For 571 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Anthony Lane's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Host
Lowest review score: 0 The Da Vinci Code
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 46 out of 571
571 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Lucky Number Slevin is a bag of nerves. Everything here is too much. The older the actors, the saltier the ham of their performances.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Picture my disappointment as I realized that, for all the pizzazz of Superman Returns, its global weapon of choice would not be terrorism, or nuclear piracy, or dirty bombs. It would be real estate. What does Warner Bros. have in mind for the next installment? Superman overhauls corporate pension plans? Luthor screws Medicare?
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    This, to put it mildly, is new terrain for Macy, and his journey--from Arthur Miller, as it were, to Céline and Dostoyevsky--does not always convince.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    In the end, the problem with Conversations with Other Women is not that it pulls an ordinary romance into unfamiliar shapes but that it doesn't pull far enough. It may be dotted with fine observations, yet somehow the charm of its novelty grows stale, and the airless feeling of a closed set begins to fester.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    A frantic and funny diversion, but it pales and tires before its time is up. It doesn't know the meaning of enough.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The movie may have significant truths to impart, although I have my doubts, but it feels too inexperienced, too unworldly, to have earned the right to them.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    How, then, does The Good German--adapted by Paul Attanasio from Joseph Kanon's novel--wind up so insubstantial, its impact lasting no longer than a cigarette?
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    A slight and rueful affair, intermittently funny.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The film is nonsense, and what counts is whether viewers will feel able to lay aside their logical complaints and bask in what remains: a trip in search of a tan.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    It is no mean feat to make a boring film about Jesse James, but Andrew Dominik has pulled it off in style.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Gray would have been happiest, I guess, to make movies in the nineteen-seventies, and this one feels much closer to 1975 than to 1988; he could certainly use a seventies audience to watch his movies now--one that could be trusted not to grumble about his slow, unexcitable fades.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    As daft, outlandish, and speedy as it needs to be, and, for all its newfangled effects, touchingly old-fashioned in its reverence for the Jules Verne novel that inspired it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The over-all effect is bizarre, daring you to be amused by something both brilliant and bristling with offense; if you sidle out at the end, feeling half guilty at what you just conspired in, then Stiller has trapped you precisely where he wants you.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    In Holdridge's movie there is as much to repel as there is to allure, and I cannot imagine leaving a screening of it in anything less than two minds.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    It's a shame, then, that the later stages of Lakeview Terrace should overheat and spill into silliness. The plot is compromised, not resolved, by the pulling of a gun.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    This film's got EVERYTHING, although purists might quibble that it lacks any sliver of plausibility or dramatic interest.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    A minor work, but so menaced by distress that the characters take every opportunity to dance the dark away.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    There has long been a strain of sorry lassitude in Kaufman's work, and here it sickens into the morbid.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Che
    It would be comforting, and tidy, to suggest that the director had waited all his life for the chance to make this film, as if it meant everything to him; yet I still have no idea what truly quickens his heart, and at some level, for all the movie’s narrative momentum, Che retains the air of a study exercise--of an interest brilliantly explored. How else to explain one's total flatness of feeling at the climax of each movie?
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    What makes Valkyrie more depressing than exciting is that it forces you to ask, against your judgment, what, exactly, he achieved.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The only person who wakes the movie from its slumbers is Emily Blunt. She gets a nothing role as a publicist, and makes something both sultry and casual out of it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    As I took off my gray-lensed 3-D spectacles at the end of Monsters vs. Aliens, I felt not so much immersed as fuzzy with exhaustion. What I had seen struck me less as a herald of shining possibility than as a thrill ride back to the future--back, that is, to an idea of the future, and a stale one at that.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    As it is, the movie's lethal climax, with its vague protest against corporate control--and hence in favor of art, music, drugs, or whatever--feels like a poor theft from a more conventional film.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    You can’t deny the smiling mood that wafts through the film like incense, and to that extent it honors the original three days; but not once does a character’s show of feeling stir you, send you, or stop you in your tracks, and the loss is unsustainable.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    By the end of the film, you just want to get away from these people.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Too much of the film feels like one of Balsan’s house parties: undriven, indulgent, quite at ease.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    It would be a shock if Antichrist had turned out to be anything but shocking.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    He can follow any train of thought, so he does, and it’s no surprise when the trains run out of steam.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Seems a touch too long, too airless, and too content with its own contrivances to stir the heart.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    One is forced to ask: who wants to make, or watch, a major Hollywood musical about mental block?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    From the start, it feels handsome, steady, and stuck; the ties that bind the historical bio-pic are no looser than those which constrain a royal personage, and the frustration to which Victoria would later admit is legible in the face of Emily Blunt, who takes the title role.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Cera can be winning enough, with his flat-toned goofiness, in films like "Superbad," but there's only just enough of the guy to fill out one dramatis persona; two at once prove to be beyond him. [11 Jan. 2010, p.83]
    • The New Yorker
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The narrative lacks a magnetic north; it encompasses so much, and the needle swings from Jeanne’s predicament to her mother’s dismay and to the support that comes from a celebrated Jewish lawyer, played by the ever-compelling Michel Blanc.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The standard defense of such material is that we are watching “cartoon violence,” but, when filmmakers nudge a child into viewing savagery as slapstick, are we not allowing them to do what we condemn in the pornographer--that is, to coarsen and inflame?
