For 1,318 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 All Is Lost
Lowest review score: 0 Let's Be Cops
Score distribution:
1,318 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Writer-director Derek Cianfrance, who with Blue Valentine makes an astonishing debut.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Another Year allows viewers to occupy both psychic spaces, nesting into the warm comforts of a long-lived-in home and then, on a dime, seeing it through the searching eyes of the marginalized figures that, over the course of 11 films, Leigh has so often championed.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The weakest link in Unknown - okay, other than the utter preposterousness of its entire premise - is Jones, who as a modern-day version of Hitch's ice queens can't hold her own with the likes of Kim Novak, Grace Kelly and Eva Marie Saint.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Depp possesses one of the finest speaking voices in the business - a nimble, mellifluous instrument that can go from sexy growl to fey warble in no seconds flat.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A pleasantly seedy crime thriller.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A taut, mostly well-crafted race against the clock that combines the time-loop conceit of "Groundhog Day" and the postwar paranoia of "The Manchurian Candidate."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    This meditation on violence explores the toxic knock-on effect of powerlessness and overcompensation, delivering a potent essay on the roots of society's most primal evils.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Rio
    This is a movie that imbues even the hoariest quest-peril-life lesson tropes of family animated films and imbues them with new life and rhythm.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Wiig has the natural beauty and self-deprecating expressiveness it takes to be a star comedienne; she spends much of Bridesmaids looking like a slightly girlier version of Lucinda Williams.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    On Stranger Tides feels as fresh and bracingly exhilarating as the day Jack Sparrow first swashed his buckle.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Sheer pleasure to watch, full of rich visuals and felicitous comic turns.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    First Class happily delivers on the escapism and rich narrative texture the best of its predecessors have promised.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With its heartening final note of hope and renewal, Deathly Hallows -- Part 2 provides an altogether fitting finale to a series that has prized the fans above all.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Tender, observant coming-of-age comedy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Captain America might hold the most promise, not just of saving the world, but of saving comic book movies from themselves.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With such classics as "El Norte" and, more recently, "Sin Nombre" and "Under the Same Moon" having addressed the subject matter already and so well, viewers might be forgiven for asking just how many immigration movies we need. As A Better Life proves, as many as there are stories to tell.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    An absorbing, agonizing documentary about ambition, lust and anthropomorphism at their most heedless, records suffering and manipulation so extreme that description can barely do them justice.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    What does The Future hold? Wonders, each of them weirder and more unnerving than the last.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Funny, moving, hip and transcendent all at the same time, The Way is both deeply thoughtful and enormous fun to watch.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Elizabeth Olsen delivers an utterly transfixing turn as the title character of this chilling psychological thriller.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    After all, Like Crazy seems to say, haven't we all been there? Didn't it hurt? And wasn't it grand?
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    As von Trier's ultimate wish-fulfillment fantasy, Melancholia is a broodingly downbeat self-portrait but also the inspiring work of an artist of seemingly boundless imaginative power.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Strangely, Scorsese's very passion for the subject matter turns out to be both a blessing and a curse for Hugo.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Fans of Fassbender's yummy performances in this year's "Jane Eyre" and "X-Men: First Class" should be forewarned that, although we see the handsome Irish actor in the altogether, Shame is strangely un-sexy.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    As a stylistic and narrative throwback, Alfredson's adamantly un-thrilling procedural reminds viewers of an era when viewers allowed themselves to be entertained by a good yarn about a few colorful or at least colorlessly compelling characters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Mortensen has called A Dangerous Method Cronenberg's "Merchant-Ivory picture," but it just as often resembles a Woody Allen movie - literate, sophisticated and deeply concerned with sex and manners. (It's even mordantly funny, as an early scene at the Freud family dinner table attests.)
