Time Out New York's Scores

  • Movies
For 2,717 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2
Lowest review score: 0 Vampires Suck
Score distribution:
2,717 movie reviews
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The keenest irony is that Imogene’s fake suicide note is the most convincing thing she’s ever written — which makes perverse sense since Girl Most Likely is DOA.
  1. For a movie with a critique of mediocrity well within its grasp, this one settles for an embrace of it, barely breaking a sweat.
  2. The whole movie feels like a case of the sweats, putting you in desperate need of the chicken soup of recognizable human behavior.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Madagscar 3 is less interested in plucking the last bit of meat off the series's bones than with simply picking the lowest-hanging fruit.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Essentially an overlong, off-brand episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm.
  3. Bong is so concerned with whodunit that his creaky genre mechanics diminish Kim's determined performance.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Ultimately, the silly material overwhelms the style, particularly in a final act involving magical hillbillies living in them thar hills — during which the movie attempts to make a serious point about the importance of faith in the midst of a lot of bad teeth, worse wigs and cheap jolts. Right.
  4. A soundtrack of churning rock songs by the Kills is as close as this misfire gets to authentic grrrl power, borrowed as it is.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Whatever possessed Bell & Co. to turn a slow-burning creepfest into a frenzied freak show of multiple exorcisms (including one in a moving car), the devil only knows.
  5. What was Clint thinking? (Or Martin Scorsese, when he made "Shutter Island," for that matter.)
  6. One would be better off experiencing Woodley via her heartbreaking turn in last year's "The Spectacular Now," a drama that actually has more to say about nightmarish cliques and individuality than any lackadaisical slide into future schlock.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Given Maxwell’s dry style and fixation on 19th-century vernacular, the result is less like a peering examination of the turbulent political environment than a reenactment of a Ken Burns documentary—or a museum tour.
  7. A set piece involving a skyscraper and a sports car proves he can induce sweaty palms, but one nail-biting moment and some much-misssed Murphy mouthiness won't keep you from feeling like you're the one being ripped off.
  8. It’s a shame that Toe to Toe adheres so stridently to Indiewood clichés.
  9. This story is both uplifting and awe-inspiring. It deserves to be told better.
  10. Maybe Douglas Sirk could have made something profound out of the pseudo-ennobling horsepucky. As is, The Last Song is what the crinkle-nosed Southern belle in all of us would resoundingly deem “Trash! Trash! Trash!”
  11. If its juxtaposition of bad behavior and dairy products leaves you stone-faced or wearily sighing, you should exit the theater posthaste.
  12. For those of us with a love of actorly indulgence, though, the film is a treasure trove, filled with enough molten-gold performances to gild a thousand Oscars.
  13. Third times are rarely charms in the movies, much less fourth go-rounds, and it takes more than ho-hum 3-D and video-game-ready action sequences to liven up diminishing returns
  14. What undoes the film is its rather rancid parent-child sentimentality (a Shyamalan staple, admittedly) and a charisma-free performance from the younger Smith that suggests the apple has fallen very far from the tree.
  15. Capital ends up being neither a high-stakes thriller nor a cutting commentary on real-world bad behavior. It’s just CEO exotica, all dressed up with nowhere to go.
  16. At least Mark Ping Bing Lee’s luscious cinematography distracts from the shallow storytelling. There are worse things than luxuriating in a two-hour Côte d’Azur travel ad.
  17. The film doesn't come within spitting distance of vintage Landis, e.g., "Animal House" or "An American Werewolf in London." But at least it's not "The Stupids."
  18. Brando-wheezing Gandolfini never slums it, but there’s still no shaking the sense that a pro has shown up for amateur hour.
  19. Shorn of its quintessentially American roots, a biting tale of adult extravagance becomes insubstantially tween-aged.
  20. Documentarian Anailín Lucy Mulloy’s eye for the decaying textures of modern Cuba on the ground is sharp, and there are passages—as the dull characters mope and kill time and work up snits—in which you wish the movie were simply nonfiction. As it is, everything feels fake except the Centro Habana barrios themselves.
  21. The novelty of their industry aside, there's little to differentiate this from any other relationship-centered Amerindie.
  22. The set pieces are grand—gloriously dumb and never realistic enough to make you wince at the fact that billions of microscopic souls are dying before your eyes. Rather, you wince at everything else.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's a rebound-romance movie that's simplistic but sweet, an uncomplicated cinematic bonbon. It'll only take a few quick bites, however, before you'll be ready to move on to something meatier.
  23. The razzle-dazzle can't distract from the monotonously overstuffed spy-film plot.

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