Andrew O'Hehir
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For 1,407 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol
Lowest review score: 0 The Replacements
Score distribution:
1,407 movie reviews
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An agreeably chewy, pulpy work of old-fashioned crime cinema, a fair bit overcooked and overlong, but worth catching for its acting, its atmosphere and its action set-pieces.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Haneke's new Funny Games has a current of bleak humor that comes through more clearly when you're not reading subtitles. It remains a horrifying, implacable mind-fuck, liable to be widely misunderstood and widely despised.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Many years in the making, Freida Lee Mock's documentary Wrestling With Angels paints an intimate and detailed portrait of playwright Tony Kushner, in the years since he became the most important living American dramatist. It's hard to avoid the conclusion that this is something of a booby prize.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Disney World, in this incoherent but often amazing work of American psychodrama, has a lot in common with the Overlook Hotel of “The Shining,” the Venice of “Death in Venice” and the booze-soaked Cuernavaca of “Under the Volcano.” It’s a zone of existential dread, the place where masculine dreams go to die, the place where the unburied ghosts of civilization rise up like Mouse-eared, three-fingered zombies and bite us in the ass.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An engrossing, gem-hard little popcorn-cruncher.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An alternately charming and frustrating comic entertainment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Christensen's conventional plot is somewhat at odds with her downbeat realism, the idea that these characters are willing to fight like cats and dogs, and destroy each other and themselves, to avoid confronting their intense attraction to each other is totally convincing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a tepidly amusing film that will offend no one, including those it claims to skewer.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's nothing unconventional or daring about On_Line, but considering how cheap it undoubtedly was to make, the acting, writing and direction all stand up pretty well; this is more intelligent and better structured than at least half the Hollywood movies I see.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Après Vous offers nice sound design and an unfussy presentation of middle-class Paris. It comes and goes with no unpleasant aftertaste.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Jurassic World unquestionably “delivers.” It feels like a hit; it offers a professionally crafted blend of blandness, predictability, watered-down cultural commentary and manufactured excitement.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A lovely, faintly sinister travelogue.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lee Harvey Oswald's guilt or innocence or accomplices are not the point of the film; Stone is more interested in the fact that much about the Kennedy murder is now so shrouded in myth and mystification as to be permanently unknowable, and that that fact alone has gnawed away at the self-confidence of middle-class white America ever since.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The kind of little indie you'll either hate or find impossible to resist. I fall into the latter camp, but can appreciate opposing views.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I think the movie is so restrained, and holds back so much on conventional plot and characterization, that its emotional impact is severely blunted. Nolte is excellent, I suppose, but we've seen this damaged-American-dude shtick from him before.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's essentially a mishmash of random ingredients, not very systematically presented and skewed to flatter its audience's presumed enlightenment.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The pleasant surprise when you actually watch Insidious is that it turns out to be a moderately effective suburban-family creep show, majorly in debt to "Poltergeist" and "The Exorcist" and capturing at least a little of their spirit.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It has, at times, a loopy, edgy humor and moments of genuinely affecting pathos. But somehow the combination doesn't add up to anything.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It may be a haphazard mess, but it's actually pretty funny.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This third-act redemption raises Towelhead several notches, but it still ends up feeling like a well-acted and well-intentioned after-school special, a long way from the vividness and texture of Ball's television work.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A bit pedantic, but thorough and interesting throughout, a must for history buffs.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed it immensely, flat-footed dialogue and implausible situations and all. Which doesn't stop me from believing that in its totality Secretariat is a work of creepy, half-hilarious master-race propaganda almost worthy of Leni Riefenstahl, and all the more effective because it presents as a family-friendly yarn about a nice lady and her horse.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Offers an intriguing, and profoundly frustrating, view of the New York underground hero whose 1962 erotic fantasy "Flaming Creatures" paved the way for Andy Warhol, John Waters, the "queer cinema" explosion and pretty much anybody who's ever made a movie starring his friends in weird Salvation Army outfits.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is going to be a notorious film that young audiences will be daring themselves to see, but it's actually funnier, darker and more troubling before it turns into a carnival of repeated dismemberment.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The second movie by "Being John Malkovich" writer Charlie Kaufman is even weirder than his first.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's an ambitious, uneven, surprisingly talky melodrama.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Wild the movie has a curiously unsticky and unmemorable quality, as if it had melted along the journey, a Sierra Nevada snowball in the Mojave Desert. It has the same nearly invisible flaws as “Dallas Buyers Club,” Vallée’s last agreeable pop-anthropology fable of fall and redemption, but writ larger: It’s just that little bit prepackaged, it stands off from us a little too far. It wants us to feel, but not to feel anything dangerous.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Aided by witty and understated work from Baldwin and Stewart and the capable direction of Glatzer and Westmoreland, Moore does her utmost to pull Still Alice toward the realm of meaningful social drama. Let’s put it this way: It’s a way better movie than it ought to be, but not good enough to escape its pulpy, mendacious roots.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's literally difficult to believe that the person who made this picturesque, clueless, oddly misanthropic picture also made "Annie Hall" and "Crimes and Misdemeanors."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sometimes a story – a true story, a fictional one or a hybrid of the two – is sufficiently powerful and intriguing that it can break through the formula and packaging around it. Such is almost but not quite the case with The Theory of Everything.

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