Scores

For 9,298 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Badlands
Lowest review score: 0 Grown Ups
Score distribution:
9,298 movie reviews
  1. Documenting war is a small, partial but indispensable step toward its eventual eradication. Mr. Frei's quiet, engrossing film is a sad and stirring testimony to this vision and to the quiet, self-effacing heroism with which Mr. Nachtwey has pursued it.
  2. This dream of a movie is set in such a place; with its delicate shifts of tone, it could be a fairy tale by Faulkner
  3. A refreshing movie that's so good natured, so confident of its ability to provoke not queasy awe or numb exhaustion but pure delight.
  4. Ms. Zellweger accomplishes the small miracle of making Bridget both entirely endearing and utterly real.
  5. Fastidious and smart, and Ms. Swinton's fixated intensity isn't ever remote; we're always aware of how deeply she's feeling. Her work is magnificent.
  6. Experience filmgoing joy.
  7. Every shot seems measured for maximum effect, and when the pace suddenly quickens in a late action sequence on a deserted subway train, it results in a moment of pure Hitchcockian panic that reverberates like thunder in the fretful, melancholy air.
  8. Smoothly directed and acted with glee... showing quick-witted comic spirit.
  9. She (Varda) plucks images and stories from the world around her, finding beauty and nourishment in lives and activities the world prefers to ignore.
  10. This movie operates in the limbo between memory and oblivion that we recognize as daily life. It bears courageous and stringent witness to the impossibility of bearing witness.
  11. A Grin Without a Cat is a work of extraordinary journalism, but it is also a work of deft and subtle poetry, visual (in the rhyming of gestures and shapes across images and sequences) as much as verbal.
  12. Ultimately lacks the epic dimension of "Y Tu Mamá También," but its vision of that awkward age when sex threatens to overwhelm everything else is acute enough to make everyone who has been there squirm with recognition.
  13. It tells a finely nuanced tale of right, wrong and the gray area in between.
  14. A strange and funny film, smart, complex and difficult to shake.
  15. Even better on a second viewing because the film is such a pure expression of the director's love for the music, a love so infectious it should leave you elated.
  16. The purity and breadth of this meticulous study are all the more gratifying in view of its unprepossessing style.
  17. A fine and loving memorial that preserves his charm, his intellect and his splendid body of work.
  18. At once admirable and deeply unsettling.
  19. Propelled by a captivating, wrenching performance by Karine Vanasse as Hanna, a 13-year-old girl adrift in a sea of powerful emotions in Montreal in 1963.
  20. It's not one of Kurosawa's great films.... But it is, within its own proportions, nearly perfect.
  21. An unexpected delight, a film that weds the humor and magic of a folk tale with a very modern feel for the psychological dynamics between men and women and for the subtle politics of male rivalry in a macho culture. It has been made and acted with intelligence and evident love, which deserves to be requited.
  22. Has enough going on to make it a classic. You'll want to own it.
  23. The concert scenes find the stage awash in such intense joy, camaraderie and nationalist pride that you become convinced that making music is a key to longevity and spiritual well-being.
  24. Mysterious, poetic and allusive, The Werckmeister Harmonies beckons filmgoers who complain of the vapidity of Hollywood movie making and yearn for a film to ponder and debate.
  25. If you have any affection at all for traditional American music, the movie itself -- is pretty close to heaven.
  26. The lovely clarity of this story, which seems to have been drawn from the literature of an earlier age, is well served by the artful subtlety of the telling. Mr. Majidi prefers imagery to exposition, and his shots are as dense with meaning, and as readily accessible, as Dutch paintings.
  27. Much more than a perfectly realized vignette about seduction. It is the latest and most powerful dispatch yet from Ms. Breillat, France's most impassioned correspondent covering the war between the sexes.
  28. Eminently likable...a splendid performance from Alec Baldwin in a far cry from his usual roles.
  29. Praise will stick with you. It's more than worthy of its title.
  30. Essential viewing for anyone who desires a sense of the finer human grain of a war that now commands the attention of the world as never before.
  31. What appears on the screen has a starkness that is almost indelible.
  32. One of the great movies of the 1960's, but it has been, in this country at least, maddeningly elusive. In spite of its bitter edge, Billy Liar is pure Ambrosia.
