Andrew O'Hehir
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For 1,326 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 12 Years a Slave
Lowest review score: 0 8MM
Score distribution:
1,326 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a movie of tremendous visual daring, magnificent special-effects work and surprising moral gravity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I hope viewers don’t come away from this essential documentary with the belief that Western AIDS activists in general turned their backs on poor black people just as soon as they got medicine that worked. That isn’t remotely fair. Blame for the African AIDS holocaust falls on the Big Pharma companies who put patents and profits ahead of human life, and on all of us who let them get away with it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I’m saying that King has fearlessly forged into unexplored territory — that being the African-American stoner comedy, with an adult audience in view – and the results are profoundly hilarious, occasionally heartbreaking, often brilliant and entirely devoid of political piety.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A work of immense mystery and strangeness, loaded with unforgettable images, spectacular sweeps of color and nested, hidden meanings. It feels to me like a meditative epic about Japan’s traumatic journey into modernity, and a complicated allegory about the innocence, arrogance and culpability of artists. It’s one of the most beautiful animated films ever made, and something close to a masterpiece.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    As a pure head-trip visual and auditory experience it feels like one of the biggest discoveries, and biggest surprises, of 2014.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is one of Anderson’s funniest and most fanciful movies, but perversely enough it may also be his most serious, most tragic and most shadowed by history, with the frothy Ernst Lubitsch-style comedy shot through with an overwhelming sense of loss.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This gripping and grotesque portrait of retail politics in the Hawkeye State, entirely free of editorial commentary, locates truths about the contemporary Republican Party and our flawed electoral system that a more tendentious account never could.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I found this dark odyssey through an amoral dream Brooklyn curiously invigorating; it’s a masterful construction that held me rapt from first shot to last, that builds intense electrical energy and then releases it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Alfred Hitchcock had grown up as a Palestinian, he might have made something like Hany Abu-Assad’s Oscar-nominated Omar, which is a tender love story, a haunting tragedy and an expertly crafted thriller with flawed, damaged and not entirely likable characters.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    McDonagh walks a hazardous tightrope from scene to scene, from amiable comedy to black-hearted farce to heartbreaking tragedy, often trying to strike all those notes within seconds. It doesn’t all work equally well, but the cumulative effect is powerful.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    For the most part, 20,000 Days on Earth – the approximate amount of time Cave has been alive on this planet – is an imagistic and impressionistic work, a Nick Cave-esque tone poem driven by moments of visual and thematic juxtaposition you either have to reject or accept.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ida
    What makes Ida remarkable is how much Pawlikowski is able to accomplish in just 80 minutes, with a pair of mismatched female characters, a handful of wintry and desolate locations, the square-format cinematography of Ryszard Lenczewski and Lukasz Zal, and a soundtrack that combines modernism, Soviet-bloc pop music and a haunting performance of John Coltrane’s “Naima” that seems to capture all the emotional possibilities the characters cannot express.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Horses of God is one of the most forceful entries in a growing body of cinema that interrogates the causes and effects of terrorism, nationalism and fundamentalism in the Arab world.