TV Guide's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,171 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 L'Enfant (The Child)
Lowest review score: 0 Terror Firmer
Score distribution:
5,171 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Indeed, all of the performers in the film truly shine, and all of them can probably thank Sam Mendes for creating an ideal environment.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    This exceptional film features some of the most beautiful cinematography ever seen on film, in service of some of the most horrible images imaginable.
  1. Despite the absence of dialogue -- the mice squeak and the oak creatures caw like ravens -- Cegavske imbues her scrappy little creatures with disturbingly complex personalities. And if the tale's moral is less than clear, its haunting images speak directly to some dark, preverbal corner of the heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The cast is wonderful--especially McGavin, Billingsley and Petrella--the laughs are nonstop if rarely subtle, and the whole thing deserves to become a Christmastime classic.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Shattering social and sexual conventions, Last Tango in Paris stands as one of Bernardo Bertolucci's finer achievements.
  2. Serenely stunning.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Deft comedy set in a neurotic town. People may argue about the relative merits of Annie Hall vis-a-vis Manhattan, which is a better and more fully realized film. By this time Allen had forsworn the glib one-liner and spent more time developing well-rounded characters.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Brilliantly conceived, imaginatively structured, superbly written, stylishly composed and photographed, and very often wryly funny, Killer of Sheep lives up to its official designation as a national treasure.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Hadzihalilovic succeeds brilliantly at crafting a meaningful enigma that somehow grasps the essence of adolescence, but only grows more mysterious with each revelation.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    So it should come as no surprise that what Maddin eventually produced is a film about HIS Winnipeg, a psychological terrain that's no more -- nor less -- "real" than William Carlos William's Paterson or Marcel Proust's Combray.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An undeniably brilliant, nightmarish portrait of one man's personal hell. (Review of original release)
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Rather than adapt the novel per se, Winterbottom has adapted Sterne's hilarious attempts to make the mess of life fit the neat contours of the novel by making a movie about an attempt to make Sterne's chaotic and confusing novel fit the contours of a film.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A masterpiece. It is a credit to Cocteau's genius (and to that of his collaborators) that he has taken the unreal world of a fairy tale and made it as real as the world around us.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Harvey Milk embodied the concept that "all politics is personal," and by presenting the famed Mayor of Castro Street's personal and public lives with such clarity and empathy, Van Sant has made something very rare in Hollywood -- a genuinely powerful political film that works equally well as a story of personal triumph.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There is much to recommend in this film, and sheer energy pours off the screen in every frame.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A wickedly funny black comedy that follows the increasingly bizarre series of events that befall hapless word-processer Griffin Dunne after he ventures out of his apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and goes downtown in search of carnal pleasures.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Documentary filmmakers Sean Fine and Andrea Nix Fine found an ingenious way to tell their story in a film that is as unflinching as it is uplifting.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Actor-turned-writer Dan Futterman's smart, subtle screenplay, which explores both Capote's determination to turn murder into literature and the deeply troubling questions he raised in the process.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Wu is able to demonstrate both the timelessness and the universality of stories which, on the surface, sound extreme and unique.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The film has enough adventure and excitement to satisfy, and the faintly bittersweet note of the ending is made deliciously palatable by its artistic rightness.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The film is flushed with bright light and cartoon hues, nicely accenting the fast-paced stew of incidents.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Director Steven Spielberg has achieved something close to the impossible--a morally serious, aesthetically stunning historical epic that is nonetheless readily accessible to a mass audience.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Throughout this raw, often brilliant drama, the Dardennes refuse to judge these deeply flawed characters. They instead maintain a moral objectivity that ultimately leaves room for the possibility of redemption, no matter how dire the sins committed.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Superb drama from New York-based filmmakers Ryan Flek and Anna Boden.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the most powerful boxing films ever made.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A searing example of writer-director Billy Wilder at his most brilliantly misanthropic. An uncompromising portrait of human nature at its worst, the film was so far ahead of its time in its depiction of a media circus and the public's appetite for tragedy that it was a commercial disaster when first released, but now stands as one of the great American films of the 1950s.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Kubrick's liberal, anti-authoritarian reading of Anthony Burgess's very Catholic allegorical novel is morally confused but tremendously powerful... No serious moviegoer can afford to ignore it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the great New York films, swathing the city in a layers of dewy love and glossy chic. [Review of re-release]
  3. Manages to inject more than a little humor into this tension-filled genre classic.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Much imitated, still unsurpassed. By critical consensus one of the best movies ever made, The Seven Samurai covers so much emotional, historical, and cinematic ground that that it demands to be viewed over and over again.

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