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    As a study in prankhood, this Banksy film can’t touch “F for Fake,” Orson Welles’s 1974 movie about an art forger. Welles both conspired with his untrustworthy subject and held him at arm’s length, like a conjurer with his rabbit, and you came out dazzled by the sleight, whereas Exit Through the Gift Shop feels dangerously close to the promotion of a cult--almost, dare one say it, of a brand.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The makers of “Wonder Boys,” Douglas’s finest hour, did more to maintain their distance, and their patience, and Solitary Man feels a touch small and sour by comparison. That said, its litany of character studies is more engaging than most of what you will see this summer.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    I know that we are meant to be drawn into the undergrowth of these ordinary lives, and the long tale is neatly split into four symbolic seasons;...But do they and their fellow-Brits honestly swell the heart, or do they grate, exasperate, and finally grind us down?
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    A lot more fun than bludgeoning, soul-draining follies like "Terminator Salvation" or the "Transformers" films, and, with a decisive trim, it could truly have fulfilled its brief as a bright, semi-abstract pop fantasy, at once excitable and disposable. Oddly, it did once exist in that form: in the first trailer.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The trouble with Super, as with "Kick-Ass," is that the director wants to have his cake, put a pump-action shotgun up against the frosting, blast vanilla sponge over a wide area, and THEN eat it. [4 April, 2011, p. 83]
    • The New Yorker
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    In The Conspirator, one wishes that the director had found the grace to touch upon, rather than belabor, the parallels between the conspirators of 1865 and the present-day inmates of Guantánamo.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The year's most divided movie to date; everything that happens in the higher realms, vaguely derived from Nordic legend, is posturing nonsense, whereas the scenes down here are managed, for the most part, with dexterity and wit. [16 May 2011, p. 133]
    • The New Yorker
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    That is what kids will come away with, together with a dose of wishful thinking: the vague belief that, with good will and a foe from far away, all those feuding parties of the Wild West - the cowboys, the Indians, and the no-good rogues - could have settled their differences and got along just fine. Go tell it to Gary Cooper.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    As with Spielberg's "Munich," there is an awkward, irresoluble tension between the movie's urge to thrill and the weighty pull of the historical obligations that it seeks to assume. How much, to be blunt, should we be enjoying ourselves? What do we owe to The Debt? Whatever the sum, it is more than the film itself, gloomy with unease, seems able to repay.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Having delighted in the doominess of Drive, as its journey began, I ended much less joyful than repelled.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Clooney and company could have used Sturges - or, even better, Clifford Odets - when it came to rewrites. With all the betrayals and gassy ambitions swirling around here, we badly need dialogue to ignite the film, instead of which even the most aggressive spirits keep firing the dampest of lines.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Fassbender, who was, frankly, much sexier and more devilish in "X-Men: First Class," is required to spend much of his time staring with blank intensity into the middle distance.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The performances are lusty and concerted, but they remain just that - performances, of the sort that may make you feel you should stagger to your feet at the end and applaud. If so, resist.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The new film will recruit new friends to the cause; but if we seek George Smiley and his people, with their full complement of terrors, illusions, and shames, we should follow the example of the ever-retiring Smiley, and go back to our books. That's the truth.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The whole film, in fact, which Pitts wrote and directed, lurks on the borders of the unspecified. That is the source of its cool, but also of its sullen capacity to annoy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Some sign of mental reach would have been welcome, even if it extended only as far as their children. Indeed, given the title, it's remarkable how little space is granted to the offspring, who are introduced as excretory machines, sex-blocking irritants, and occasional simpering angels, but never as beings unto themselves. Any parents who see this movie should be warned about the final score: Friends 6, Kids 0.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Spurlock's documentary will tell you how, and whether, you should join the pilgrimage. Because I have never watched "Battlestar Galactica," and because of my absurd reluctance to dress up as Wonder Woman, I wouldn't last five minutes. [23 April 2012, p. 82]
    • The New Yorker
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Why, as a patron of Rock of Ages, do I wish I had taken the precaution of entering the theater drunk? [25 June 2012, p.84]
    • The New Yorker
