Andrew O'Hehir

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For 1,485 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 The Trip
Lowest review score: 0 The Replacements
Score distribution:
1485 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    While this does not strike me as the most urgent element of Standard Operating Procedure, Morris makes a persuasive case that many of the Abu Ghraib photos don't show us what we think they do, and that some of the episodes depicted were staged specifically to be photographed (and might not otherwise have occurred).
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A charming comedy with a philosophical undercurrent that provides a fascinating glimpse of Jerusalem's ultra-Orthodox Jews, who live in a realm almost literally sealed off from outsiders. But the most remarkable thing about the film is that it exists at all.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Walk is much less than the sum of its parts, except when the parts are so good you can’t ignore them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An important human and artistic testament -- a calm meditation on something no one can consider calmly.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Thankfully, this information arrives via a graceful and frequently humorous film that captures the idiosyncrasies of its characters and never hectors.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's literally difficult to believe that the person who made this picturesque, clueless, oddly misanthropic picture also made "Annie Hall" and "Crimes and Misdemeanors."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    An explosive wide-screen vision of the street life of Soweto, bursting with music, danger and vitality, and the extraordinary story of a ruthless young criminal known only as Tsotsi.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A terrifying and highly effective documentary.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    To sum it all up, The Nice Guys is basically “Chinatown” remade by Quentin Tarantino and starring foulmouthed, updated versions of Abbott and Costello, as played by two of the most recognizable male stars of our time.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the great things about Scott Thurman's film - a low-budget but thoroughly watchable documentary, largely funded on Kickstarter – is that it helped me see the world from McLeroy's point of view, which I might previously have considered impossible.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's an impressive film, beautifully photographed and marvelously acted. But is it more than a set of undeniably gorgeous affectations?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This yarn about an innocent-looking but desperately horny teenage girl might not have that much commercial upside, but its bittersweet, faintly depressed brand of Nordic humor is definitely enjoyable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sleep Tight, first of all, is a nifty new Euro-horror film, with several wicked-cold Hitchcockian twists, that shows off the range and craft of terrific Spanish director Jaume Balagueró, co-founder of the "[Rec]" franchise (still the gold standard in found-footage horror).
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a profoundly moving story of -- yes! -- the human spirit rising above horrible circumstances, and simultaneously a work of nostalgia for the gentlemen's war that marked the end, or the beginning of the end, of Christian Europe's world domination.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A nerve-jangling work of visual poetry and ironic juxtaposition, and a powerful human story of a group of brave young Americans.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's as stylish and kinky as you could want, but compared to his recent female-centric melodramas ("Broken Embraces," "Volver," "All About My Mother"), this is a chilly genre exercise that casts his obsession with gender and sexuality in a harsh new light.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Another remarkable chapter in the career of Asia's most important living filmmaker. After "Pan's Labyrinth," this is the movie to see this season.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Tense, hilarious and totally serendipitous.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A loving tribute to one of the strangest and most enjoyable figures to emerge from American pop culture in its entire history.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    No one who sees it will confuse it with anything else. Fans of Gondry's DIY low-tech aesthetic, which he blends, as always, with exceptionally sophisticated animation techniques, will adore it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    You could describe Love Songs, as a blend of François Truffaut's wistful Parisian sentimentalism and Pedro Almodóvar's acrid polysexual comedy, which were never far apart to begin with (given the difference in climate and native temperament between France and Spain).
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    An extraordinary social comedy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lynn Hershman hasn't reached much of an audience, which makes the modest national rollout of her fascinating Strange Culture a noteworthy event.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It needs to seem cool enough that we want to watch it despite its obvious silliness, and viewed through that prism of canny analysis, the craftsmanship of “Winter Soldier” is first rate.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    [An] evenhanded and carefully crafted documentary.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    By the end of Who Killed the Electric Car? you'll be worked into a lather one way or another. Paine crams in more theories, ideas and arguments than the movie can easily hold, but that's OK with me.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Simply too bright and pleasant to become a huge hit, but it's a confident little genre film with near-classic charm.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This may test your patience, it's not for everyone, it's a stretch to call this "entertainment" and so on. As far as Heathcliff being black – well, deal with it. Arnold's simply right about that one, and it's Laurence Olivier and Ralph Fiennes and all those costume-drama versions of the story that are wrong.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A movie that is never elegant but is often hysterically funny, and maintains a rabbit-on-speed pace that Hollywood comedy long ago abandoned.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Uprooted from their home soil, González Iñárritu and screenwriter Guillermo Arriaga can't quite manage to make this gloomy, improbable stew of romance, film noir and pseudo-metaphysical speculation hang together.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a reassuring and delicious film, but in no sense an adventurous one.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The best film in the alien attack, conspiracy theory, "Silence of the Lambs" rip-off, disgraced-cop drama, deranged circus wirewalker, anti-capitalist parable genre I've seen this year.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This movie's too small and too dark to have gotten Harrelson into the overcrowded best-actor race, but it's without question one of the year's great performances.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A bit pedantic, but thorough and interesting throughout, a must for history buffs.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A chilly, fascinating thriller at odds with itself.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Often hilarious, although I found it so amped-up and overly broad that I was exhausted before the movie was over.