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Provides a welcome seasonal dash of wholesomeness and humor.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Spielberg has created an appropriate showcase for the magnificent creature that emerges, one that recalls the great movie horses of yore in a story guaranteed to pluck, grab and wring viewers' hearts, but thankfully not break them.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    One of the reasons Haywire is such a pleasure to watch is that its director, Steven Soderbergh, doesn't overplay the film's hear-me-roar subversions.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The setting and fatalistic musings of The Grey invite comparison to Sean Penn's stirring 2007 ad­ven­ture "Into the Wild"; in its more metaphysical moments, told in impressionistic flashbacks, it recalls last year's "The Tree of Life."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like the man himself, Albert Nobbs is a sweet, sad, sensitive little film, a haunting reminder that each of us, on some level, is impersonating someone.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Most vividly, The Swell Season captures the insistent, borderline-disturbing energy of fandom at its most rabid and psychically intrusive.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Lynne Ramsay's thoughtful, unnerving film works its strange power over viewers who are likely to find themselves as compelled as repelled by its fatally flawed key players.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like Marilyn Monroe and Judy Holliday before him, Tatum is sublime at playing dumb (as a dim pretty boy, he seems to be channeling Brad Pitt in "Burn After Reading"), just as Hill shrewdly deploys his body mass for maximum physical comedy (even slimmed down, with an Oscar nomination under that tightened belt, he carries himself with a fat man's comically elephantine grace).
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A pulpy, deceivingly insightful send-up of horror movies that elicits just as many knowing chuckles as horrified gasps.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The Avengers has been executed with all the reverence the super-fans demand, as well as the winking, self-referential humor that has made it palatable for filmgoers disinclined to take a bunch of grown men dressed in spangles and spandex so very seriously.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    As a lucid, emotionally involving portrait of the looming crisis surrounding water - supplies of which are dwindling as contamination rises - Jessica Yu's smartly constructed argument works less as a tutorial than as an infectiously impassioned call to arms.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Interspersing "real" people with professional actors, Linklater creates a vivid, gossipy Greek chorus that serves as a kind of collective unreliable narrator -- an altogether appropriate stance given the moral gray zone the sweetly confounding Bernie inhabits.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Moonrise Kingdom is already shaping up to be this summer's art house sleeper hit, and no wonder: It traffics in the very kind of escapist spectacle -- in this case of a thoughtfully composed world brimming with whimsy, enchantment and visual brio -- that the season was made for.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Very little is simple in Your Sister's Sister -- not the emotions, the naturalistic tone or the unstudied, easygoing performances. But the film's pleasures are.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Dick, whose films include a revealing expose about the movie industry's film ratings board, has created yet another galvanizing call to action with The Invisible War.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    It's a nicely balanced blend of comedy, drama and athletic dancing that plies its trade with winking, unforced self-assurance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Hope Springs is a minor miracle of a movie. Within a Hollywood tradition accustomed to treating sex as something titillating, taboo, gauzily idealized or downright pornographic, finally someone has made a movie that treats it in the riskiest way possible: as the physical expression of intimacy between two flawed but recognizable adults.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With The Bourne Legacy, Gilroy has brought characteristic taste and skill to a nearly impossible task: embracing the past without completely erasing it, thereby creating an invitingly complicated and open-ended future.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Oslo, August 31st builds to an unforgettable climax, a bravura sequence that starts at a party, crawls through a variety of nightclubs and raves, and ends on a note of utterly surprising lyricism.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With warmth, unsparing self-awareness and that ineffable Everyman appeal sometimes called "relatability," Birbiglia proves to be as engaging a presence on the screen as he has been all these years onstage and over the radio waves.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    There are few cinematic pleasures as satisfying to behold as an actor in a role that fits him like a Savile Row suit. Richard Gere offers just such gratification in Arbitrage, a silky, sophisticated Wall Street thriller that finds the actor utterly in his prime, wearing his age and accumulated emotional wisdom with warmth, charisma and nonstop appeal.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A whimsical, sad, diverting and altogether delightful exploration of how cinema can benefit, not only from glancing back at its own past, but by staying open to parallel forms of presentation and play.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    That Detropia won't be just another well-reported urban obituary is clear from the film's arresting opening moments.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Beauty Is Embarrassing stays true to White's own exacting standards: It's thoughtful, skillfully executed and pure pop pleasure, from start to finish.