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    So rich is that visual yield, however, that it needs no verbal boost. Yet, from the moment that Margot says to Daniel, while sitting next to him on a plane, "I'm afraid of connections," the dialogue strains and grunts so hard for effect that it threatens to pull a muscle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Even if you like your movies sick and black, as many people do, it's hard to miss the irony: in the very act of trying to intensify his Southern tale, Friedkin dilutes the impact.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Anyone who soldiered through "The Expendables," two years ago, will be touched, and a little surprised, to learn that there is more to expend. [3 Sept. 2012, p.79]
    • The New Yorker
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    It's a relief to see Sacha Baron Cohen, in the role of a seamy innkeeper, bid goodbye to Cosette with the wistful words "Farewell, Courgette." One burst of farce, however, is not enough to redress the basic, inflationary bombast that defines Les Misérables. Fans of the original production, no doubt, will eat the movie up, and good luck to them. I screamed a scream as time went by.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    By the time Tarantino shows up as a redneck with an unexplained Australian accent, Django Unchained has mislaid its melancholy, and its bitter wit, and become a raucous romp. It is a tribute to the spaghetti Western, cooked al dente, then cooked a while more, and finally sauced to death.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    If only Kim had a sense of humor to match his visual wit. Instead, we get rusted gags and rubbery acting.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Boyle is genial, eager, and prolific, and his effusion has ignited films like "Trainspotting" and "Slumdog Millionaire," yet for every blaze that excites us there has been another that burns itself out without leaving a mark, let alone a scar, on our emotions. So it is with Trance. [8 April 2013, p.88]
    • The New Yorker
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Yet Oblivion is worth the trip. There are two reasons for this. The first is the cinematography of Claudio Miranda.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Compare this film with "Mud," and you realize how desperately you cared about the fate of the boys in "Mud," whereas those in Vogt-Roberts's movie are often too listless and too plaintive to earn, let alone heighten, our anxiety. [3 June 2013, p.74]
    • The New Yorker
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    It is possible to applaud Pacific Rim for the efficacy of its business model while deploring the tale that has been engendered — long, loud, dark, and very wet. You might as well watch the birth of an elephant.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    And that's it, really: two hours of loneliness, interleaved with havoc. The dialogue has been distilled to expletives and grunts. [16 Sept. 2013, p.74]
    • The New Yorker
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Thanks for Sharing is worth it, because of Pink. [30 Sept. 2013, p.85]
    • The New Yorker
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The result may be the oddest film of the season. It boasts an array of sublime backdrops and a yearning score, but the climate of feeling is anxious and inward, encapsulated in Stiller’s darting gaze, and the movie itself keeps glancing backward, at the lost and the obsolete.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Skip Godzilla the movie. Watch the trailer.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The Last of Robin Hood, written and directed by Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland, is often pallid and thin.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The glum fact is that Gone Girl lacks clout where it needs it most, at its core.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    You should see it just for Chester — the adventurous sham, running ever deeper into a maze of his own devising.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Enigma is, to be blunt, "No way Out" meets "Revenge of the Nerds," and the meetinhg is not a happy one. [22 & 29 April 2002, p. 208]
    • The New Yorker
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Sadly, the men here come across as whiny and infantile, and Green is dangerously keen to stress their retardation. [17 & 24 2003, p.204]
    • The New Yorker
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    It may have the melody, visage and basics of a Bollywood biggie, but truth be told, The Guru, despite it’s zest and lure, gives the far-off genus a bad wrap. [3 February 2003, p.98]
    • The New Yorker
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Illogical and glum. [30 Sept 2002, p. 145]
    • The New Yorker
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    We are led through a murky and, it must be said, wholly uninvolving saga of substance abuse and related multiple murders. [6 October 2003, p. 138]
    • The New Yorker
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    You have to feel sorry for Moore, who is called upon to supply an unappealing mixture of neurosis and starch, and whose instinctive frailty is so endlessly exploited by Howitt's movie that the jokes, such as they are, go into retreat. [3 May 2004, p. 110]
    • The New Yorker
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    The horror flick, at its height, was a lyrical caressing of our fears; by the end of this nonsense, you fear for the well-being of the genre. “It’s dead!” [24 May 2004, p. 96]
