Wall Street Journal's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,583 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Waltz with Bashir
Lowest review score: 0 Passengers
Score distribution:
2583 movie reviews
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    So tightly constructed of clichés, stereotypes and chick-lit tropes that it's inert; no fresh air can blow in.
  1. A deadly earnest and deadly dull psychological thriller.
  2. The production's penchant for contrivance is insufferable - not a single spontaneous moment from start to finish - and the boy is so precocious you want to strangle him. It's surely not the fault of Thomas Horn, the remarkable young man who plays him.
  3. Hate is too strong an emotion to spend on such a clumsy, bloodless broadside against human foibles in general and American follies in particular.
    • Wall Street Journal
  4. No need to belabor the awfulness of this film, a romantic comedy devoid of romance - instead of chemistry there's the flow of reverse magnetism - and lacking in comic timing, let alone comic content.
  5. Bleak, remarkably turgid, tediously violent, devoid of drama, deprived of magic, stripped of romance and, except for one of the oddest boy-meets-girl scenes in movie history, a befuddled and befuddling excuse for entertainment.
    • Wall Street Journal
  6. Even as a visual aid, though, The Da Vinci Code is a deep-dyed disappointment. Paris by night never looked murkier.
    • Wall Street Journal
  7. Horns is uncertain in tone — most of its attempts at humor fall flat — and amateurish at best.
  8. The source of this movie's energy is near-perpetual desperation. You can see it in Tom Cruise's fixed grin, and in the mad proliferation of unspecial effects.
  9. All that's missing is wit and humanity.
    • Wall Street Journal
  10. When director Richard Attenborough isn't mangling dance numbers, he's focusing on a love story expressed almost entirely by means of close-ups of moony faces and teary eyes. [12 Dec 1985]
    • Wall Street Journal
  11. I can't say anything nice about Flipped, a painfully clumsy adaptation of a tween novel by Wendelin Van Draanen.
  12. Michael Bay's absurdist comedy is all pain, no gain and an utter monstrosity. It may be the most unpleasant movie I've ever seen, and I'm not forgetting "Freaks," which Pain & Gain resembles, come to think of it.
  13. Talk about tin ears. Black or White comes off as the product of clouded eyes, sour stomachs and addled brains.
  14. Downey is undone by a woefully amateurish production that, sadly and ironically, looks like a cheap TV show.
    • Wall Street Journal
  15. The performances, under Mike Newell's direction, range from conventional (Ms. Roberts) to dreadful, and the script is as shallow as an old Cosmo cover story.
    • Wall Street Journal
  16. Extraordinary Measures requires extraordinary tolerance for bathos, bombast and plain old unpleasantness.
  17. The last thing we need is entertainment that evokes the horror and then trivializes it with cheesy heroics. Never has a movie taken on a subject of greater immediacy, or handled it more ineptly.
    • Wall Street Journal
  18. The movie on the whole is joyless. Whatever Works doesn’t.
  19. Before Firewall crumbles into foolishness, Harrison Ford and Paul Bettany make an oft-recycled plot look like a stylish model that just rolled out of a showroom.
    • Wall Street Journal
  20. Mr. Brooks manages to be deeply loathsome -- no small feat for a film that's shallowly amateurish.
  21. J.Lo should sue her handlers for damages.
    • Wall Street Journal
  22. Mr. Samuell's stylistic revelries are meant as comments on the conventions and excesses of movie romance, but his approach is glib and self-congratulatory. No feelings dwell beneath the layers upon layers of faux-naïve artifice. I dare you to sit through this movie and not wish you were somewhere else.
    • Wall Street Journal
  23. The movie stands as a genuine offense against the venerable and indispensable institution of satire.
    • Wall Street Journal
  24. The IMAX print I saw was so murky as to make you give thanks for the few scenes shot in simple sunlight, the 3-D wasn't worth the bother, and never before have I wanted to chloroform an entire orchestra.
  25. An abomination.
    • Wall Street Journal
  26. Its tone is unquenchably pretentious, and its scale is overblown.
    • Wall Street Journal
  27. A saga of static set pieces and strenuously clever notions, this is a fiasco of a film if ever there was one.
    • Wall Street Journal
  28. This is little more than a big-budget sitcom, with a guest appearance by Mike Ditka, who plays an unfunny version of himself as Phil's assistant coach.
    • Wall Street Journal
  29. Calling Joe Carnahan's movie heartless implies that this auteur of affectless anarchy might have meant to invest it with detectable human feelings, and failed. Better to call it heart-free.
    • Wall Street Journal

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