TV Guide's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,161 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Clean
Lowest review score: 0 Zombie! vs. Mardi Gras
Score distribution:
5,161 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Gus Van Sant's direction here is supremely confident, fusing witty camerawork, neat editing, and a jazz-oriented score to make Drugstore Cowboy an exhilaratingly bumpy ride.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Sure-footed thriller, beautifully photographed, with Ford's best performance thus far.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Zoo
    Bold and unforgettable meditation on a truly bizarre incident that pokes at the very heart of one of our culture's biggest taboos.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Director Weir and cinematographer Russell Boyd's re-creation of the invasion and battle action is stunning, but what makes Gallipoli such an affecting film is its intimate presentation of the friendship between Archy and Frank (wonderfully essayed by Lee and Gibson).
  1. Kramer vs. Kramer is, essentially, a television movie that was raised into the feature category by the excellence of the execution.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A beautiful, at times poetic exercise in excess from Brian De Palma.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Diner is an often hilarious, frequently touching film.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Powerful, haunting, and at times very moving, The Last Temptation of Christ presents its account of the events and conflicts of Christ's life with a depth of dramatized feeling and motivation that renders them freshly compelling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Mike Nichols, in his first venture into movies since "The Fortune," elicited superlative performances from the actors, particularly Streep and stage veteran Sudi Bond.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    In the end, Haar's powerful and terribly sad film speaks volumes, not just about life in contemporary Israel, but in the U.S. as well.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Sicilian-born filmmaker Emanuele Crialese takes a huge leap forward from his pretty but simplistic "Respiro" with this highly original, startlingly beautiful and emotionally resonant film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The film has enough adventure and excitement to satisfy, and the faintly bittersweet note of the ending is made deliciously palatable by its artistic rightness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the great New York films, swathing the city in a layers of dewy love and glossy chic. [Review of re-release]
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Delicatessen is an ingeniously funny film with a surprisingly sweet romance at its center.
  2. The Graduate is a flawlessly acted and produced film. [Review of re-release]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A finely observed film but insufficiently developed as a satire of middle America. [Review of re-release]
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Of the long list of couples who have loved neither wisely nor particularly well, few have such power to disturb as Burton Pugach and the love of his life, Linda Riss.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Hoffman is uncharacteristically charming in a demanding role; the supporting cast is uniformly excellent, particularly Chief Dan George as a befuddled patriarch who takes the supernatural as a matter of course.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Straightforward, energetic, updated Bard. 28-year-old star-director-adapter Kenneth Branagh's spellbinding version of Shakespeare's Henry isn't superior to Olivier's 1944 version - it's different, and complementary to it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This touching and beautifully photographed, if slightly overlong, tale of a boy and his horse follows the escapades of young Alec Ramsey (Reno), who is traveling across the ocean with his father.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Burtynsky's keen sense of color, pattern and composition are obvious from his work, but equally acute are his thoughts on how he as an artist as well as an inhabitant of the planet fits into the larger scheme of things.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The cast is wonderful--especially McGavin, Billingsley and Petrella--the laughs are nonstop if rarely subtle, and the whole thing deserves to become a Christmastime classic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Chilling Fosse vision of Weimar Berlin, stylishly directed and choreographed, featuring a show-stopping musical performance by Minnelli, Grey's unforgettable emcee and thoughtful acting from Michael York.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The real emotional impact of the film lies in the candid interviews with Crowhurst's wife, Clare, and his son, Simon, both of whom are clearly still haunted by Crowhurst and his fateful voyage.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Against all odds, you'll leave this remarkable film caring quite a bit for the old coot -- surely a sign of a very good documentary.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The final confrontation is a slow-motion, De Palma-esque massacre in a hotel lobby that begins and ends in the amount of time it takes for a high-flying can of Red Bull to hit the floor. Breathtaking.
  3. By turns awe-inspiring and deeply human.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The result is a beguiling and often poignant pageant of outsider musicians, but the broken heart of this extraordinary film comes directly from Zobel's own personal experience.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Lee has perfectly captured the details, textures, sights and sounds of a China caught between East and West, occupied by an ancient enemy and quaking on the eve of an earth-shaking revolution.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    With his carefully controlled pacing and superb use of sound, Sarkies draws the viewer deep into the experience of a town caught completely off-guard by a kind of violence they could never have expected, and won't soon forget.

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