For 107 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 17% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 81% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 13.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chris Cabin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 46
Highest review score: 100 A Touch of Sin
Lowest review score: 12 Winter's Tale
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 33 out of 107
  2. Negative: 56 out of 107
107 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    It does well to put more focus on delivering a plethora of jokes, imitations, zippy repartee, and sight gags than its plot's familiar machinations.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    Worry and sadness are palpable, but so is wry humor and irony as Song ponders age and mortality with a sensitive eye for emotions and a strong sense of composition.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Chris Cabin
    In the third act, the film devolves into an extremely unsettling series of sadistic tortures, the kind of stuff that would appeal largely to fans of Funny Games.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The film is nothing without the physicality of the performers, as Joss Whedon's script handles the transition of Shakespeare's language to modern day indifferently.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    For the most part, it's a gas, but the light touch Raymond De Felitta gives the material is at once its saving grace and its tremendous limiter.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    We're only allowed an insufficient glimpse of the anxiousness and curiosity that drive these creatures, a tactic which feels suspiciously like hesitance masquerading as enigma.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The film's aesthetic is marked by off-tempo editing and a tone that vacillates between grim and coy, and though it's occasionally visually evocative, it's also unmistakably over-calculated.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The narrative doesn't want for ambition, but Marc Webb proves unwilling, or incapable, of making this unwieldy story feel like anything but a deluge of backstory.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Though occasionally aesthetically alluring and evocative, feels like an introductory chapter to a more substantive, sprawling study of the actor.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    After a while, the film's sing-a-song-for-the-world vibe, so buoyantly optimistic at first, becomes grating and smug.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Stuart Murdoch clearly knows quite a bit about crafting pop tunes, but the film's consideration of the work of songwriting is totally flippant.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    If there's a general air of emotional authenticity woven throughout all this garden-variety, faith-in-family hokum, it's in the racing scenes.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The films that Robert Rodriguez emulates here are known for similar unexpected narrative turns, but the crucial value that he misses is their actual cheapness.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Though the cast partially eschews the family-friendly timidity that the film defers to in the end, this would-be wild thing remains little more than a rowdy endorsement of the status quo.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    Much like his hero, Christopher Nolan's goal seems to be to take the humor and wildness out of imagination, to see invention in rigidly practical and scientific terms.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    It only conveys the awesome strangeness of its characters and their universe when director Brian Singer breaks away from the perpetual build-up of the film's unwieldy plot.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The flippancy toward the story's thematic concerns and character construction suggests that the film, like the boxtrolls' myriad gadgets and inventions, was largely built from used parts.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The filmmakers cut the film to emphasize the story's familiar plot points, rather than highlight any instances of personal visual artistry.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    When Jérôme Bonnell allows his two magnificent leads to work at the sparse dialogue, he invokes a powerful, elemental sense of frank, sexual discussion and high-end flirtation, imbuing the relationships with a maturity that's loathsomely rare in films today.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    The film devolves quickly into a pedestrian character study that basks in Gary Webb's public shaming and victimization, losing sight of the bravery and probing talent that characterized his writing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Cabin
    All Is Bright remains engaging, for the most part, but most of the big narrative turns feel both predictable and forced, and at odds with the natural charms of the cast.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Gavin Hood relays a vague sense of what it's like to live in duty, and yet at a distance from one's home, but this vision of the future never rouses, never asks to be remembered.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Enough can't be said about how the late James Gandolfini comes so close to saving writer-director Nicole Holofcener's latest articulation of white suburban anxieties.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The film is ntermittently inventive in its visual and physical effects, but its politics are unthinking and obvious, a cheap anti-authoritarian tantrum imbedded in an intergalactic action-melodrama.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The art of storytelling is both of distinct narrative interest and personal issue in the latest payload of calcified nonsense from one of modern cinema's oddest would-be auteurs.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    Whatever the film's interest may be in the marginalized, writer-director Richard Ayoade never alludes to what would even be worth fighting for in this nightmarish industrial landscape.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The meager comeuppance and hasty notes of sweetness that end the film feel pre-approved rather than organically realized.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The underlying, redundant, and underwhelming theme of the film is the pursuit of family unity at all costs.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    All of Scott Frank's thematic concerns are little more than window dressing for a run-of-the-mill detective story in line with '90s thrillers like The Bone Collector.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Chris Cabin
    The film's half-hearted plea for responsibility and ethics in the news, after joyfully rolling around in its corruption for the majority of its runtime, smacks of plain pandering.

Top Trailers