Washington Post's Scores

For 1,028 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 10.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Murphy Brown: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Saint George: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 426
  2. Negative: 0 out of 426
426 tv reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When the designers are alone in the sewing room, trading catty insults, hemming until their fingers bleed, Fashion Show feels like great guilty pleasure TV. But when the sewing-room door opens, you can't help expecting--and wishing--that it'll be Tim Gunn.
  1. Though the series drags whenever it becomes bogged down in political aspects of the fight, it’s inherently entertaining to see such back-stabbing, and possibly literal stabbing, between supposed loved ones.
  2. 'Klondike' is not going to win awards for its lackluster screenplay and penchant for melodrama, but it does have some of the plucky energy you’d enjoy at one of those faux-saloon dinner theaters, where the gradations between good and bad hardly exist. It comes across almost like a musical without any songs, and before long, you’re swept up in its crisp visuals and steady pace.
  3. Sherlock is too often a petulant know-it-all, which grows tiresome and makes a viewer painfully aware that each episode is 90 minutes long.... Sherlock's redundancies are improved by a couple of longer story arcs.
  4. Little Britain USA isn't precisely the same television show that's been slaying audiences and collecting awards in England and Australia for the past several years, but it's close.
  5. Orphan Black has apparently just scraped the surface--not only with the overall narrative arc but with the depth of character development in each of the clones that Maslany plays.... [However] It is chewing so voraciously through its story lines--at such a rapid pace--that it often verges on collapse.
  6. "Love Monkey" is easy to dismiss yet hard to dislike.
  7. Ostensibly an objective inquiry into the tragedy, the film is perhaps better interpreted as a study in the infinite and even seemingly inappropriate ways that people experience profound grief.
  8. Even with the cross-pond cultural differences, young adults who are perennially baffled by their aging boomer parents will feel right at home here.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With what appears to be an infinite number of deadly viruses out there, viewers can only hope the FBI can pinpoint them all.
  9. Mad Men is fading away as beautifully--even indifferently--as one would expect.
  10. Fallon complies, respectfully and skillfully, with The Tonight Show's apparently inviolable formats (the opening monologue of jokes; the fact that at least part of the show must be conducted from his desk) as a bridge to the more goofy and innovative sketch comedy he prefers. He keeps looking for ways to delight us, surprise us. It can so easily stray into irritation--and the yawning brought on by all the fawning--but you can’t really fault the guy for trying to send people to bed happy.
  11. The show seems markedly improved from its earlier efforts and somehow more confident in its writing and sense of nuance. It's also funnier.
  12. The show misses its mark--but not by much and not in any objectionable way.
  13. Go On moves quite breezily--much like an NBC-flavored take on premium cable dramadies such as "The Big C" and "Enlightened." It's not as good as either of those, but it has the same happy-sad aura, with just a dash of "Community"-like absurdity to keep the speed limit up.
  14. It may be a case of going too far but in such a crazy-daisy way that it can't help but be entertaining. [2 Oct 2004]
    • Washington Post
  15. Enough happens to keep you from changing the channel, but there are hints of a show that could get dull fast.
  16. Henderson gives a lunky, forgettable performance, coming nowhere near anyone's idea of a stronger, meaner version of J.R. Thanks to the rest of its ensemble, however, the new Dallas gains some traction and kicks up a little dust.
  17. Foster makes for an energetic and engaging lead, never missing a beat; the rest of the cast is equally snappy-snippy, thanks to scripts and story lines that keep everyone prancing along like trained poodles.
  18. Do we ever feel as if we're really there, in Henry's court, half a millennium ago? Perhaps not, but a splendid cast and sumptuous production details make "The Tudors" a rollicking and resplendent show, if never a deeply affecting one.
  19. This is by no means the first Comedy Central show about a guy comedian in Hollywood engaged in convenient pseudo-sketches about the rain clouds hanging over him. But it’s the first one in a long time that feels like it has something real to say.
  20. Most of the actors make their characters zesty and likable, if on occasion too glib for their -- and our -- own good.
  21. This new drama has bad dialogue to spare, too, which mars an otherwise distinctive, better-than-average police show.
  22. It’s a well-meaning, good-humored, hospitable hour of television, reminiscent of the nascent days of cable reality shows in the early 2000s, before everyone figured out that ratings success meant being nasty, famous and selfish.
  23. It sounds gimmicky and visually tedious, with most of the so-called action taking place in a conference room. It's all those things, but the moments of misery make it memorable.
  24. A wickedly entertaining show.
  25. Viewers are in for another high-powered pulse-pounder. [29 Oct 2002]
    • Washington Post
  26. While it's not perfect, Bunheads is a happy find, a ray of authenticity on a summer TV schedule filled with so much artificial light.
  27. Remarkable for one reason only: It achieves levels of warmth that are rare for such shows. It may not make everybody laugh, but a decent human being would have a hard time not smiling. [22 Sept 1989, p.B1]
    • Washington Post
  28. The plot and subplots of the premiere eventually deteriorate into pandemonium, but McCormack remains the steadying center that makes the show intelligible and, more important, involving. And, perhaps more important still, fun.

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