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The summer season's most surprising and thought-provoking documentary.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A subtle, witty, wise and deeply compassionate American movie.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's the most ambitious and impressive Coen film in at least a decade, featuring the flat, sun-blasted landscapes of west Texas -- spectacularly shot by cinematographer Roger Deakins -- and an eerily memorable performance by Javier Bardem, in a Ringo Starr haircut.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Watching a movie about the late trash-TV pioneer turns out to be fascinating, even when his story is told as messily as it is here.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Director Mark Romanek captures the slightly seedy and rundown reality of '70s and '80s British life in astonishing and even tragic detail; this is more like a period piece than a science-fiction movie.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I hate to criticize anybody for artistic ambition, but the problem with Babel isn't that it's a bad movie. It's a good movie, or, more accurately, it's several pieces of good movie, chopped up in service of a pretentious, portentous and slightly silly artistic vision.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If a movie can be both exciting and boring at the same time, that movie would be Unstoppable an adrenaline-infused runaway-train flick that perfectly distills director Tony Scott's talents and limitations.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Moms and girls everywhere deserve this movie, absolutely, and I hope they have a great time. But they also deserve much more, and much better.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A delicate tapestry of suburban gothic, romance and realism, with a surprising sweetness at its core and a wonderful star performance from Emma Roberts.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the finest cops-and-robbers thrillers of recent years.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This warm, graceful and fundamentally optimistic movie snuck up on me, in the best possible way.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Talky but fascinating period drama.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Black Gold is more an Al Gore-style message of hope than a total downer.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    You could call Just Another Love Story nothing more than an exercise in style, but A) Bornedal's got style to burn and B) that's not quite fair. Beneath all the dazzling cinematography, propulsive score and overcommitted acting, I found this movie an affecting, mordant comedy about male midlife crisis in its most extreme form.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Donald Rumsfeld, then, is almost the perfect foil or adversary to Morris, and part of the absurd magic of Morris’ extended interviews with Rumsfeld is that they almost never feel adversarial.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ang Lee's dark and sober fable might be the most interesting and least dogmatic view of the Civil War to wend its way into the multiplexes.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The story of how La Sierra moves from a seemingly pointless war to an unexpected peace is a thrilling one, although the impact of seeing what becomes of these three kids is devastating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    What I see in The Avengers, unfortunately, is a diminished film despite its huge scale, and kind of a bore.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Some of American Hardcore is amusing -- many of the aging punks Rachman and Blush track down have turned into highly ordinary middle-aged Americans -- and some is profoundly disturbing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Only viewers with some appreciation for the odd, bloodless character of moneyed family life in New York will really understand how hilarious and deadly accurate this movie is. But then again, New York parents are the last people who will want to see it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    I also understood that while this movie is deliberately constructed so that almost nobody will “get it” or like it – and I’m not sure how I feel about that perversity – it’s a masterpiece despite that, or because of that or just anyway.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Crisply and competently filmed, Tell No One is an intriguing sample of new-school French cinema at the more commercial end of the spectrum.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite its slick packaging and overtly facetious premise, director Matthew Cooke and producer Adrian Grenier’s faux-educational documentary How to Make Money Selling Drugs packs a wallop.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The hectic, sprawling Fanfan la Tulipe eventually feels like too much -- too many goofy asides, too much Comédie Française hambone acting, too much gallantry and villainy, too much forced good cheer.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Absolute Wilson changed my views of Wilson as a person tremendously, and at least gave me some useful context for his art.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Gruesome and terrifying things happen in The Last Winter, but there's no gratuitous gore or torture, and the film's real power comes from its building sense that something really, really bad is ABOUT to happen.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Nathalie becomes a complicated three-handed game, far more concerned with the narcissistic, pornographic and mutually manipulative relationship between Catherine and Nathalie than with the latter's purported affair with Bernard. If you live in New York, run, don't walk to see this on the big screen, because it won't be there long.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Almost utterly defeated by its subject's sardonic stonewalling.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There have been dozens of Holocaust documentaries, and one could well argue that the world doesn't need another. But Michèle Ohayon's Steal a Pencil for Me offers a simple human story of dignity, levity and romance.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a tragicomic fable about an all-too-real social predicament rather a wish-fulfillment fantasy, and the tragic result may be that hardly anyone notices how good it is, or the sickest, weirdest, most triumphant performance of Wiig’s career.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Mamet's trademark artificial, mutual-incomprehension dialogue and con-game plotting are ineptly matched to the action genre (and feel stale in any case), while the jiu-jitsu scenes are so incoherently shot and edited you can't tell if the fight choreography is any good or not.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Riveting jigsaw-puzzle documentary.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a strange and murky movie, at times a frustrating one, but I also found it profoundly moving in a way no regular thriller ever is.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I found this dark odyssey through an amoral dream Brooklyn curiously invigorating; it’s a masterful construction that held me rapt from first shot to last, that builds intense electrical energy and then releases it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A lot of this is compelling, after its didactic and heavily thematic fashion, but if you strip most of it away, along with Roger Deakins' handsome cinematography, you're left with the conflict between Jack and Bobby and something like "Shop Class as Soulcraft: The Movie."