Time's Scores

For 491 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Game of Thrones: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 The Playboy Club: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 295
  2. Negative: 0 out of 295
295 tv reviews
  1. While it's a rough, sometimes grim, process, it feels that much more well-earned when, at the end of the first episode, one student, Bobby–who struggled to speak for himself in mock interviews–visits a future class to report that he's held a carpentry job for a month.
  2. In its early hours, Last Resort lays in enough plot and character provisions to potentially last a long, long journey.
  3. Nashville's was the one that made me most excited to see more episodes of the series and see how its world unfolds.
  4. So far it works.... Asylum feels like a more focused, if equally frenetic, screamfest. It's also gorgeously realized.
  5. It's not a movie for music geeks, in the sense of unpacking the band's influences or closely analyzing how their songs worked. Instead it links the music to the members' stories, trying to capture how the electricity of the group's personalities created art. It's not a revelation, but it's an intimate story of the band.
  6. The Dust Bowl is a powerful documentary about what human efforts can achieve and what short-term thinking can wreak.
  7. The Witness films are interesting not just for the external drama but the internal stories of the photographers, who try to explain what led them to seek out this thrilling but potentially deadly work.
  8. It's intriguing and promising that season four kicks off with another detour–this time into the past–that connects to Harlan County here and now.
  9. Beyond the cat-and-mouse international intrigue, which deepens after the pilot, The Americans has an absorbing personal story to tell--one as familiar yet unusual as its aliens-among-us protagonists.
  10. House of Cards isn't wholly original. But it is supremely confident.
  11. Over the first four episodes, Family Tree doesn’t have the gut-busting, excruciatingly funny moments of Guest’s movies--no Stonehenge here--but it adds a warmth to the usual pathos of his characters, and O’Dowd’s hangdog charm is a good match for the story.
  12. An improbable, heart-pounding and-tugging mix of fantastical '60s spy chic and emotionally realistic drama ... Ridiculous, over the top but unashamed, it manages to thrill and win our hearts.
  13. A witty, mature drama that can hit both the chest and the heart.
  14. The O.C. looks to have enough heart, talent and wit to generate a few seasons' worth of luxurious suds.
  15. Deadwood is not the next Sopranos. Everyone likes Italian food, whereas this is beef jerky--slow chewing, an acquired taste but substantial. Sometimes Milch's Shakespearean ambitions get away from him, and the story can drag. But the acting is strong.
  16. While refraining from slapping the comedy on too thick, creator David Chase has made Soprano's inward search surprisingly affecting.
  17. What really makes Felicity enjoyable... is that despite its requisite melodrama, it is emotionally plausible and endearing.
  18. If Sports Night is by far the most interesting new series of the year, and among the most entertaining, it also has some problems. ... Still, Sports Night's freshness is inspiring, and its potential is great.
  19. Less frenetic than Lucy, more mature than Mary, Alley has a shot at being TV's all-time funny woman.
  20. As homage to the unclean gymnastics of p.r., Spin City is certainly the season's most believable new sitcom. And also by far the best.
  21. VR.5 is a science-fiction TV show that Patricia Highsmith might have written. For all its vividly colored effects, it is above all an exploration of the unsolved mysteries of Sydney's interior life.
  22. An imaginative departure from the sea of indistinguishable sitcoms on the networks this fall.
  23. The show's grungy ambience and gleeful puncturing of TV ideals of happy domesticity have made it the most daring new sitcom of the fall.
  24. The season's best new sitcom. ... Reiser, a former stand-up comic, has knife-edge timing and a full repertoire of nervous tics, and Hunt manages to be both charming and exasperating at the same time.
  25. The show becomes more engrossing as is spins out from her story, fleshing out the inmates, their backstories, and their alliances. You may come for the culture-clash cringe-comedy; it’s the real human stories that will have you captivated.
  26. What’s most compelling about The Bridge is that it emphasizes not the psychology or forensics of the case but its context.
  27. Brooklyn Nine-Nine is easily the fall’s strongest comedy pilot, clever, appealing, feeling thought-through and lived in after only a half-hour.
  28. The charming pilot swerves quickly from the expected Bravo-reality-show-catfight scenario and becomes something more complicated and rewarding: a good-hearted comedy about an extended family (including Pete’s two ex-wives) figuring out how to make itself work on the fly.
  29. In the three episodes sent to critics in advance, Community sounds like itself again.
  30. Refreshingly, Looking doesn’t contort itself to create a character to represent every different aspect of “the gay experience.”
  31. While Broad City is not heartwarming comedy, there’s an undertone of need and connection between them that helps their friendship make sense: Ilana needs Abbi’s dependability, Abbi needs Ilana to give her a kick into gear. Together, they give the early episodes an off-kilter sense of fun that recommends sticking around for more. Broad City is not the next Louie yet, nor should it try to be, but it’s a promising version of itself.
