For 401 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chuck Bowen's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Unforgiven
Lowest review score: 0 Queen of the Desert
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 90 out of 401
401 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Elena is a film deeply concerned with class resentment, but the filmmakers' attitude toward their titular character is disconcerting and even shocking.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    The conclusion is a testament to the fact that authentic justice is probably only attainable by accident.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Marc H. Simon's documentary has the thrust of a great American noir or black comedy.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Aquarius is a critique of a daydream that has the imaginative daring to live that very dream anyway.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Throughout Harmonium, writer-director Kôji Fukada works in a rapt and lucid hyper-textural style that suggests a merging of the sensibilities of Alfred Hitchcock and Yasujirô Ozu.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Mapping the intersection between history and emotion, Michael Almereyda finds himself in Alain Resnais terrain.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Clint Eastwood startlingly grips the audience with his sense of hypnotic silence, which carries suggestions of what might be termed politically apolitical pragmatism.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    In its visceral purity, Jairus McLeary's film drags male toxicity up into the light, offering it as a cure for itself.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Anocha Suwichakornpong earnestly and ambitiously attempts to redefine cinema’s conventional grasp of consciousness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    It exhibits the spry subtlety of Jean and Luc Dardenne's films, and, consequently, it's possible that it will be similarly mistaken for a work of “naturalism.”
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Writer-director Boo Junfeng casually reinvigorates the prison drama, boiling its elements down to their primal essence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Appropriately, the images in the film, the most fluidly beautiful and resonant of Nathan Silver's career thus far, suggest flashes of memory relived from the vantage point of the future.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    As in Rodney Ascher's previous film, Room 237, the subject of obsession is complemented by a despairing attempt to process it, corral it, and somehow conquer it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Joe Swanberg's films have grown into a reliable relief from the competitive, dehumanizing freneticism of much of American culture, marked by an affirming and understated sense of decency.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    A preoccupation with the totemic materiality of cinema runs through Michael Almereyda’s documentary.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    It elegantly evolves from an absurdist comedy into a remarkably wounded and uprooted story of friends who're beginning to tire of their shared social cocoons.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Albert Maysles's portrait of Iris Apfel gradually emerges with cathartic clarity without compromising her inherent mystery.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    The film communicates a sporadic sense of violation—of pastiche unpredictably giving way to a raw and primordially intimate emotional realm.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Throughout, direcgor Bill Morrison mixes documentarian detail with an ecstatic sense of poetry.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    The film has an artisanal intensity that prevents it from turning into a smug and predictable exercise in political revision.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Eliza Hittman's film captures the exclusive properties of sex with a degree of intimacy and empathy that, at times, feels authentically revelatory.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    The film ultimately understands poverty as a profound and often irreversible desolation of terra firma.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Reminiscent of Woody Allen's great, under-sung Manhattan Murder Mystery, it utilizes a pulp conceit as a shorthand for the regrets that bubble up in a marriage.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Coming Home is a film in which everyone's dreams are irrevocably broken, the pieces too small to grasp, let alone pick up.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    Andrew Bujalski seizes upon physical training as a resonant metaphor for the work and risk that are inherent in cultivating significant interpersonal connections.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    The film's thematic organization suggests the cinematic equivalent of a short-story collection, with haunting tangents and stray notes of poetry.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Chuck Bowen
    The film's plot isn't unusual, but director Ron Morales strips it down to its primal essence.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    There's an artisanal scruffiness to Win It All that testifies to Joe Swanberg’s quiet fluidity as a filmmaker.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    The doc is a sly, interesting achievement: It opens as an entertaining sports story and closes as a metaphor for government corruption.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Chuck Bowen
    Aarón Fernández captures one of the most heartening elements of sex: that it doesn't always oblige our rules or expectations.

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