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    In its best moments, and they are considerable, Chicago 10 makes you see 1968, that near-apocalyptic year, with fresh eyes, as an extraordinary turning point in history now at least partly set free from boomer nostalgia and regret.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Highly entertaining, from minute to minute, and its semi-mythical portrayal of Torontonian life is entirely charming. If you can stand massive doses of cute and clever, it's a fine use for your summer-movie dollar (whether or not that dollar has a funny old lady on it).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Formally, Klores film is a standard-issue documentary, combining period footage with talking-head interviews. But his talking heads are a hoot -- leathery, leisure-suited, foul-mouthed, larger-than-life characters, straight out of the Bronx by way of Palm Beach -- and their story is a Gothic yarn of obsession, crime and forgiveness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    No single film or book can dispel the cloud of enigma surrounding Kurt Cobain, but simply sitting in the dark and hearing him talk to you for 90 minutes, while the dreary gray-green beauty of his home state moves through your eyeballs and into your brain, goes a pretty long way.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Primo Levi's Journey is a profound meditation on the unevenness of history, reminding us -- as Faulkner once remarked -- that the past not only isn't dead, it isn't really past at all.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The problem with Seitzman's script is how predictable almost all of it feels.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lake and Epstein are not in fact trying to stigmatize other women's choices about how and where to give birth. Instead, they're trying to introduce an entire universe of history and information that should inform those choices, and that the medical establishment has virtually erased from American memory.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I really don't understand why anybody thinks the wispy, bittersweet tale of long-distance love in Like Crazy is any big deal. Seriously, I liked this movie better last year, when it had Drew Barrymore in it and was called "Going the Distance."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Hunger Games has some cool moments here and there, and is never entirely dreadful. Lawrence is both radiant and triumphant. They haven't screwed it up badly enough to kill it, although they've tried.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The tremendous power of Aronofsky's filmmaking -- its omnivorous omnipotence, if that makes any sense -- has the curious effect of diluting its emotional impact.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    A pitch-perfect blend of darkness and sweetness, built around a masterful performance by a great actor.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Applause may present as gritty European realism, but the struggle inside Thea is almost theological in scale, and worthy of Milton or Kierkegaard.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The heart of the movie is not in its plot but in its characters and atmosphere. Castaneda, a nonprofessional actor who runs a towing company in San Antonio, gives a towering, Robert Duvall-style performance as a granitic man in late middle age whose internal world of pain and love and knowledge occasionally flickers to the surface.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Highly entertaining and skillful documentary.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Richer and more enjoyable than the other lame-stream comedies Hollywood has churned out this summer, even though it doesn't know what kind of movie it wants to be when it grows up.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    Mythic, thrilling and brilliantly made motion picture.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    A relentlessly gruesome, visually impressive and ultimately not very interesting movie with some pretensions to seriousness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Although I personally still find the rubber-faced, pseudo-human figures produced by this technique unsettling, the work done by Spielberg and Jackson's animation teams here is exquisite.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    As a ninth-generation descendant of Abigail Faulkner, a convicted Salem witch who only escaped execution because she was pregnant at the time, I call down a terrible malediction upon the people who made this entertaining but indefensible movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    Jones, as always, knows what he’s doing. In only his second feature as a director, the laconic 68-year-old star has made a wrenching, relentless and anti-heroic western that stands among the year’s most powerful American films. Not everyone will like The Homesman, but if you see it you won’t soon forget it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    There are so many great things happening on almost every level of this movie, from Swinton's haunting, magnetic and tremendously vulnerable performance, which is absolutely free of condescension to the suburban American wife-ness of her character, to the many unsettling individual moments.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s more that the filmmakers close out this oddly inspiring yarn of apocalypse and paranoia with a note of false reassurance. Yes, the world is fundamentally screwed and most people are apathetic or paralyzed. So start ringing doorbells!
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    An engaging entertainment that packages its thought-provoking ideas in a combination of political thriller, comic adventure and romantic triangle.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A tantalizing and beautiful picture made with tremendous integrity, and anchored by two marvelous performances, Isabel Coixet's The Secret Life of Words still, somehow, doesn't quite work.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Finally, at the risk of seeming provincial, why is it OK that some Canadian has made a movie set in Ireland with no Irish people among the principal cast?
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I hope viewers don’t come away from this essential documentary with the belief that Western AIDS activists in general turned their backs on poor black people just as soon as they got medicine that worked. That isn’t remotely fair. Blame for the African AIDS holocaust falls on the Big Pharma companies who put patents and profits ahead of human life, and on all of us who let them get away with it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    My personal view is that Quentin Tarantino is now permanently high on his own supply, but you could just as well say that he has succeeded in reinventing the art film. Is it worth it to put yourself through the brutal and incoherent three-hour ordeal of The Hateful Eight for its moments of brilliance and its ultimate catharsis? Jesus, don’t look at me.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Its characters and its nowheresville setting are uncannily realized... It's not a cartoon in any sense, but an honest-to-God movie with some fine, understated acting and a human heart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Take This Waltz is frank, erotic, often very funny and sometimes startling, with an underlying tragic sensibility.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    If this isn’t quite a great movie, it should be an immensely gratifying one for sci-fi fans tired of the conceptual overkill and general dumbness of “Prometheus” or “Star Trek Into Darkness.”
