For 85 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 16% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 81% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 13.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chris Cabin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 46
Highest review score: 100 Inherent Vice
Lowest review score: 12 What Maisie Knew
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 24 out of 85
  2. Negative: 46 out of 85
85 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    When Jérôme Bonnell allows his two magnificent leads to work at the sparse dialogue, he invokes a powerful, elemental sense of frank, sexual discussion and high-end flirtation, imbuing the relationships with a maturity that's loathsomely rare in films today.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    For the most part, it's a gas, but the light touch Raymond De Felitta gives the material is at once its saving grace and its tremendous limiter.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The narrative doesn't want for ambition, but Marc Webb proves unwilling, or incapable, of making this unwieldy story feel like anything but a deluge of backstory.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    It only conveys the awesome strangeness of its characters and their universe when director Brian Singer breaks away from the perpetual build-up of the film's unwieldy plot.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Stuart Murdoch clearly knows quite a bit about crafting pop tunes, but the film's consideration of the work of songwriting is totally flippant.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The flippancy toward the story's thematic concerns and character construction suggests that the film, like the boxtrolls' myriad gadgets and inventions, was largely built from used parts.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The film devolves quickly into a pedestrian character study that basks in Gary Webb's public shaming and victimization, losing sight of the bravery and probing talent that characterized his writing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Much like his hero, Christopher Nolan's goal seems to be to take the humor and wildness out of imagination, to see invention in rigidly practical and scientific terms.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    A would-be thriller masquerading a long, dry monument to the reliability and comfort of community, blindly cocooned by its own nostalgic self-regard.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Offers all the ingredients for a great feast of enticing visions and thematic concerns, only to have them be prepared, plated, and served with the grace of Elmer Fudd.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Arvin Chen's Taiwan is dominated by eccentricity in tone and atmosphere, but in a very careful, pronounced way, as to never really run the danger of being truly strange.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Tina Gordon Chism's film collapses into a series of clumsy improvisatory sketches, tied up in cheap, risibly sentimental catharsis.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The art of storytelling is both of distinct narrative interest and personal issue in the latest payload of calcified nonsense from one of modern cinema's oddest would-be auteurs.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    All its faux-patriotism isn't played for satire, but instead utilized to align the film with an idyllic, unquestioned vision of goodness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The script's jumble of plot asides and family-friendly pandering is enough to make you want to root for a hero.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Praises the electric carelessness of teenage angst while depicting it as if it were ultimately no more exciting, though no less pleasant, than an hour in the wave pool.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    It's hard to ignore the fact that a substantial percentage of Letourneur's would-be character study is dedicated to concentrated Schadenfreude that's unbalanced and without any real narrative weight.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Enough can't be said about how the late James Gandolfini comes so close to saving writer-director Nicole Holofcener's latest articulation of white suburban anxieties.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Ron Howard's by-the-seat-of-your-pants aesthetic makes the slower, darker sequences feel hurried and bland, especially when stacked up next to the racing sequences.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The songs still sound great here, but the instruments aren't amplified nearly as much as the nostalgia and vanity of the men who wield them.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Gavin Hood relays a vague sense of what it's like to live in duty, and yet at a distance from one's home, but this vision of the future never rouses, never asks to be remembered.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The film's half-hearted plea for responsibility and ethics in the news, after joyfully rolling around in its corruption for the majority of its runtime, smacks of plain pandering.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The film refuses to openly engage the isolationism and hardened cynicism that's often part and parcel of being a career police officer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The meager comeuppance and hasty notes of sweetness that end the film feel pre-approved rather than organically realized.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Whatever the film's interest may be in the marginalized, writer-director Richard Ayoade never alludes to what would even be worth fighting for in this nightmarish industrial landscape.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    There's no sense of visual artifice to match the ludicrous pitch of the script, and subsequently, the film comes off as awkward and uncertain.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Jon Favreau's film comes off as flippant in its view of independent labor as a universally liberating experience for an artist and businessman.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Whereas a single, stinging one-liner would have sufficed Jacques Tourneur or Fritz Lang, Frank Miller's overcompensating flood of pulpy dialogue only renders his characters flat and sans empathy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    All of Scott Frank's thematic concerns are little more than window dressing for a run-of-the-mill detective story in line with '90s thrillers like The Bone Collector.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    It essentially uses a major global issue to cheaply dress up what is two hours of hit-and-miss erection jokes.

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