The New Yorker's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,302 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Aviator
Lowest review score: 0 Bio-Dome
Score distribution:
1,302 movie reviews
  1. A raffishly ironic and insinuating movie--and probably the most sheerly enjoyable film of the year so far.
  2. It feels fresh, almost improvised, mainly because Mills doesn’t drive his scenes toward an obvious resolution.
  3. The required resolution is a long time in coming, but there's plenty to keep you diverted, including the light backchat among the semi-weirdos who make up the brothers' family, and Bullock's ridiculously watchable performance.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The picture has a lovely, understated autobiographical lilt.
  4. For all its missteps, the movie powerfully suggests that Wal-Mart is capable of demoralizing a community so thoroughly that it doesn't have the spirit to carry on its life outside the big box.
  5. By a pleasing irony, the parts of the film that stay with you are concerned not with the dark arts but with something far more unstoppable: teen-agers.
  6. To some degree, “Hidden” is a cat-and-mouse thriller, the only problem being that mouse and cat insist on swapping roles.
  7. Whole passages of non-event stream by, and you half want to scream, and yet--damn it all--by the end of The New World the spell of the images, plus the enigma of Kilcher's expression (she is as sculpted as an idol, and every bit as amenable to worship), somehow breaks you down.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Both Eastwood's performance and the movie itself have the quality of meat-and-potatoes genre-picture entertainment: nothing fancy, nothing unusual.
  8. One might call Neil Young: Heart of Gold soothing, even becalmed, but mellowness and ripeness, when they exist at this high level of craft, should have their season, too.
  9. With its somersaulting trucks, drafts of quaffable blood, and skies full of digitized ravens, Bekmambetov's movie has every intention of whacking "The Matrix" at its own game.
  10. Sophie Scholl: The Final Days may sound like a history lesson, but don't be fooled. It's a horror film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The film swings from farce to soap opera and back again—but it's got enough girl-power moments to make a Spice Girls fan happy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's Leary who's the real surprise here; his sincere, tough-guy performance is mesmerizing. He lifts the film above its familiar, claustrophobic environment into the gritty realism of very good urban drama.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although there isn't anything startlingly original in this tale of three Catholic girls falling in love in late-fifties Ireland, it gets a sweet telling in Pat O'Connor's pretty film.
  11. All in all, this twerpy little movie is one of the most entertaining pictures to be released so far this year.
  12. The Death of Mr. Lazarescu, for all its terrible matter-of-factness, produces tumultuous feelings of amazement and revolt.
  13. The faults of the movie, semi-excusable as self-vindicating ploys, are nothing compared with its strengths.
  14. Bright and crisp and funny, the movie turns dish into art--or, if not quite into art, then at least into the kind of dazzling commercial entertainment that Hollywood, in the days of George Cukor or Stanley Donen, used to turn out.
  15. This square movie, at its best, is very powerful.
  16. The beautiful joke of Factotum is that Dillon is nobility itself.
  17. One of the year’s more luscious releases, offering not just the sleekest car chase but the most romantic of rainstorms.
  18. Not one of Scorsese's greatest films; it doesn't use the camera to reveal the psychological and aesthetic dimensions of an entire world, as "Mean Streets," "Taxi Driver," "Raging Bull," and "Goodfellas" did. But it's a viciously merry, violent, high-wattage entertainment, and speech is the most brazenly flamboyant element in it.
  19. Though Lee still can't resist a fancy visual trick from time to time, Clockers is, at its best—in its compound of the jaunty and the depressing—his ripest work to date.
  20. Flags of Our Fathers is an accomplished, stirring, but, all in all, rather strange movie
  21. It is equipped, like an F-15 Eagle, to engage multiple targets at once.
  22. Revved by the stage performances, the cast courses through the material with disciplined exuberance--especially the eight young actors at the center of the drama, many of whom have never appeared in a film before.
  23. That is the thing about Gibson, fool that he is in other ways: he has learned how to tell a tale, and to raise a pulse in the telling. You have to admire that basic gift, uncommon as it is in Hollywood these days.
  24. It's a film that you need to see, not a film that you especially want to.
  25. A wonderfully entertaining movie.

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