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Beautifully executed, loaded with sharp observational moments, and never cheats either its characters or its audience by descending into raunchy teen-movie cliché. This is a delicately balanced and often very funny holiday alternative suitable for pretty much the entire family.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Client 9 plays a lot like a murky, gripping political thriller, it lacks a fully satisfying ending -- or a fully satisfying hero.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A film that stands out for its passion, ambition and clarion-call sincerity, even amid the contemporary onslaught of political documentaries.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    When it's all over and you don't have to spend any more time smoking pot with Karl and Bill in their horrid little house, you may feel the elation of tragic catharsis. Then again, you may feel as if you just drank a bottle of drain opener; the difference between those states is subtle.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I kind of enjoyed Rise of the Planet of the Apes despite its evident silliness and the fact that nobody's likely to remember it three weeks from now.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a dense and sophisticated work about mortality, materialism, madness, jealousy and pity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Greenwald isn't capable of the magisterial, mournful manner of, say, Eugene Jarecki's "Why We Fight," but the two films would make a natural double bill.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Among DiCillo's best, and returns to the central theme of his career: the elusive and destructive nature of fame.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Honeydripper offers a leisurely, atmospheric production with lots of time to appreciate his largely African-American cast, along with rocking musical interludes and just the faintest wash of spirituality.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    As a pure head-trip visual and auditory experience it feels like one of the biggest discoveries, and biggest surprises, of 2014.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A memorable, haunting and highly original American movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A spiny, puzzling and highly entertaining film, and whatever you go into it thinking, you're likely to come out thinking something else.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I never stopped being interested in The Place Beyond the Pines, and never stopped rooting for Cianfrance to make the hubristic ambition of his immense tripartite scheme pay off, even as it evidently falls apart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Rossi's film makes a compelling case on behalf of the traditional values of journalism.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fratricide marks Arslan as one of Europe's hottest young talents, drawing simultaneously on the film traditions of America, Western Europe and the Middle East.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A sunny, cheerful, thoroughly artificial concoction, going nowhere with no particular speed. Still, better than your average airplane movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    After this movie, the Beasties and their fans, camera-totin' or not, are left drenched, exhausted, delighted.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A highly original and at times thrilling use of the documentary medium, and one of the most revealing films about the troubled nature of contemporary manhood I've ever seen.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Just a string of ludicrous excuses to get from one outrageous comedy set-piece to the next.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's the film's reassuring, almost hypnotic visual rhythms, along with its Hollywood-like narrative structure -- which is closer to "Drumline" or "Bring It On" than to most documentaries -- that make it bearable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s so much delusion and so much delight in Noah that I have trouble distinguishing one from the other, or determining whether its most outlandish flourishes qualify as mistakes or as strokes of genius.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    Scorsese is pushing, I guess, for something that combines a '40s horror-thriller with a contemporary psychological tragedy. What he ends up with is more like a Hardy Boys mystery directed by David Lynch.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    For all its grandeur, Gladiator is a canned experience, a film that flails around awkwardly trying to find a reason to exist, or at least a compelling story to tell.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A delicate and affecting drama with grace notes of mystery and redemption.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Beckinsale tackles the downscale role manfully, but Rockwell is nearly unrecognizable as the pudgy, suicidally depressed, chronically inept Glenn, who's acting out a half-convincing portrayal of himself as a born-again Christian.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Robot & Frank is such a sly, dry, modest-seeming picture – part science fiction, part social satire, part geriatric comedy – that you don't realize how well it works until it's over.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Dark, hilarious and oddly moving.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Been Rich All My Life is something like the "Ballets Russes" of tap dancing. I'm delighted to report that the similarities include the fact that the Belles are transmitting their improvisatory "rhythm tap" style to generations of younger dancers.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    As long as Klapisch keeps his characters pinballing each other from one Euro-capital to the next, Russian Dolls remains fun and charming, without ever seeming remotely serious or meaningful.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed the hell out of it for a while, but it got irritating and self-congratulatory long before it was over and I desperately do not want to see it again.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sound of My Voice has such creepy-crawly, brain-tickling energy that I wanted a much bigger payoff out of the final collision of all these people and episodes. Maybe they're saving that for the sequel.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fahrenheit 9/11 is more like a drug experience than a political documentary. It's a mind-bending, half-digested mass of video clips, interviews, statistics, rampant speculation and the cheap gags Moore has never been able to resist.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Nearly as enjoyable as the original. Its not-so-secret weapon is the poised, calm performance of Yen, who somehow manages to play Ip as both character and archetype.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    So the rhetorical strategy of The Armstrong Lie is both a strength and a weakness. Gibney’s films have always been about truth, lies and power, but for the first time he finds himself in the ambiguous philosophical terrain of Errol Morris, exploring the lies we tell ourselves.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A prodigious, almost spiritual experience, a luminous, challenging art movie out of the Tarkovsky school that happens to be about a real war and its effects on real children.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Delpy's writing is sharply observed and often hilarious, and her own performance as the perennially enraged Marion -- whom she says was inspired by Robert De Niro's Jake LaMotta in "Raging Bull" -- is one of her most memorable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a meticulous nest of interlocking elements, not at all haphazard. But in its unrelieved bleakness and singularity of vision, it supplies very little in the way of conventional movieness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Supremely economical, pulse-pounding and undeniably bewildering thriller, which plays like a blend of mid-'90s Hong Kong action flick and mid-'70s European crime drama. Arguably this movie amounts to less than the sum of its parts - but hot damn, those are some parts.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I appreciated and admired the craftsmanship of Jellyfish more than I loved it, and I found its whimsical, magic-realist touches a bit cloying. Just as I began to appreciate that it had depths I hadn't perceived, it was over.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lynch offers a fascinating view of Lynch's irascible personality (and insatiable appetite for coffee and cigarettes), and captures him discussing his formative years in Idaho and Philadelphia, as well as his 30-year involvement with Transcendental Meditation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    An ingenious construction, much cleverer in psychological and symbolic terms than the story it tells, which mixes a schematic thriller and an on-the-nose fable about the corruption of American politics.