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Just in time for the holiday travel season, Flight brings audiences perhaps the most harrowing scenes of a troubled airplane ever committed to film.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    From the first smoky notes of a theme song sung by Adele, it's clear that Skyfall will be both classic and of-the-moment.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    But even appreciated simply as a little-known chapter of European history, it proves consistently engrossing, edifying and affecting.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Life of Pi is spellbinding while it lasts. Lee's film can be appreciated as many things -- a post-Darwinian meditation on coexistence as the key to survival, a reflection on the spiritual nature of suffering and transcendence, a beguiling bait-and-switch on the vagaries of belief itself.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In the vein of such recent classics as "The Lives of Others" and "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days," Christian Petzold's Barbara re-visits the quiet, everyday tragedies of the Iron Curtain era, when paranoia ran deep and for very good reasons.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    West of Memphis makes a lucid, absorbing contribution to an epic saga that Berlinger and Sinofsky first wrestled into an 18-year-long narrative that changed two lives and saved one. And it gives that epic an ending that's happy, sad, inspiring, infuriating, right and terribly wrong, all at the same time.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Smoothly navigating the perilous line between insufferably twee and heartbreakingly grim, Quartet is a subtle, sure-footed delight.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    No
    No isn’t nearly as definitive or declarative as its title: It leaves viewers wondering whether they should cheer, shrug or shake their heads.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The filmmaker’s dedication to non-judgment occasionally militates against narrative drive: Beyond the Hills begins to sag in its middle sequences, when the repetitive monotony of Alina’s outbursts begins to yield diminishing returns. But he has made a film that’s worth even those wearying sequence.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Suffused with enormous compassion for the young woman at its center, this parable of awakenings shares some DNA with the art house hit “An Education” but has little of that movie’s nods to cozy humor and happy endings.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    42
    Harrison plays Rickey with a jutting jaw, squinting eye and hoarse bark straight out of the Irascible Old Coot playbook, his character constantly invoking God and the almighty dollar to justify what became known as Rickey’s “noble experiment.”
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The casting coup here is Benedict Cumberbatch, who exudes steely resolve and silken savagery as a villain on the cusp of becoming a legendary nemesis.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Primarily, What Maisie Knew is a showcase for consistently superb performances that, while utterly grounded in their characters, succeed in keeping viewers off-balance as to who will do what, and when.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like a seductively lambent hall of mirrors, The Bling Ring lays bare the venality of train-wreck celebrity culture, striving and self-deception by dramatizing a fact that’s as delicious as it is depressing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With Much Ado About Nothing, Whedon has crafted an endearing bagatelle, made with equal parts brio and love, ambition and pared-down modesty.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen delivers an astonishingly restrained and expressive central performance in The Hunt, an engrossing psycho-social drama by Thomas Vinterberg.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Blue Jasmine may not be a comeback in any aesthetic or professional sense, but it nevertheless feels like Allen has come back: to the psychic space and collective anxieties of the country of his birth and a real world that, for a while there, he seemed to have left behind.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In a World . . . is a lot of fun, reflecting Bell’s own obvious love of piquant paradox and the music of the spoken word. But it also has a sharply observant streak that makes it as nourishing as it is endearingly nutty.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Short Term 12 is that rare movie gutsy enough to tell the truth about love: that it’s not a poetic longing or a magical-thinking happy ending, but a skill. And, the film suggests, we all have the capacity to learn it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Howard directs Rush with speed and jangly, jarring verve, bringing the races themselves to white-knuckled life and allowing the men’s stories to play out with only slightly predictable reversals, upsets and, inevitably, those hard lessons learned.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    After Tiller does viewers the great service of providing light where there’s usually only heat, giving a human face and heart to what previously might have been an abstract issue or quickly scanned news item.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A well-acted, beautifully filmed, utterly depressing chronicle of revenge and thwarted dreams in post-industrial America.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Saving Mr. Banks doesn’t always straddle its stories and time periods with the utmost grace. But the film — which John Lee Hancock directed from a script by Kelly Marcel and Sue Smith — more than makes up for its occasionally unwieldy structure in telling a fascinating and ultimately deeply affecting story.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The Invisible Woman is less a conventional love story than a wise, often troubling contemplation of myriad modern impulses, from the lure of celebrity and public acclaim to the compartmentalizing of identity and the gender politics of Great Man-ism.