For 169 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chuck Bowen's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Laurence Anyways
Lowest review score: 0 Skin Trade
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 89 out of 169
  2. Negative: 49 out of 169
169 movie reviews
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    A confident and exciting genre film, and that's certainly not nothing, but it has a slight impersonality that marks it as either a calling card or a work for hire.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Farhadi navigates his complicated narrative thicket with an apparent ease that confirms yet again that he's an amazing talent, but here he isn't able to blend the brushstrokes as he has in prior films.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    A potential barroom joke blossoms into a surprisingly poignant portrait of three aging men wrestling with how to shed their mortal coil.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    There are cheap shocks in the film, but there are also terrifying moments that poetically command our empathy.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Greatly cognizant of the revenge genre's penchant for hypocritical demagoguery, director Arnaud des Pallières unsettles the audience's usual feelings of vicarious blood lust.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    With The Sacrament, director Ti West has bitten off more of a premise than his classically modest barebones approach to horror movies can presently chew.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Álex de la Iglesia has a real flair for wild action sequences that remain exhilaratingly coherent and sensical.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The film preaches resolutely to the choir, and cinephiles in sync with the film's politics may still blanch at how snugly their interests are courted.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    There's a sense throughout of Steve James rushing and dutifully covering all his bases to evade accusations of creating a puff piece.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    It's informed with a subtle but disquieting subtext that insists on the pitfalls of allowing ideology to steer you away from common sense.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Michael Winterbottom and his gifted actors still haven't quite solved the riddle of portraying social disconnection in a manner that's anything other than sporadically involving.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    It waffles between dramatizing youthful self-absorption and succumbing to it, and this tonal instability comes to effectively mirror the domestic discord that's revealed to be its real subject.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Camilla Luddington refuses to predictably foreground her character's escalating fear, allowing us instead to see that fear as being at war with her inquisitive intelligence.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    You grow to feel as if you're arbitrarily changing the channel back and forth from a diverting horror film to a promising odd-couple comedy.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    This is, to put it mildly, a lot of information for one documentary, which inevitably devolves to resemble not so much an anthology as a slideshow of genocide's greatest hits.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The film is ultimately, and disappointingly, revealed to be a contraption that's less concerned with mental portraiture than with getting all of its expository ducks in a row.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The film soon settles into a confident, well-staged groove, primarily because of two unambiguously terrific performances.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The film effectively underlines the one undertaking that time-travel fantasies can never truly allow: escape from ourselves.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The images gorgeously embody both the fear and the beauty of James's exploratory experiments with socialization.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    After a surprising development, the film grows slack and sentimental, reverting to the survival-movie platitude about hardship making you a better human.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Chris Messina is eventually a little too indifferent to the machinations of the plot, but the film, however inescapably sentimental, is a romantic daydream that casts a lovely spell.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Quentin Dupieux has a talent for rendering otherworldly concepts banal in a manner that reflects the stymied desires of his characters.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Like other Niccol films, Good Kill is about an essential innocent who dreams of release from a highly structured, classist, and hypocritical environment.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    It has a problem that's familiar to competently made, sporadically involving crime procedurals: It's just good enough to inspire wishes that it were better.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    At least it doesn't make the biopic mistake of attempting to check off every moment of a man's life over the course of a few hours' worth of running time.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    It fails to go deep enough, suggesting an appetizer offered as an opening to an ultimately unserved meal.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    David Hackl often shoots his bear in fashions that accent its lumbering, powerful grace, even during its death rattle.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    Ken Loach's staging is so calm and sober that it turns his story into an expertly photographed yet weirdly remote rebellion tale.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The filmmakers maintain a tone that's mostly ideal for the contemporary equivalent of a drive-in movie: of reverent, parodic irreverence.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Chuck Bowen
    The narrative derives much of its tension from the unsentimental ambivalence Jon Watts displays toward the story's two pre-teen boys.

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