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I suspect this guy can make a good movie if he learns the right lessons; he's made about half of one here. But the praise heaped upon A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints is way too much, way too soon.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If at first I tried to resist these hapless Pennsylvania teens who'd never even heard of David Bowie, for Christ's sake, I was won over completely by the time Patrick and Sam are ready to graduate and Charlie has faced down his demons one more time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The simplicity and profundity of that faith, and the unquestionable nobility of Judge's death, are well captured here.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It leaves you with provocative questions and memorable images rather than neatly wrapped answers, and with that feeling of imprecise mystery I remember so well from my own youthful experiences: Something beautiful and evanescent just happened, or almost happened. But you can’t describe it, and if you try to seize it, it vanishes into sand and salt and sun.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's terrific! Shot by the brilliant cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle ("Dogville," "28 Days Later," etc.) and anchored by amazing performances from identical (but not conjoined) twins Harry and Luke Treadaway, Brothers of the Head is not a freak show, or a knockoff "Rocky Horror" camp celebration. It's a work of powerful atmosphere and significant mystery. Plus, it rocks.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Damsels in Distress is deliberately and purposefully irrelevant; its irrelevance is its strength. It's zany-in-quotation-marks and also flat-out zany. I laughed until I cried, and you may too (if you don't find it pointless and teeth-grindingly irritating). Either way, Whit Stillman is back at last, bringing his peculiar brand of counterprogramming refreshment to our jaded age.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Scott Thomas' delicate, ferocious performance captures a woman quietly at war with herself, who begins to realize that her vision of respectability may not fit the remarkable young man in her care.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a funny, strange, sad and wonderful picture, packed with delightful performances by Hollywood stars and made by a director with a startling facility for the form and an expansive cinematic imagination.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Perhaps the most startling aspect of Suffragette, which for better or worse is a standard-issue historical drama, well constructed but not especially capacious or original, is its depiction of how far female activists were willing to go in order to prove that they could stand alongside men.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Appreciate it instead as an exceedingly well-crafted fairy tale, alive with eccentric, overdrawn Dickensian characters and irresistibly wholehearted sentiment, and you'll enjoy perhaps the most accomplished and satisfying work of Brooks' career as a middlebrow entertainer.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The 21st-century combo of screwball comedy and half-baked thriller in Wild Canaries isn’t exactly like anything you’ve seen before, and it offers an unpredictable ride that’s kind of fun, or at least sporadically simulates fun.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    A fascinating, mature, beautifully crafted work of art, from a director who continues to surprise us. Sofia Coppola has absorbed the Italian avant-garde more completely than her father ever did, and has made a film about celebrity in the vein of Antonioni and Bertolucci, a film about Hollywood in which she turns her back on it, possibly forever.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a fine example of the excellence of French genre film right now: A dark tale of revenge with an inscrutable heart, ice in its veins and an electric undercurrent of eroticism, it also might be the best-photographed picture I've seen so far this year.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's mediocre and half-baked, with flashes of a potential good movie showing through here and there.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a magnificent miniature, a supremely tender work that's full of emotion and even sentimentality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is another mini-triumph from the resurgent Irish film industry, but much more than that it's a resonant yarn of love, loss, loneliness -- and things that go bump in the night.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's no disputing the ingenuity and even the brilliance of this mind-bending mashup, which begins as a gritty recession-era marriage drama - the opening scene features a couple arguing about whether they have the money to get the Jacuzzi fixed - and then descends into ominous violence and finally total insanity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The damn thing is, Ridley very nearly makes this insuperable obstacle work to his benefit. He delivers a flawed, ambitious and deeply peculiar portrait of one of the 20th century’s most enigmatic musical talents, in the year before he ascended to rock-god status, that resembles no other pop-music biopic you’ve ever seen.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's way too much plot here getting in the way of the story, which makes it tough for Alfredson and cinematographer Peter Mokrosinski to focus on the series' strongest elements. Of course it's the character of Lisbeth that has made these books and movies into a worldwide phenomenon.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you can tolerate watching it once, it will burrow into your brain and never get out again; your only recourse will be dragging your friends into the nightmare and seeing it again.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Unmistaken Child stands above most others in offering us an intimate look at Tibetan Buddhism in action, with no external commentary or narration.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A scared-straight after-school special, but actually good.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pedestrian but appealing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Here’s the thing about Crimson Peak, which is lurid and ghastly and immensely enjoyable and frequently spectacular and also thinner and less substantial than it wants to be, like a meal eaten in a dream.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed Age of Ultron more than its predecessor, despite the fact that it’s almost exactly the same thing. This was probably a result of adjusting my expectations: I wasn’t sitting there waiting for Whedon to revolutionize the genre, or to turn an overdetermined comic-book movie into a Noel Coward comedy. He delivers a clean and capable entertainment, with a handful of distinctive flourishes stuck to the margins.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Captain America is exactly what the third week of July needed: a curiously fun, surprisingly imaginative and unashamedly old-fashioned yarn of skulduggery and adventure.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pretty damned irresistible. What begins as a winning workout in a highly familiar genre -- the white-ethnic, big-city family comedy -- gradually gains both screwball momentum and emotional power, and delivers an unexpected punch by the time it reaches its climactic pileup of characters and revelations.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Frequently beautiful and intermittently haunting and could be called a meditation on aging and mortality, an intimate study of a peculiar variety of fame and a portrait of a genuinely remarkable person.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    I hated this movie; I wish I could unsee it and will it out of existence. But that’s not the same as thinking it’s worthless or corrupt or entirely inept. It’s more like a massively self-indulgent prank, inflicted on the world by some reasonably intelligent young men, which makes it the most bro-tastic project of all time. Mo’ bro than this, no es posible, amigos.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 Andrew O'Hehir
