Variety's Scores

For 1,330 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Curb Your Enthusiasm: Season 3
Lowest review score: 10 Standoff: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 525
  2. Negative: 0 out of 525
525 tv reviews
  1. Director Coky Giedroyc's grittier, reality-based approach to Sarah Phelps' adaptation contrasts sharply the popular and nostalgic musical account "Oliver!" Nevertheless, this version does stay true to Dickens' original intent to call attention to social evils in harsh times.
  2. The episodes don't really go anywhere, but the star-writer-producer has a genial Everyman presence and surrounds himself with a rich array of characters.
  3. Survivors isn't great or groundbreaking, but it's a whole lot more than nothing.
  4. It's a familiar formula, to be sure, but handled with enough panache and conviction to invest the BAFTA-honored pic series with an element of freshness.
  5. Whitechapel can be enjoyed for what it is--an excuse to take another bloody stroll down memory lane, while tacking on yet another cinematic addition to the house that Jack built.
  6. Playing to the cameras, even many elements that feel slightly staged (including convenient intra-housewife feuding) prove nearly irresistible, again reminding us that horrible people you'd never want to associate with are often the spice of reality. This show puts the Bada-Bing in Bravo.
  7. Ultimately, the series contains just enough skepticism to mitigate charges of being exploited as a questionable enterprise's PR tool.
  8. Wells and company have delivered a cop drama with its own racing pulse, albeit for a network that's uncomfortably close to flatlining.
  9. So while the checklist of assets might not add up to 10, there are several things to like about this series, which bodes well for its desire--shared by TV and teenagers--to become popular.
  10. The series can at best be lauded for its efficiency and at worst be chided for resorting to the convenient fallback of Mexican drug lords as its initial heavies.
  11. All those plot threads could be beneficial in sustaining the series on a serialized basis, but Parenthood's multifaceted vision of family risks feeling too precious in places.
  12. Williamson and Julie Plec--working from L.J. Smith's books, which actually preceded "Twilight"--mix these familiar elements into a crimson cocktail that even gets reasonable mileage out of its cliches, which ought to give this early riser a chance to establish some fan loyalty before the other networks launch their Thursday lineups.
  13. The Good Wife doesn't win many style points for originality, but nor does it seek to squeeze into unflattering hipster clothes. And on a network where meat-and-potatoes drama has generally performed beyond merit or expectations, that's probably a very good fit, indeed.
  14. So while Sherri doesn't rock any better than "Rita" does, for Lifetime, that's probably enough.
  15. Not everything works--starting with the split-screen gymnastics footage--but there are enough juicy bits here to forge a solid foundation with plenty of plot tendrils.
  16. Tim's world is so consistently outlandish as to be difficult to resist, especially since Dildarian plays the whole thing with the understatement of Bob Newhart's old phone routines.
  17. Tartly written with good actresses in clearly defined roles, this sitcom hardly breaks new ground but unearths old gags in such unapologetic fashion that it proves reasonably good company.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Whether Work of Art winds up engaging with any of those larger questions or simply provides an addictive mix of catfights and craftsmanship, it certainly has the goods to become more than just a knockoff.
  18. Good Guys isn't a perfect construct, but it's a well-executed one--albeit more a breezy, busy diversion than appointment TV, placing greater reliance on guests than its limited supporting cast to prop up the principals.
  19. The payoff, alas, proves a little too pat to be wholly satisfying, but the fun is in watching Longworth stagger around this somewhat novel setting.
  20. The show is full of nonsequiturs, and the writing doesn't always measure up to the look....Still, stick with the show and there are elements so bizarre as to be difficult to resist.
  21. As presented, Dating in the Dark mercifully makes the orchestrated search for TV romance a little less deaf and dumb than it could have been.
  22. The writers do indulge in a few amusing L.A.-centric detours--including a pointed scene of "reality TV" being filmed, complete with retakes--but there's ultimately no escaping the mostly unchanged (and undeniably durable) formula.
  23. While Q is probably more adept at flaunting her butt-kicking skills than emoting, the pilot is head-turning enough to warrant a second look at the show.
  24. There's enough comedy content in this first seating to warrant keeping Mike & Molly on the TiVo menu, even if it's not quite love at first bite.
  25. Created by Ted Griffin and produced with "The Shield's" Shawn Ryan, Terriers is all about atmosphere. The individual cases aren't particularly enthralling, the characters are kind of a downer, yet each hour ended with enough momentum to drag me somewhat grudgingly into the next.
  26. Fortunately, Rappaport is a fairly effective Everyman, and the wince-inducing aspects of the premise quickly fade into standard workplace comedy deriving a twist from its location.
  27. To its credit, Damages remains the kind of show that demands genuine attention; there's no reading the newspaper or scribbling crosswords while watching it. Moreover, Goodman, Close and Baker are the kind of fine actors that a certain class of viewer would happily watch read the phone book. It's just that given the pacing in these first two episodes, that analogy's not far off.
  28. Granted, the writers recycle so many gags--from the stirring pledge speech to a loopy pot-hazed discussion about time being "a fluid concept"--that there's a temptation to wince at Glory Daze's brazenness. Still, it's all done in such an unabashed way it's sort of hard to stay mad at them.
  29. The show will thus ultimately sink or swim on its protagonist, and while it's a long way back to her TV-medicine internship on "China Beach," Delany can still make scrubs and dialogue about fatal drug combinations and post-mortem wounds sound surprisingly interesting.