For 65 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 72% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Bill Weber's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Le Rayon Vert (1986)
Lowest review score: 25 Night Train to Lisbon
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 35 out of 65
  2. Negative: 18 out of 65
65 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Weber
    Underlying the occasionally harrowing, consistently mournful tone is a philosophy that, more than being explicitly anti-capital punishment, puts both family ties and the social contract at the center of people's self-worth.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    The beloved gang's sweet reunion will melt nostalgic adults into laughter and tears, and maybe kids won't mind drippy new Muppet Walter so much.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Fast on its feet, using 3D and motion-capture animation to kick its comedy-adventure into a superhuman gear, Steven Spielberg's The Adventures of Tintin is a wittily kineticized adaptation of the internationally loved comic books.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Its director's romantic sensibilities wed to Terrence Rattigan's 60-year-old play, this period drama is buoyed by Rachel Weisz's poignant embodiment of a bourgeois wife seeking erotic autonomy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Confronting the concept of alienness in a California desert town, this modest tapestry finds equivalent dignity in history-conscious travelers and natives weighed down by roots or inertia.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    It's not easy to give a character study concerning mental illness the aspect of a psychological thriller without some notes of exploitation or trivialization creeping in, and Take Shelter makes a few missteps.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Simply and devastatingly letting five residents of San Francisco share their reminiscences of that city's nightmarish "war zone" in the early, horrific years of AIDS, We Were Here creates a harrowing, streamlined oral history.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    This bio-documentary of a New Left godfather presents a formidable character simpatico with today's zeitgeist in his championing of "spontaneous uprising."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Lionizing a world-class architect without tipping into hagiography, this documentary performs a graceful cinematic dance around his works.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Goss's film carries its unique forms of narrative suspense, but her 16mm images imbue both the forbidding landscape and her characters' scientific aerie, though the observatory only dates from 1932, with a poetry of the seemingly eternal.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    A righteously outraged documentary targeting the "warm and fuzzy" iconography of the breast cancer fundraising bureaucracy and its camouflage of corporate priorities.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    A direct-cinema document of the Cairo protests that toppled Mubarak, Stefano Savona's film doesn't pretend that Egypt's resolution has yet won a lasting victory.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    The layered, character-driven drama may subvert expectations of a sunny Venetian noir, but observes its five principal characters with a probing, egalitarian eye.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    It chronicles the quest of a self-described "geek," and there are pleasurable frissons of discovery in the detective work.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Godfrey Reggio's symphony of pristine 4K images doesn't add up to one grand epiphany, but an intermittent cluster of small ones.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    The result isn't drama so much as a waking nightmare of play-acting and predestined doom.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    A historical melodrama that retains an ancient, elemental pull even as it insufficiently charts motivation and the self-denying values of antiquity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Terri, a generously spirited dramedy in the high-school-misfit genre (indie division), finds director Azazel Jacobs taking a calling-card approach to his second feature.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Handsomely mounted and shot with an eye for nocturnal Parisian mystery by Guillaume Schiffman, Gainsbourg somewhat mercifully peters out after the grande scandale of the provocateur's reggae version of "La Marseillaise," which earned him the wrath of French patriots.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    An understated--and at times, clinical to a fault--Oedipal drama of long-simmering resentment and familial love's ambiguities, I'm Glad My Mother Is Alive risks bringing chilly subjectivity to sensational raw material.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    With six protagonists serving as a cross-section of Tehran's youthful population, director Hossein Keshavarz's Dog Sweat is a somber, minor-keyed debut feature about the daily manifestations of oppression in contemporary Iran.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    A freeform, New York-based variation on the Arabian Nights tales by Jonas Mekas is both a pan-narrative and a disarming portrait of its sweetly curious maker.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Gambling on the unlikely redemption of a doom metal fuck-up, this potential rock-doc tragedy reveals a bromance of idol and idolator.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    A night of reckoning by a hoodlum in his haunted former home is a more sober and remote Freudian farrago than one expects from Guy Maddin.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Re-employing the tools of Jacques Tati and Jerry Lewis, this pleasant fable reclaims artful slapstick with a bliss that's hard to deny.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    This documentary on the many forms of human debt, though often frustratingly broad, offers a path to balancing civilization's ledger with a hard-nosed brand of altruism.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Ultimately comes off as curiously anecdotal, lacking the dramatic dynamism that could give Marcel Pagnol's tale new life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    A serviceable primer on the digital-celluloid divide in commercial cinema, if a bit unwieldy in scope and in danger of being made obsolete by the next version of the RED camera.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    While crediting free-form radio pioneer Bob Fass with changing the culture of broadcasting, this documentary remains clear-eyed about the decline of community radio and the New Left.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    This chronicle of two athletes throwing baseball's funkiest, least respected pitch is given depth by their stranger-than-fiction underdog status and camaraderie with mentors who've had the same struggles.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Though its ballast of jokes and spectacle are formidable, it often lurches about at a remote, enigmatic distance