    If The Cell were six minutes long it would blow your mind. At two hours, it's a disordered muddle of hellacious highs and pedestrian lows.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    A limp and dreary experience, at least after you get past its intriguing premise. It's poorly written and woodenly acted, completely formulaic and hopelessly imprisoned by both its genre and finally its form.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's both a supremely controlled exercise in form and tone and an intriguing exploration of the ways new technology intersects with age-old questions of dominance, control and individuality, particularly in the school setting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s no ordinary movie: Rabin, the Last Day is a disorienting mixture of drama, documentary and meticulous re-creation, and very little of it takes place on the last day of Rabin’s life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The film has moments of real brilliance and pathos; flawed as it is, Seven Psychopaths isn't like anything else you'll see this year, or any other.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is not one of those Eisenhower-Little Rock moments where you get to feel warm and fuzzy about the power of the state being on the right side of history.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Not for the first time in his career, Soderbergh has made a mainstream film that is simultaneously a thought experiment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A subtle, underplayed psychological drama with terrific work by all three actors.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a sweet, lively and funny movie rather than a fully realized one, but it makes clear that Gordon-Levitt has a natural feeling for cinema and should do more of it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Although I have mixed feelings about The Eye, there's no question the Pangs have a natural talent for cinema. They create bright, unfussy images and work terrifically with actors.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    But imagination and energy are often not enough. On balance, this is the dumbest of the entries in Hollywood's anti-consumerist new wave.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An alternately charming and frustrating comic entertainment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    While excellent in many technical respects, is a muted, pretty, anesthetic concoction that's never fully satisfying.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Trapero makes naturalistic films with plenty of sex, violence and dark humor; in Carancho you can see the influence of 1950s film noir, the ballsy renegades of 1970s American cinema (especially early Martin Scorsese) and a little touch of the Coen brothers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The wonder of Sherrybaby is that we can admire Sherry's exuberance and evident love of life -- and the extraordinary actress who portrays her -- without really being sure where she's going.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An oddly graceful combination of fairy tale and romantic comedy, set in a forgotten corner of the world.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is no art film, but Edel and Eichinger supply an action-packed, reasonably coherent account of youthful rock 'n' roll idealism run amok, and how it produced the craziest phenomenon of the crazy European far left.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    An impressive but exceptionally disturbing feature debut from Australian director Justin Kurzel that pushes the new wave of Aussie crime films up a notch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a rip-snorting, barrel-riding adventure movie — perfect for all ages, as they say (though it isn’t for very young kids) — loaded with fast-paced fight scenes, great-looking effects and enjoyable and/or scurrilous supporting characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lee Daniels’ The Butler is big, brave, crude and contradictory, very bad in places and very good in others, and every American should see it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fast Five is a fantasy that in no way resembles real life; ordinary morality doesn't apply, and the audience knows that as well as the filmmakers do.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you're willing to take this voyage with Fiennes into the psychic landscape and working life of one of the world's greatest contemporary artists, it's a trip you'll never forget.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Horror fans will celebrate Stake Land, and future horror-film directors should go to school on it. The flame is still burning -- and it keeps the undead away, at least for a while.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An engaging, well-made docu that admirably captures the singular importance of its subject.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Dark, sleek, funny and creepily infectious, the genetic-engineering horror-comedy Splice is a dynamic comeback vehicle for Canadian genre director Vincenzo Natali, who made a splash a few years ago with "Cube."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Following four players through the first season of Miller's regime, Browne captures not just a high-energy sports spectacle played out in the bowling megaplexes of outer suburbia but, even more interestingly, a clash of cultures between bowling's hallowed past and its possible future.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s nothing disgraceful about The One I Love, and if you’re just in the mood for a VOD time-waster, you could do worse. But despite the agreeable lead performances, it doesn’t quite repay your 90 lost minutes of life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pretty good summer flick!
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Assaf’s pop-culture transcendence was a coming-of-age moment for Palestinians, a sign that they could triumph in the most delicious, delightful and unlikely of contexts, despite a broken society built on institutional hopelessness. Abu-Assad’s films make the same point, in a darker register.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The movie is a hilarious, riveting must-see about a family as it breaks down almost all the way and then reinvents itself.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Aladag's point, I think, is that no matter how righteous we may feel about this kind of zero-sum cultural collision, for the human beings involved it often results in unbearable tragedy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Hope Springs is an oddly ambitious blend of bland humor and startling insight into the realities of married life. It's something like Ingmar Bergman's "Scenes From a Marriage," as translated into the universe of the Lifetime Network.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Soderbergh's film is probably not the equal of either Tarkovsky's 1972 predecessor or the memorably Byzantine prose of Lem's novel, but in the end, almost despite himself, this able craftsman has made a brave and lovely companion piece to both of them. His ending is pure cinema at its most marvelous and moving.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Not a major Herzog work or one that will draw a large audience, but a must-see for those who suspect (as I do) that he's one of the greatest talents now working in this medium.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A remarkably evenhanded story about an eager young activist who was drawn down a slippery slope toward property destruction and violence, and who wound up as a baffled defendant in a widely publicized federal terrorism case.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a conventional political documentary with a conventional view of what happened in the Buckeye State and why, but it's no less fascinating for all that.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A potent and well-executed drama.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    A trashy thriller of the kind that used to make up the second half of double bills in crumbling downtown theaters, circa 1977.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It might be too slow and morbid for American viewers without an existing interest in the subject.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Terrifically acted, reassuringly formulaic, and moderately amusing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lovett's film is a finely balanced and loving work of history, which never tries to sugarcoat elements of the explosion of gay sexuality three decades ago that may seem excessive or disturbing to some contemporary viewers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    About midway through Denzel Washington's new film The Great Debaters comes a raw and terrifying scene that exemplifies why the movie's worth seeing, despite its hackneyed and awkward story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Is it, on some level, '70s-style horror schlock dressed up with contemporary gimmicks? Sure, but don't act like that's a bad thing! It's schlock with honor, schlock with a conscience, schlock that speaks to the way we live now.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I wish one-tenth of the films I saw were made with this much craft and integrity, this much intuitive understanding of where to put the camera, how much of the story to explain in words (not much) and how much to trust his outstanding cast to carry the film with their voices, faces and bodies.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a tantalizing case study that suggests ordinary people still have the power to steer a course between faceless bureaucracies and greedy capitalists, but only just - and only if they can find a way to overcome their differences and work together.