  33. Quite simply a treat for the ear.
  34. As La Ciénaga perspires from the screen, it creates a vision of social malaise that feels paradoxically familiar and new.
  35. Moves with fluidity and ease through brisk opening conventions to a perfectly poised and balanced endgame.
  36. Its effects seem more like those of a poem or a piece of music than a movie. Requires the reverent darkness and communal solitude of a theater.
  37. You probably won't feel comfortable when Humanité is over, but as you leave the theater you will feel more alive than when you entered.
  38. Beautiful and heartfelt, an oasis of humanity in a season of furious hyperbole.
  39. When you get the shivers watching this wintry tale unfold, it won't be from the cold.
  40. Such an accomplished piece of filmmaking that it interweaves enough characters and themes to fill three movies.
  41. Powerful and very bitter comedy.
  42. Even when it turns turbulent, the film sustains its warm summer glow, and makes itself a conversation piece about the moral issues it means to raise.
  43. The political implications of the film are manifest, as is the quiet courage of making it.
  44. It is, all in all, a rambunctious and inspired ride in which the Coen brothers' voracious fascination with the arcana of American popular culture and their whiz-kid inventiveness reach new heights of whimsy.
  45. One of the best entertainments this season has yet offered.
  46. Their comedy gives audiences that have never seen anything like it a hilarious window on a new world.
  47. So good it leaves you starved for more.
  48. Morris has fashioned a brilliant work of pulp fiction around this crime. [26 Aug 1988, p.C6]
  49. Something special.
  50. Jerry Maguire is loaded with them: bright, funny, tender encounters between characters who seem so winningly warm and real. [13 December 1996, p.C-1]
  51. This modest, enormously likable film, about love and temptation and ties that bind, is about brotherhood most of all. [9 August 1995, p.C9]
  52. A narrative path leading from the sincere to the ludicrous, and culminating in a final image of flabbergasting transcendance, gives Breaking the Waves its surprising power.
  53. You are left with an overall impression of a movie so full of life that it is almost bursting at the seams.
  54. When this hugely ambitious project began, it was a longitudinal study of class divisions among English schoolchildren. But time and persistence have turned it into much more.
  55. Melancholy little gem of a movie.
  56. One of the juiciest male characters to pop up in an independent film this year.
  57. The masterstroke of this small, heartfelt directorial debut (by Peter Care, from a screenplay by Jeff Stockwell) is its integration of animated sequences (by Todd McFarlane) in which action-adventure caricatures of the comic book characters parallel or comment on events in the boys' lives.
  58. It proves to be one of the more exotic blooms in the Disney hothouse, what with voluptuous flora, hordes of fauna, charming characters and excitingly kinetic animation that gracefully incorporates computer-generated motion.
  59. Recoing's performance is a sensitive portrayal of a man in the throes of an excruciating spiritual crisis.
  60. A rueful, warmly affecting film featuring a wonderful performance by Mr. Troisi, The Postman would be attention-getting even without the sadness that overshadows it. [14 June 1995, p. C15]
  61. This film has a conquering spirit. The dankness is replaced by an optimistic blast of sunlight at the end, a contrast to the earlier lighting dimmed with human misery. Mr. Frears blasts away the blight, though he doesn't have to work to restore Okwe's dignity. It shines through from the start.
  62. Remarkable for its genuine, unpretentious lyricism.
  63. There hasn't been a film in years to use creative energy as efficiently as Monsters, Inc.
  64. What lifts the film above many other high-minded documentaries dealing with poverty and the welfare cycle is this filmmaker's astounding empathy for both Diane and Love.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Though it cannot regain the brash originality of ''Raiders of the Lost Ark,'' in its own way 'The Last Crusade' is nearly as good, matching its audience's wildest hopes.
  65. Who would have expected Ms. Zellweger --- and Miramax -- to come through in a musical? And it's one of the few Christmas entertainments to run under two hours. Who couldn't love that?
  66. Gives you the steady pulse of life in a beautiful city viewed through the eyes of a character who, in spite of tragic loss and increasing decrepitude, knows in his bones that he is one of the luckiest men alive.
  67. One of the funniest, and most telling, films of the year. The filmmakers call "Kid" a documentary, but the movie is one of the unusual kind that is firmly lodged inside the subject's perspective.