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    True to Hollywood's tireless efforts to fit square-peg material into roundish genre niches, this wavering, intermittently smart story of daring to think differently flattens its narrative into formula.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    Germain's bonhomie with the bistro regulars has the feel of a TV comedy pilot, which is more than can be said of the monologues he speaks to his cat, one on the inadequacies of the dictionary.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    It reaches a peak of dramatic anguish in star Rachel Weisz's single moment of naked fury, rather than through the tenacity and compassion that define her crusading title character.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    A mixed bag of Nixon-era pop burlesque and vampire kitsch is ultimately undone by pedestrian gags and bloated genre boilerplate.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    A lumpy spoof of electoral mudslinging that offers some bracing bipartisan contempt amid the lowbrow, labored slapstick.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    A documentary of bareknuckle fights among feuding Irish Traveller clans can't give the participants' self-perpetuating, dead-end rivalry the scope of tragedy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    A bubbly 90-year-old mascot from the golden days of the American musical, this doc's subject is certainly larger than the conventional testimonial treatment she's given.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    Both brutal and sentimental, this Oscar-submitted Korean war drama offers up rusty tropes as telling ironies.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    This handsome mate-swapping drama never moves beyond the erotic to become incisive about the barriers built into sexual experimentation for committed couples.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    A Slovakian character study of a boy ambivalently caught between worlds that ultimately squanders its promise.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    In a character study of an ex-con who gives her heart and mind to animals rather than people, Melissa Leo's risky performance is ultimately framed with a disappointing, distanced pity.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Weber
    LisaGay Hamilton and Yolonda Ross play persuasively embody modern urban feminine strength, but they're eventually stranded in a recycled road movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Weber
    Anonymous leaves one bereft of any meaningful knowledge of these personages or the theatrical energy of their age, and earns the obscurity it figures to acquire even if the war between Team Edward and Team William blazes on.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Weber
    Brighton Rock never brings its baby-faced hood antihero, the scarfaced Pinkie Brown (Sam Riley, pouting and hunched in the late-DiCaprio manner), into a semblance of human plausibility.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Weber
    A pseudo-investigative documentary shakily committed to the subject of subliminal messaging in America, but curiously indulgent about giving the singer of Queensryche time to spout off about whatever enters his head.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Weber
    The weightlessness that dominates the film is no special effect.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Weber
    Adhering to what is apparently a formula for national superproductions, 1911 throws dates and names on the screen with unceasing speed and frequent irrelevance -- gratuitously identifying a walk-on as "German diplomat."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Weber
    Alternately maudlin and snarky, Norman just doesn't risk enough, and can be consigned to the status of what the school drama geek would call "some contemporary, obscure, teen-angst thing."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Weber
    The movie's deathblow is the casting of poet-artist Miss Ming as Mammuth's affectless niece, whose twee verse and sculpture make Miranda July seem like a bearer of gravitas.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Weber
    A dry dream of postmenopausal-male sexual lethargy, this comedy's least musty ideas are among its worst.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Weber
    A banal "poetic" drama of a grieving stranger licking his wounds in a bayside Michigan town.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Weber
    An ostensible Danish "Hangover" that more closely resembles "Two and a Half Men" with nudity and unexpurgated dick jokes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Weber
    This adaptation of a prize-winning Australian novel is a stodgy slog save for some sporadic moments of blunt force supplied by Judy Davis and Charlotte Rampling.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Weber
    Director David Frankel can't lend the inflated sitcom dilemmas of the characters any life, and most mysteriously screenwriter Howard Franklin, whose work in the '90s frequently had appealing quirk and flavor, gets the dubious credit for adapting a 1998 nonfiction book about these hobbyists' pursuit of pink-footed geese and Northern Shovelers.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Weber
    Lacking both spiritual and narrative spark, Vera Farmiga's directorial debut suffers from her flat performance and a moribund, weirdly sex-joke-spiked narrative.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Weber
    Beginning of the Great Revival is muddled, all right, but it's the helter-skelter speed at which it ticks off names and incidents, both in hopelessly confused action and on-screen text, that seems nearly unprecedented.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Weber
    The ill use made of the stars' charms in this initially strained, then egregiously dopey mushfest can likely be credited to market-tested notions of modern popular romance.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Weber
    "With age comes exhaustion," according to a rueful line late in the film, and it serves as a fitting diagnosis for Woody Allen's latest fallen souffle set in a European cultural capital.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Weber
    Endng in risible bathos, Tony Kaye's urban high school melodrama is all about the cute teacher's crises and the girls who love him.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Weber
    Bille August's film is a protracted, soporific trip into Portuguese history that would like to be a romantic thriller.