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a tepidly amusing film that will offend no one, including those it claims to skewer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The universe of The Dead Girl is an almost uniformly dreary one, whose women are all either dowdy or whorish.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    As to the question of whether Circumstance is actually a good film, or just one with an important story to tell, a high degree of difficulty and some hot all-girl action, I think the verdict is mixed.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This movie may not have the highest production values you've ever seen, but it's the work of an artist, one whose view of America, history and the awkwardness of human life is generous and deep.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Gerardo Naranjo's deliriously trashy Drama/Mex may not do much to burnish the international prestige of Mexican cinema, but it's an entertaining blend of obvious influences, from softcore cable-TV porn to Tarantino to "Less Than Zero" and "Leaving Las Vegas."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pawn Sacrifice sticks admirably close to the facts of that peculiar historical moment, and features a showboat performance from Tobey Maguire as the increasingly disturbed Fischer, along with a more composed one from Liev Schreiber as the taciturn Spassky.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Can I tell you exactly what happens in Memphis, or what it’s “about”? Absolutely not. But it worked its magic on me, and its meaning is something I take on faith.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    My Week With Marilyn is the kind of shtick-laden movie in the British TV mode that delivers all its laughs, and all its grand, declamatory moments, right on schedule. I'm delighted to recommend it, as long as you know what you're in for: "The King's Speech" has the subtlety of Chekhov in comparison.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Brash, bristling, highly watchable film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's enough to make you forgive a great deal of this film's dumbness and appreciate it as meaningless, goodhearted and mostly non-obnoxious entertainment.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Largely improvised, cast with ex-Marines and Iraqi refugees and shot in Jordan. It might just be the movie this war has been waiting for.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a daring, audacious and sometimes terrifying movie -- purely as a thrill ride, it's probably the summer's best offering so far. That doesn't mean it left me feeling entirely satisfied. There's an emptiness at the soul of Salt -- again, meaning both the movie and the character -- that's extremely disturbing, maybe on purpose.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Carrey provides one of his most whacked-out and enjoyable performances.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s also true that toward the end of a big series the story eats the stars, and everybody in this movie, even Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen, the Artemis-style revolutionary icon, is pretty much part of the furniture.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's refreshingly honest, depicts the kinds of American lives not often seen on-screen and shows us a familiar star in a striking new light.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s a highly enjoyable picture.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Made in Dagenham offers girl power in a can, lightly seasoned with swinging London and topped with cute-clumsy Sally Hawkins charming us to pieces. But the real women of Dagenham deserve better, and so do their sisters in the audience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I was startled to look up the running time and discover that X-Men: First Class is only 104 minutes; the second half is so clunky it feels much longer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Arias' blend of traditional cell animation and 3-D CGI effects is thoroughly mind-blowing, and the film's visual sensibility is utterly distinctive.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Another strong journalistic-style film, this one exposes how unbelievably rapacious the financial industries have become in extending credit to unlikely prospects -- among them college students, nursing-home residents, small children, dogs and dead people.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Undeniably clever.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A movie where style and craft are fatally confused with substance, and where almost no effort is made to make the characters seem like believable people.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    An electrically paced and brilliantly acted death-row thriller.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    This High-Rise is a scathing, intoxicating visual and auditory experience, the most truthful and most powerful Ballard adaptation we’ve ever seen, or are likely to.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Dismissed in some quarters as trash because it depicts a sexual act (of sorts) between two teenage girls, Water Lilies struck me instead as a hypnotic and wholly convincing look at teen culture from the inside, with all its courage, cruelty and unspoken codes of silence intact.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    An uneven but surprising movie, often outrageously funny and just as often completely flat.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It demands to be experienced on its own terms or not at all, which creates a significant level of resistance in the contemporary media marketplace – but may also be a source of counterintuitive appeal.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Certainly it isn't the greatest of Coppola's pictures, or even of his independent productions, but those are pretty high standards. It has a verve and vitality that's been missing from his pictures for 25 years, and its various and visible flaws all result from too much of that verve rather than too little. I enjoyed it tremendously.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    After the fundamental problem of Coherence has become clear, or clear-ish – there’s another dinner party, at that other house, that looks an awful lot like this one – the movie becomes slightly too much like an unfolding mathematical puzzle, although an ingenious one that reaches a chilling conclusion.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It takes discipline in this age of bloat to bring your movie in under 80 minutes, closing credits included, and still make the audience feel we’ve been taken on a genuine journey with these people, a few big laughs and jagged left turns included.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Hanna is almost a terrific movie, or a partly terrific one, but all its giddy, improvised wonder resolves into nothing more than a ruthless, symmetrical story about a murderous monster.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a noisy, chaotic, technology-crazed 21st-century action film, but also one made with tremendous excitement, vigor and heart, along with a myriad of wonderful details.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If it's all reasonably familiar indie-comedy terrain, it's delivered at a brisk, economical clip with plenty of laughs, and a series of running gags that keep getting funnier.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The seventh and last volume in J.K. Rowling's series of best-selling fantasy novels has been split in half for Hollywood purposes, making this long, dour, impressive and handsome motion picture the penultimate chapter, largely designed to build up the heavy-duty suspense before the climax is delivered next year.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I won't argue for the cinematic virtues of this film; they don't exist. But as a pseudo-documentary portrait of real life behind the explosive headlines, it's absorbing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If The Way is sometimes shaggy and inelegant, and flirts with sentimentality the whole way through, I was finally overcome by its dignity and sincerity, and by the rough, rude, gorgeous magic of its journey.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whatever we may make of van Gogh's life and death, Buscemi's talky, stagey Interview -- the first of three van Gogh adaptations planned by American actor-directors -- doesn't make much of a case for him as an important or original artist.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This version of the Potter saga is fun and harmless rather than memorable or imaginative. That's certainly no crime.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    By conducting her conversations in public spaces, and removing her interlocutors from desks and offices and book-lined studies and other appurtenances of intellectual authority, Taylor introduces a degree of playfulness and unpredictability that becomes the movie's M.O.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sleeping With Other People is one of the best and funniest recent attempts to update the rom-com – but the container feels too antiquated for the world it captures, which is so furiously alive.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Van Damme's remarkable performance -- I say this in all seriousness -- comes pretty close to redeeming the picture's murky and overly complicated artistic intentions.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A moving and profoundly upsetting portrait of life near the bottom of the global power pyramid.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a lovely film directed with delicacy and taste, profoundly alive to the rhythms of its actors and characters, which gives its superlative British cast of stage and screen legends the time and space they deserve.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    I really enjoyed watching Prometheus almost the whole way through, and I'm looking forward to seeing it again. It's an enjoyable thrill ride, slicked up with a thin veneer of Asking the Big Questions. But do its so-called heroes really have to be such blithering New Age idiots?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Candela Peña is sensational in the leading role, and the film is big-hearted, poetic, sweet, sad and romantic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Avenue Montaigne, is a delicious French pastry, tart and sweet, steeped in Parisian glamour.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Che