  68. By allowing the stories to play off one another and allowing layers of meaning to accumulate before we even notice them, the filmmakers capture some of the essential strangeness of life -- the way our relations are governed by laws that remain invisible to us until art reveals their workings.
  69. Delicate and altogether satisfying romantic comedy.
  70. A magnificent conjuring act, an eerie historical mirage.
  71. Mr. Patwardhan has located so much information and found so many willing interview subjects that his War and Peace has a riveting intelligence all its own and earns its epic title.
  72. Mr. Peck's gambit works, and the result is a great film and a great performance.
  73. Offers the clearest analysis of globalization and its negative effects that I've ever seen on a movie or television screen.
  74. Never has a film so strongly been a product of a director's respect for its source. Mr. Jackson uses all his talents in the service of that reverence, creating a rare perfect mating of filmmaker and material.
  75. The movie is full of juices that give it a healthy, pungent flow.
  76. The film's strength is that it sustains an intimate and realistic tone. Mr. Fishburne, who is called upon to deliver several lectures, manages to do so with enormous dignity and grace, and makes Furious a compelling role model, someone on whom the whole film easily pivots.
  77. Thrillingly smart, but not, like so many other pictures in this vein, merely an elaborate excuse for its own cleverness. As you puzzle over the intricacies of its shape, which reveal themselves only in retrospect, you may also find yourself surprised by the depth of its insights.
  78. Unfolds beautifully, with a rueful, knowing intelligence that rises above easy assumptions. [27 September 1996, p.C1]
  79. It is the work of a master -- of more than one, for that matter. Mr. Godard, who once called it "my first real film," was showing the obsession with, and mastery of, cinematic technique that would make him one of the culture heroes of the 1960's.
  80. There is no denying that Amélie is, to paraphrase its title, fabulous.
  81. Polanski, who was a Jewish child in Krakow when the Germans arrived in September 1939, presents Szpilman's story with bleak, acid humor and with a ruthless objectivity that encompasses both cynicism and compassion.
  82. In spite of its limited perspective on Vietnam, its churning, term-paperish exploration of Conrad and the near incoherence of its ending, (it) is a great movie. It grows richer and stranger with each viewing, and the restoration of scenes left in the cutting room two decades ago has only added to its sublimity.
  83. Stunning...a film much tougher and more transfixing than its wan title.
  84. So verbally dexterous and visually innovative that you can't absorb it unless you have all your wits about you. And even then, you may want to see it again to enjoy its subtle humor and warm humanity.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The French Connection is a film of almost incredible suspense, and it includes, among a great many chilling delights, the most brilliantly executed chase sequence I have ever seen. [8 October 1971]
  85. One of the most pleasant foreign films of the year, a funny, graceful and immensely good-natured work.
  86. This comic jigsaw puzzle is crammed with deliriously funny little bits.
  87. Is still sleek, gripping entertainment with a raw-nerved, changeable camera style that helps to amplify its meaning.
  88. Doesn't try to cram messages of uplift down its audience's gullet. It's a great eggscape from banality.
  89. It's undeniably a trifle, but rarely is something like this done with such skill and, well, savoir-faire.
  90. The Coens have used the noir idiom to fashion a haunting, beautifully made movie that refers to nothing outside itself and that disperses like a vapor as soon as it's over.
  91. Making sure that computer-generated animation will never be the same.
  92. No admirer of Mr. von Trier's work should miss this compelling rarity.
  93. Here the clinical, stopwatch precision of Mr. Tykwer's explorations of synchronicity and Kieslowski's warmer, metaphysically dreamy speculations about the role of chance and coincidence in human affairs synchronize into a film whose formal elegance is matched by its depth of feeling.
  94. There's more to everyone here than we're initially led to think. The Good Girl is like a neurotically charged post-millennial take on the trailer-park comedies that Jonathan Demme once claimed for himself.
  95. Sweet Sixteen shows that he's (Loach) as capable of anger as his protagonist and just as eager to draw attention to an unchanging problem: the blight of generational poverty.
  96. For all its exaggerated ordinariness, this film seems to start where others leave off.
  97. Quietly courageous drama .
  98. What makes the performance(s) even better is that Mr. Irons invests these bizarre, potentially freakish characters with so much intelligence and so much real feeling. [23 Sept 1988, p.C10]

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