  32. It offers a quiet, empathetic picture from the perspective of Romney and his family of what it’s like for a human being to experience the glare of a modern media campaign and to offer himself up for rejection, twice.
  33. In each one [hour] that we do see, there’s a sense of urgency in the face of change, of characters figuring they have maybe one more chance to get themselves where they want to be.
  34. As the series itself develops (it was somewhere in episode 3 that I really got on board), all these broad-strokes characters add together into a more complex whole.
  35. The first newscast did feel simultaneously long and breathless, maybe because there was little to vary it or break up the topic segments.... But it was a funny, confident start.
  36. It’s a first draft told by a first responder, with no time for niceties. But it is deepened and rounded out by some remarkable supporting performances, especially a fantastic Jim Parsons as Tommy, a warmhearted activist volunteer.
  37. Even the best version of The Leftovers, if it proves a complete creative success, will not be a show for everyone. Yet it believes fervently, messily, heartbreakingly, that even two percent of everyone means more than you can imagine.
  38. There’s a certain amount of melodrama in the premiere (which is all that was previewed for critics), but the beginning fits a fair amount of nuance into a package that could have been a soapbox. Ireland in particular gives Christine fine shading, and the way that race plays into the story--and into Adam’s career ambitions--feels more natural than engineered.
  39. What works about The Honorable Woman is how well its particular story and larger themes echo each other: trust and mistrust, hope and disappointment, resentment and revenge, repeating for generations.
  40. The result is the most promising show in years for Starz, which since Party Down’s glory days has focused on blood-heavy spectacles like Spartacus and Black Sails or morose antihero dramas like Boss and Magic City.
  41. While The Roosevelts is, yes, long and at points fast-forwardable, in its best moments it gives human breath to a well-covered period of history, all in service of an idea: showing the ways that, through these generation, America matured and changed.
  42. Gotham is not reinventing the dark cop show, or the dystopian drama, or the superhero genre. But it combines them in a way that’s invigorating–and, honestly, it’s probably better than a new series with this built-in fanbase needed to be.
  43. There’s enough talent and intensity here for me to step behind the tent flap, to see if all this can cohere into something super freaky.
  44. [A] captivating, slow-burn emotional mystery.
  45. MasterChef Jr. is the most delightful, cathartic reality competition on TV because it lets you see contestants taking unsullied pleasure in what they can do.
  46. It de-emphasizes what I thought was worst about the original–the shooting-fish-in-an-aquarium reality-TV satire–and builds on what was best: Lisa Kudrow’s microcalibrated performance, and its cringe-making yet sympathetic depiction of an actress, now around 50, trying to make it in an industry that stamps a sell-by date on women.
  47. It’s very good, a swift-moving crime thriller that also takes the time to measure the effects of the crime on Tony and Emily’s marriage, their state of mind, and the lives of the French townspeople who were drawn into the investigation and may be again.
  48. There are signs that the premise may not sustain for long (the title, after all, gives it only a week), but it still shows that a good pratfall is the universal language.
  49. The new episodes quickly jump back in, with higher stakes and sharper jokes, and creator Josh Schwartz hasn't let the strike stop him from developing Chuck's character.
  50. Its stripped-from-the-tabloids approach is nothing new, but it's well done, and a little familiarity won't hurt the show's chances.
  51. Like a successful patient, the show has learned and grown, becoming more reliably compelling.
  52. Lie to Me's pilot is brisk anthropological fun.
  53. It's a promising comedy about a shallow man trying to make his life right, one bad deed at a time.
  54. If The Good Wife can maintain the first episode's tone, it will keep an audience even after political sex scandals fade from the news.
  55. What Prison Break lacks in plausibility--basically, everything--it makes up for in plotting, pacing and panache.
  56. None of these [new sci-fi] series matches Lost's mix of character, wit and story, but the grim Invasion at least has the story part down, and keeps the horror at a nicely restrained simmer
  57. Imperfect but chilling.... In the end, Sleeper Cell is every bit as nailbiting as 24, with one crucial difference: neither the terrorists nor the Feds are supergeniuses.
  58. It's all delightfully phony, but will win your faith on charm and panache.
  59. Good-hearted, eccentric and wry, Ride goes nowhere fast, but it has a fine time getting there.
  60. The show's conversational improv rhythms and realistic, documentary style make Sons and Daughters worth adopting.
  61. Deadpan and gorgeously shot, The Hills is an addictively watchable visit to the cool kids' table.
  62. This loose, wry sitcom makes a crackling love connection.
  63. It's highly entertaining.
  64. It's worth hopping on this poetic, profane story of frontier money lust before it rides into the sunset.
  65. It's a drama of chance with enough charm to roll the dice on.
  66. Like its endearingly flawed protagonist, Ugly Betty is promising but not perfect.
  67. Has the same quick-cut look, crisp dialogue and bone-crunching game scenes [ast the movie].
  68. The tense pilot suggests the series has a few twists up its sleeve and a cast up to the challenge.
  69. For all the show's cartooniness, its gender-conscious take on the TV business is actually more sophisticated [than Studio 60's].
