Wall Street Journal's Scores

For 539 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 True Detective: Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 Category 7: The End of the World: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 387
  2. Negative: 0 out of 387
387 tv reviews
  1. Most of the editors here have charm and pizazz that seem more appealing than the photographs they masterminded.
  2. A series about a high-school girl that's neither maudlin nor alarming nor conceived with intent to preach or to shock. It's further distinguished by its focus on entirely recognizable teenage pains, as endured by an entirely recognizable teenager, Jenna. Its other distinction: strong echoes of an older kind of storytelling, the sort whose characters grow and acquire depth.
  3. Despite some clumsy exposition by its creators, Jack Amiel and Michael Begler, it has a well-researched sense of place.
  4. Power is a frightening but easy-to-get-sucked-into fable about those last two paths to financial success [drug dealing and nightclubs].
  5. The truthful background of this high-stakes history makes it thrilling on a deeper level. Along with the battle scenes and other entertainments, the series reflects many challenges of today’s world.
  6. Who in this family has been plotting what against whom? That this quickly becomes, for the viewer, an urgent question says all that’s necessary about the story’s magnetic pull.
  7. It's an old story rolled out with all the power of the new--meticulously plotted, irresistibly suspenseful.
  8. Boss is not flawless. But buoyed by strong performances and a haunting score, the show makes for deeply affecting television nevertheless.
  9. For all its emotional agony and slow pacing at times, Happy Valley is always moving forward and the fifth episode explodes off the screen.
  10. The series is set in modern-day Rome, where the women wear tight skirts, the men are in sharp suits, and even the corruption is exquisite in its labyrinthine complexity.
  11. It's all more like a steady burn--of talent, of smart writing, of chemical reactions--and it may take a few episodes to feel the heat.
  12. It is neither a cheap thrill or too painful to watch these lost souls being drilled in first impressions.
  13. Despite the music in James Lapine's documentary, Six By Sondheim, it is archival clips of Mr. Sondheim describing how he writes that make the film a treasure.
  14. Suffering is never easy to watch, and when a series revolves around a woman in near-constant mental anguish, things can creep close to tiresome. Such is Ms. Sevigny's performance, though--at once veiled and yet open to view as she has not often been in other roles—that you can't stop looking.
  15. So far--although Glee may be creeping closer to the edge--it remains nearly as delightful as it was when everything about the show seemed shiny and new.
  16. It consistently pokes fun at our culture and foibles in ways that are clever and sometimes sharp but never mean.
  17. The non-toxic intimacy of these struggles--a rarity in reality TV--and the recognizable nature of these lives should keep plenty of viewers glued to the screen.
  18. It’s nonetheless admirably written, and reliably sophisticated comedy.
  19. Strong writing and acting ensure that we soon become so sensitive to the characters that we feel for them the way they feel for their horses.
  20. Sharp-tongued, ambitious, highly seductive--a TV series that has, it can be said, done the job.
  21. It promised, in short, steadily absorbing plots and skilled writing, and these the series has delivered ever since.
  22. It's a measure of the skill brought to this script by Paul Scheuring that a first episode so awash in multiplying complications manages to maintain its coherence and even a significant measure of suspense.
  23. Even without the Hollywood glamour, though, the New York series may turn out to be the superior product, grounded as it is in Mr. Greenberg's compelling, layered character, with a strong mind and vulnerable heart.
  24. This new PBS Masterpiece series written by Andrew Davies is plenty addicting without the lords and ladies, opening a treasure box of tales about love, loss, ambition and the spirit of a new age.
  25. The amusing Odd Mom Out is a sweet, frothy surprise.
  26. The performances by the likes of Mr. Biggs, Ms. Mulgrew and, especially, Ms. Schilling are so convincing, and the dialogue so sharp, that none of this feels like prurience for its own sake.
  27. The glory of this particular adaptation, intentional or not, is that what we bring to it with today's sensibilities can actually enhance the experience.
  28. Alert to every deranged impulse of his clients, Mr. Silver brings his lessons home with vigor and wit.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This isn't just the story of one woman's search for relevance or power in a man's world; it's the story of one human being's search for meaning, one soul's search for redemption.
  29. As the premiere episode nears its end, the plot begins thickening agreeably with so many secrets, dark revelations, shocks and betrayals it all begins to seem familiarly and comfortably absorbing.

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