TV Guide's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,169 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Lawrence of Arabia (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 Terror Firmer
Score distribution:
5,169 movie reviews
  1. Director Gillian Armstrong's feminist spin on classic material retains the moving humanity of Louisa May Alcott's novel while reworking it with welcome freshness.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This delightful, fast-paced and entirely fictional imagining of Shakespeare's life during the writing of "Romeo and Juliet" brims with witticisms predicated on the determination to have a rollicking good time exploring the link between libido and creativity.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Simple but deeply touching documentary.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This semiautobiographical work by Federico Fellini was the first film to bring him a measure of world attention.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Poking fun at its American mythos, but never descending into camp comedy, this sequel makes for a wonderful time.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The filmmakers have allowed themselves an overlong 140 minutes in order to preserve as much of the plot as possible, but they have bypassed many of the novel's key ideas and ironies.
  2. Eminently worth seeing, even if it leaves you wishing it were as consistently inventive as Aardman's first feature, "Chicken Run" (2000).
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When all is said and done, Pacino is the riveting presence that makes the movie work and it is difficult to imagine any other actor in the part. (Review of Original Release)
  3. Moreno's subtly calibrated mix of intelligence, naivete, rebelliousness, charisma and practicality produces an unforgettable protagonist; even Maria's recklessness seems reasonable because it's so clearly rooted in desperation.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    This exceptional film features some of the most beautiful cinematography ever seen on film, in service of some of the most horrible images imaginable.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    They're answers that will either earn your respect, or further damn him as the architect of an American nightmare.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Rather than confront what it sets up, it takes the one joke and runs - till it runs out of steam.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    While Gyllenhaal is a competent actor, Ledger - surprisingly enough - is becoming a great one, and the levels of intensity they bring to their roles render this romantically star-crossed relationship emotionally lopsided.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A bold, painful memoir that finds an innovative middle-ground between conventional documentary and a homemade, home-movie collage.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The film is filled with humor, compassion and cajones, and never once glosses over the fact that these guys are prickly personalities who can sometimes act like jerks. There are also a few tears, but remarkably, not a single one is shed in pity.
  4. Feel-good tone notwithstanding (and creepy to boot), there are nagging riddles about the Helfgott story that the film has neither the nerve nor the sense to tackle.
  5. A rapt fascination with transcendent lunacy runs through Herzog's work, both fiction and documentary; while disdaining Treadwell's rhapsodically anthropomorphized vision of nature.
  6. Classic melodrama given a thoroughly modern, utterly Almodovarian face-lift.
  7. Kristin Scott Thomas is the film's revelation. She takes center stage as a smart, fearless woman who's utterly irresistible.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    On a miniscule budget, Ghobadi conveys the terror of war, while the beautifully edited sequence in which Iranian villagers make bricks resembles nothing so much as a choreographed dance number.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The final effect, particularly the climactic ballroom sequence, is astonishing -- a haunting impression of the vast synchronicity of unbroken time that must surely stand as one of the great achievements in the development of the movie medium.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    On the surface, nothing really happens, but to call it a nonevent would be to miss the point entirely.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Beautifully edited by Soderbergh, the film is evenly paced, its subtleties accreting slowly, and by the end it gathers powerful emotional momentum.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    No other motion picture about Hollywood comes near Billy Wilder's searing, uncompromising and utterly fascinating portrait of the film community.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of Coppola's very best.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A great movie is something more than the sum total of all its parts, and here, the elements all come together to form a feature that speaks a universal form of optimism that isn't likely to get lost in translation, no matter where it screens, or who is watching.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Nicole Kidman does the best work of her career in a character that seems to fit her tighter than pantyhose. Swathed in camera-friendly pastels, she's dead from the neck up (a scene with uncredited George Segal confirms that) but she's got legs like scissors, ambition like a knife, and a will of pure steel.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Seldom have such complexity, emotional depth, honesty, and realism been invested in what is ostensibly a teen love story.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Where this still vital series was once about what sets us apart, it now seems to be turning towards the things that, in the end, render us all equal.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Oddly enough, this uncharacteristic offering from a director whose name instantly evokes a very particular kind of film -- call it postmodern American gothic -- is also one of his best.

Top Trailers