  70. While not perfect, [it] manages to be both exciting and--if not exactly realistic--then at least reality-grounded.
  71. Drive is an audacious, exhilarating enough concept, and its pace and writing snappy enough, to make you want to believe.
  72. So far, it's carried mostly on the scary-eyed charisma of Summer Glau as John's robo-protector. This grim Chronicles needs to put some flesh on its humans.
  73. The writing is uniformly strong and Byrne excellent not only at reading Paul's dialogue but conveying what he's withholding--his true feelings about his patients, his inner turmoil over his disintegrating home life. But the storylines vary wildly from riveting to tedious.
  74. Margulies vanquishes her ER heroine image, but bad dialogue and dull legal stories undermine her case.
  75. A sharp if uneven Whitmanian sampler.
  76. While it's not a great TV movie--it's basically a high-class Movie of the Week, a docudrama that dramatizes events you'll recall from the news at the time if you were following it--it's nonetheless a gripping recounting (ha!) of a Presidential drama that was pretty gripping at the time to begin with.
  77. The band has a refreshing scruffiness but except for Joe gets too little screen time to leaven the formula slickness.
  78. I'm interested but not engrossed, though it offers the potential for a change-up in the Dexter storyline.
  79. The first couple of episodes, in which Hank tries to be monogamous with his ex, offer some promise, but for me the show is still works better for its pithy little scenes.
  80. While it's haunting, cerebral and gorgeous, it's also a little cold, though the flashes of humor help. Like its actives, it's a marvelous piece of engineering. But I hope it develops a personality of its own.
  81. While not as mind-blowing as the last season's finale (which had me finally buying into the show after a season on the fence), does a good enough job continuing to run with the parallel-universe scenario established toward the end of season one.
  82. Curb, meanwhile, stopped being appointment viewing for me a couple seasons ago, but it threatens to become so again.
  83. It's an insightful, easy-to-like, low-stakes character dramedy about men coming to terms with their limits. A story for an era of lower expectations, Men of a Certain Age meets its own diminished ones, and surpasses them.
  84. The opening episodes are uneven but show a lot of potential.
  85. while I can't say that it's a great HBO comedy yet--it is not, really, even strictly a comedy in the ha-ha-hilarious sense--it's likeable and absorbing and made me want to stick around for more.
  86. The show continues striking a good balance with its moments of dark humor.
  87. Some of the later episodes (I've seen four) are uneven, and the stories sometimes have the feel of standup riffs literally adapted for the screen. But even those can be funny and well-observed.
  88. It is, by default, one of the better new shows on the big networks, and it does what it's trying to do very well. But what it's trying to do is very limited in its aims and upside.
  89. Rather than titillate you with how dangerous Bob's life and position are, the show focuses on how sad, and oddly romantic, his torn-between-two-lovers situation is. And in the pilot, at least, it doers a very good job.
  90. It's a fetching enough prospect and Kudjoe and Mbatha-Raw do a fine job bringing the Blooms alive as a bourgeois couple sharing the joy of feeling really alive again. I also suspect that they could do a fine job with even more.
  91. But after an episode, I'm intrigued. My Generation may end up as bad as the mockumentary it contains, but I'd rather watch it try and fail in its messy ambition than watch the competence of a dozen other new shows this fall.
  92. It's fun if a little forgettable, and the joy it takes in its characters discovering their new powers so far works better than the fairly familiar parent-child conflicts and midlife crises that play out in the background.
  93. while the TV satire is far too broad, the dialogue is wittily written, and Matt LeBlanc--playing himself, inappropriately cast by the network to replace the elderly thespian who originated his role--turns out to be a pleasure to watch.
  94. For all its cheekiness and raunch, Skins has more sweetness than snarky teen soaps like Gossip Girl.
  95. While the first two episodes of Portlandia are hit-and-miss, its good-natured satire generally hits, as they say, pretty close to home.
  96. It has some voice and verve, but it's definitely no Shield yet--either in content or innovation--and like a new rookie on patrol, I'm putting it on probationary status for now.
  97. If you feel like you would like Mildred Pierce, in other words--if this kind of period piece is catnip to you--then I bet you will love Mildred Pierce. If not--well, at least, you might admire Haynes' enthusiasm.
  98. Within Falling Skies' limited ambitions is some decent popcorn entertainment.
  99. I've now seen three episodes of Wilfred, however, and I think this bizarre, dark yet oddly good-hearted series has legs. Four of them, at least.
  100. As a straight-ahead sci-fi tale, it's engrossing: how is this happening, who is doing it to us, and how does it relate to Captain Jack's own blessing/curse of immortality? The social aspects, however, are handled more hamfistedly so far.

Top Trailers