    I was never bored, in four hours-plus. Whether or not it ends up becoming a great film (or films), this is miles and miles beyond anything I thought Soderbergh could create from this material.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's by far the funniest and warmest movie Araki has ever made, with much less juvenile angst and much more command of his craft.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    So ingeniously constructed that these meta-noir ingredients feel dizzyingly enjoyable, never hackneyed. In fact, the overheated melodrama of Identity is crucial to its method -- and the key, in some ways, to its narrative secrets.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a deliberately chilly and nerve-wracking experience, and one of the bleakest portraits of American society seen on-screen in the last several decades.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Schizo is in its way a taut and exciting thriller.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    To give a performance this layered and complex and unstinting while also directing the film around it, which is risky and imaginative and full of life, testifies to impressive powers of concentration.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Like Ayer’s cop flicks, Fury is a gripping ride all the way through, if somewhat restricted in its emotional and visual range.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Dancer Upstairs, is a haunting and often beautiful work, part doomed romance and part political thriller, that demonstrates the adult command of the medium Malkovich has always demonstrated as an actor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If a movie can be fascinating and tedious at the same time, Inside Deep Throat -- which more or less depicts the America I have just described -- is that movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    At the risk of retreating into Waffle House aesthetic relativism, I think the unsettling power of Michael Winterbottom and Mat Whitecross' film stems from its contradictions.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    What's clear from the film is that there's a massive, almost tribal demand for O'Brien's brand of slightly more upscale comedy (maybe less so for his rock-star stylings), and also that being that famous doesn't do wonders for anyone's personality.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A penultimate chapter without a real ending, but it’s also a thrilling ride full of potent emotions, new characters and major twists of fate, built around another commanding star performance.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sheds some unexpected light on the uneven and still undigested career of one of the most paradoxical artists pop culture has yet produced.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Many years in the making, Freida Lee Mock's documentary Wrestling With Angels paints an intimate and detailed portrait of playwright Tony Kushner, in the years since he became the most important living American dramatist. It's hard to avoid the conclusion that this is something of a booby prize.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Offers an introduction to the lean-and-mean, social-realist Romanian storytelling style that's built around a charismatic young actor and a familiar genre.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A discombobulated summer movie that’s kind of fun but doesn’t have nearly enough story to fill up two hours.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a deeply flawed film but also an important one.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Murray, as always, supplies any number of small, memorable moments — he ultimately relies on the same defanged sentimentality.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the strangest and least summarizable motion pictures ever made: tragic and hilarious, tightly constructed and miscellaneous.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's kind of a mess. An agreeable, even lovable mess, but still a mess.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A distinctively absorbing entertainment, offering just enough popcorn thrills for mass audiences and just enough chewiness for hardcore sci-fi fans.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a mixed bag with plenty of gags that fall flat, not a comic masterpiece. But it's got tremendous zing, a sense of mischief and a big heart, more than enough to mark it as a delicious shot of caffeinated ice cream, and the summer season's funniest comedy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Outsiders will find this schtick-laden, mildly exciting adventure yarn an inoffensive triviality, while fans will savor one more encounter with Picard, Riker, Data, Worf and the gang, replete with all the well-worn character tics and platitudinous parables about the contemporary world they expect.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Profane, hilarious and ultimately heartbreaking, Alex Holdridge's black-and-white feature In Search of a Midnight Kiss has a gutter purity that makes you root for it all the way and forgive its patches of ultra-indie awkwardness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lymelife offers charm and humor through its young central characters and pathos through its remarkable supporting cast, without pulling punches on its overall atmosphere of autumnal darkness and anomie.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    But the greatness of Chinatown, unappreciated by my adolescent self, lies not in its cynical view of the California dream (that's too easy) but in its fatalistic, even tragic conception of America and indeed of human nature.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    This might have worked if the director and lead actress had the kind of intense mutual understanding that, say, Ingmar Bergman had with Liv Ullmann, or John Cassavetes had with Gena Rowlands.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    However you slice it, Monsters is a dynamite little film, loaded with atmosphere, intelligence, beauty and courage.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This bloody celebration finally gives the American Revolution the epic it deserves.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's rare enough to see a Hollywood movie made with this much attention and personality, let alone one that balances comedy and darkness as well as this one does.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite all that South American sunshine, this lean and brilliantly constructed thriller is a dark realm of secrets and lies, illuminated by TV lighting and the glitter of John Leguizamo's eyes. Those in search of life-affirming family entertainment might want to stick with Ingmar Bergman.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The film's strange blend of tragedy and surreal gore, à la Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci, is surprisingly effective. For the right person, and you know who you are, this one's a must-see.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Does this crazy idea work? Maybe 70 percent of the time, but when it does it's both daring and brilliant.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    On the whole, Friends With Benefits is a rewarding summer diversion, albeit one that's fatally torn between what it wants to be -- riotous, anarchic and anti-moralistic -- and the disappointing wet-blanket formula it reverts to in the end.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Much of the picture is exciting and terrifying.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    So some good acting and decent scares get entombed within too many dull postmodern iterations.

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