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Of Miyazaki’s many gifts as a filmmaker, perhaps the most subtle is the way he honors time and silence and stillness, values that are in lamentably short supply in most modern-day productions.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A bracing, quietly exhilarating documentary.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A compulsively arranged sacher torte of a movie, an elegant mousetrap of stories-within-stories that invokes history with a temperament ranging from winsome to deeply mournful.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The wittiest jokes and cameo appearances are designed to soar far over the heads of young filmgoers and into the atavistic pop consciousness of their adult companions.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Viewers may not agree about what they’ve seen when they come out of Noah. But there’s no doubt that Aronofsky has made an ambitious, serious, even visionary motion picture, whose super-sized popcorn-movie vernacular may occasionally submerge the story’s more reflective implications, but never drowns them entirely.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A baggy, at times brutal conglomeration of surprisingly deep character development and aggressively percussive action, The Winter Soldier is a comic-book movie only in its provenance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    What might have been just another anodyne promo piece or solipsistic valentine instead becomes a funny, eccentric and finally deeply poignant depiction of art, family, ­self-sabotage and the prickly intricacies of brotherly love.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Thanks to a sensitive performance from Kinnear, as well as from a terrific cast of supporting actors, what could have been merely a feel-good exercise in Eschatology Lite instead becomes a wholesome but also surprisingly tough-minded portrait of a man wrestling with his faith.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Hateship Loveship sneaks up on the viewer, not only in the way the story takes its unlikely turns, but in Wiig’s own portrayal of a woman discovering desire and, in the most subtle way possible, acting on it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    One of the great strengths of Finding Vivian Maier is the filmmakers’ willingness to gently thread ethical inquiry in and out of the film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Through vivid archival material and voice-overs, the filmmakers create moving vignettes that, taken together, form a fascinating primer on nonviolence as a political force and discipline.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Million Dollar Arm doesn’t break the familiar mold of come-from-behind sports movies — indeed, it obeys every convention of the genre. But it does so with understatement, style and an exceptional group of actors who bring just the right balance of humor and restraint to their roles.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Ida
    Each and every detail accrues to create a vivid, unforgettable portrait, and all are absorbed and reflected by Anna, portrayed by Trzebuchowska with the transparency and wonder of a woman for whom not just history but secular life itself is almost totally abstract.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A wise, warm, funny and touching romantic drama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like summer movies themselves, it’s become so easy to be glib in dismissing Tom Cruise. “Edge of Tomorrow” provides welcome and hugely entertaining evidence that he’s still a star of considerable gifts, and savvy enough not to let them be squandered just yet.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    This is a sequel that wears its well-worn formula, mocking inside jokes and gleeful taste for overkill proudly, flying the high-lowbrow flag for audiences that like their comedy just smart enough to be not-too-dumb.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    You may not have agreed with Ebert’s reviews — you may not have thought he was such a nice guy. But if you aren’t moved by Life Itself, you ought to have your heart examined.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In its own way, the movie version — handsomely directed by Phillip Noyce and featuring an appealing, sure-footed cast of emerging and veteran actors — aptly reflects The Giver’s pride of place as the one that started it all, or at least the latest wave.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In the taut, emotionally gripping documentary Dinosaur 13, filmmaker Todd Douglas Miller meticulously re-creates seven eventful, tense and finally heartbreaking years.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Beneath those puppet-headed antics, and true to its title, Frank is improbably, disarmingly honest.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Attention is duly paid in this tender and touching film; the strangest thing about Love Is Strange is how completely un-strange it is, from its familiar family dynamics to its exquisite honesty and compassion.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In a bait-and-switch worthy of its title, The Good Lie may lure in viewers eager to see a Reese Witherspoon movie, but they’ll fall in love with something else entirely.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Even when it skates recklessly close to shopworn cliches, Pride manages to navigate around them with vigor, as well as disarming, even wholesome, open-heartedness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    It’s true that satire is the perfect weapon of reason, and Justin Simien deploys it with resourcefulness, cool assurance and eagle-eyed aim.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Exciting, absorbing and stubbornly optimistic in the face of overwhelming devastation, E-Team will, with any luck, shed deserved light on the routine sacrifices these activists and professionals make for the sake of human values.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The film has a sulfuric, Dostoyevskian quality — and sick sense of humor — that captures the muted aquarium that Los Angeles becomes at night, a spell that’s broken once plot overtakes mood.

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