The Playlist's Scores

  • Movies
For 901 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me
Score distribution:
901 movie reviews
  1. A cinematic, cultural and personal triumph, The Dark Knight Rises is emotionally inspiring, aesthetically significant and critically important for America itself – as a mirror of both sober reflection and resilient hope.
  2. Alps has proven Lanthimos to be one of the most fascinating filmmakers anywhere right now.
  3. ParaNorman is a micro-sized masterpiece that wears its heart (and its half-eaten brains) on its sleeve.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A marvelous experience for any devoted cinephile.
  4. Everything matters in Cronenberg's Cosmopolis, but not everything is necessarily the same as DeLillo's book. And that makes the film, as a series of discussions about inter-related money-minded contradictions, insanely rich and maddeningly complex. We can't wait to rewatch it.
  5. Simply put, Samsara tells the story of our world, but onscreen, it is so much more than that.
  6. Uncompromising and uncommercial, divisive and brave, Killing Them Softly bitterly boils at the state of the nation.
  7. An enormously entertaining, crowd-pleasing winner from the director whose comedic edge has never been sharper.
  8. One of the best documentaries, and best films, of the year, it is required viewing for anyone with a desire for making their own world a better place, inspiring you to act up and fight back.
  9. Ponsoldt, Paul and Winstead make a remarkably effective team for this film's points and purposes, and Smashed burns long after it goes down smoothly.
  10. Sister is as bleak and as beautiful as its snowy, mountainous setting.
  11. Wuthering Heights is a model of how to bring a classic novel kicking and screaming into the twenty-first century.
  12. Holy Motors keeps kicking into a different gear, much like an eternally waking dream.
  13. The combination of compelling subject with an exciting and expert approach to documentary form achieves that transcendence you hope for in this genre: a melding of subject and text that is its own beast but also perfectly reflect each other.
  14. Charming, witty, beautifully shot and inexplicably captivating.
  15. You may not be able to figure it out, but that's part of the point of this sensually-directed, sensory-laden experiential (and experimental) piece of art that washes over you like a sonorous bath of beguiling visuals, ambient sounds and corporeal textures.
  16. Unique and at times profound, it's a reminder of how much Kubrick left for us to appreciate in his work, and how the greatest films always leave something more to be discovered with each viewing.
  17. A brilliant, towering picture, The Place Beyond The Pines is a cinematic accomplishment of extraordinary grace and insight.
  18. Presenting a terrifying view of a hidden holocaust and a moral apocalypse in which the most basic humanities have become twisted beyond recognition, The Act of Killing is a towering achievement in filmmaking, documentary or otherwise.
  19. The film isn’t a white knuckle ride, and the pacing can be slow at times, but this is one of those cases where that’s sort of the point, and you certainly don’t begrudge it. A Hijacking is an absorbing, highly moving film.
  20. Sightseers homicidal holiday isn't just a pitch-black comedy made with skill, will and brains; it's also another demonstration that Wheatley is, to use an all-too-appropriate phrase, going places.
  21. Short Term 12 is a roller coaster of every emotion, managing to be both heartwarming and heartrending at once.
  22. As a documentary and a love story, Cutie and the Boxer is nothing short of breathtaking.
  23. Inside Llewyn Davis isn't about someone trying to make it big, but someone just trying to make it, and the Coens celebrate the hard road that can inspire great art.
  24. Hirokazu has crafted a warm and lovely film that suggests the easiest thing about raising a child is embracing how complicated it can be.
  25. Blue is the Warmest Color is a masterpiece of human warmth, empathy and generosity, because in a mere three hours, it gives you a whole new life to have lived.
  26. The endlessly surprising, often riotously funny Computer Chess basks in the details of a group of men who, at a key point in history, are asking themselves not only if they can accomplish something, but why, and what it means to their current generation.
  27. Drive works as a great demonstration of how, when there's true talent behind the camera, entertainment and art are not enemies but allies.
  28. After Tiller is not an important film just because of its political and cultural relevance, but because of its humane and compassionate approach to telling the stories of these doctors, their work and the women that they seek to help.
  29. A wholly illuminating look at Muhammad Ali in all his complexity, providing a surprisingly fresh and vivid portrait of a man who played rope-a-dope with history, religion and sport and emerged from the ring as an inspiring, and flawed icon.

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