    • The New Yorker
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Even by the standards of disaster movies, The Day After Tomorrow is irretrievably poor: a shambles of dud writing and dramatic inconsequence which left me determined to double my consumption of fossil fuels. [7 June 2004, p. 102]
    • The New Yorker
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    A thriller stripped of thrills--or, even worse, a thriller that thinks of itself as somehow rising above the vulgar pleasures of excitement.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    You have to applaud for sheer folly. This doesn't just reprise another film. It reprises a French film.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    The directors, Andrew Lau and Alan Mak, manage to convince us that we have witnessed an action movie, although in fact the quantity of violence is so minimal that, under Hong Kong law, Infernal Affairs barely qualifies as a motion picture.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    The happy couple (Farrell/Dawson) do enjoy one great scene together, and it's the high point of the movie-a naked tussle, in which she puts a knife to his throat. The whole sequence is quick, funny, and arousing, in sharp contrast to the rest of Alexander, which is sluggish, unsmiling.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    A perplexing compound of the silly and the glum.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Yes
    You may get off on this enthralling stuff, But after half an hour I'd had enough.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    There are moments when music and lyrics bear only the faintest relation to each other, a tricky state of affairs in a work that is almost bereft of spoken dialogue.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    More like the Pelican Long-and-Drawn-Out: well over two hours of plots, subplots and super-subdialogue.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    In truth, von Trier is not so much a filmmaker as a misanthropic mesmerist, who uses movies to bend the viewer to his humorless will.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    The best reason to stay with it is Vaughn, whose lanky wryness wards off the threat of pomposity. The worst reason is Jada Pinkett Smith, who gets stuck with a thankless role as the unwittingly lethal villain -- a newspaper journalist, of course.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    As for the overriding reason to see the film, that's easy. Lighten Zahedi's complexion, stuff him in a fright wig, and this fellow would be a ringer for Harpo Marx.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    The plot would seem more ingenious if the movie itself didn't copy so many other thrillers (notably "The Silence of the Lambs"), and if it weren't so easy to spot every twist half an hour in advance.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    This awkward and half-digested movie gives off a melancholy reek.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    That's the problem with this third installment of the franchise: not that it's running out of ideas, or lifting them too slavishly from the original comic, but that it lunges at them with an infantile lack of grace, throwing money at one special effect after another and praying--or calculating--that some of them will fly.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    What happens, though, and what lures the film into disaster, is that Hartley lets slip his sense of humor (always his strongest asset) and begins to believe his own plot.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    "Gentlemen, I wash my hands of this weirdness," Captain Jack says. Sir, you speak for us all.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Anyone hoping that 2 Days in Paris will revisit such peppy romance (“Annie Hall”), however, will be frustrated. There is an extra rawness here, a determination to confront and annoy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    It winces with liberal self-chastisement: Redford is surely smart enough to realize, as the professor turns his ire on those who merely chatter while Rome burns, that his movie is itself no better, or more morally effective, than high-concept Hollywood fiddling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    It makes “Yellow Submarine” look like a miracle of sober narrative.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    No one wants a movie that tiptoes in step with political correctness, yet the willful opposite can be equally noxious, and, as In Bruges barges and blusters its way through dwarf jokes, child-abuse jokes, jokes about fat black women, and moldy old jokes about Americans, it runs the risk of pleasing itself more than its paying viewers.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    A comedy without one foot on the ground is no more than a flight of fancy, as directionless as a balloon; the master clowns of silent cinema knew that, and so does Mr. Fletcher, the gravid elder statesman of this film. As he says to Mike and Jerry, “I appreciate your creativity, but let’s be realistic for a second.” Be kind. Erase.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    A confused, humorless grind.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Parts of Bangkok Dangerous, far from seeming unfamiliar or freshly stylized, offer nothing that you couldn't catch in an episode of "CSI."

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