Clayton Dillard
Select another critic »
For 42 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 23% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 77% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Clayton Dillard's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 47
Highest review score: 88 Tales of the Grim Sleeper
Lowest review score: 0 Nothing Bad Can Happen
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 42
  2. Negative: 18 out of 42
42 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Clayton Dillard
    It's as if Carlos Saura were calling the bluff of spectacle-oriented narrative cinema that necessitates excusing its excesses with characters and plotting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Clayton Dillard
    Broomfield isn't so much dedicated to journalistic truth or social ethnography as he is displaying bodies and mindsets of individuals that complicate any sense of Manichean polemics, where good and evil must be reckoned with at a purely secular and corporeal level, particularly along the lines of class and gender.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    Lukas Moodysson's film allows its trio of girls to express themselves through gender, certainly, but not undermine their desire to be heard as artists first.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    Alex Gibney uses archival and Broadway footage so seamlessly that telling the difference between reality and recreation becomes not only difficult, but one of the film's central metaphors.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    Adept as both timely character study and epochal drama, Test wonderfully manages fully formed humanism without sentimentality.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    János Szász's film is a thoroughly provocative WWII screed that almost deliberately goes out of its way to avoid sentimentality or bathos of any sort.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    It avoids the typical trappings of the genre pastiche by utilizing its clear indebtedness to numerous other films as merely a starting point, rather than an end.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    The film's music is the city itself as well as a subtle suggestion that Tim Sutton's own digital cinema is just as elusive and intangible as Willis's unwavering sense of dissatisfaction.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    It convincingly reconciles private passion with public desire by suggesting that, for women in particular, the 21st-century limelight is always on, no matter the setting or venue.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    What progressively mounts tension is the film's understanding of a boy's gradually realized homosexuality as being inextricable from the central metaphor of compromised vision.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    Superbly acted and sporadically intriguing thriller, yet it has a difficult time locating more stringent meaning and significance beyond its outward narrative of duplicitous actions and veiled motivations.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    If it ultimately can't reconcile all that's presented in its too-brief runtime, that's largely because its situation, much like the dissonance between those involved, is comprehensibly irresolvable.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    It falls into the trappings of middlebrow literary adaptation by finding only sporadic means to convincingly adjudicate the trauma and anguish of its transitory epoch.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    The film finally works because of its multitudinous interests in adolescent shell-shock, where paralysis and uncertainty can only be momentarily assuaged through gendered outrage.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    Jennifer M. Kroot plays things a bit too straight and safe by giving into basic emotional and thematic possibilities of each period in Takei's prolific early life and subsequent Hollywood career.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    Thomas Allen Harris's documentary consistently takes agency away from the art itself with a litany of talking heads.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    Jan Ole Gerster seems infatuated with his main character, but to little avail beyond reveling in his aimless despair.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    Alejandro Jodorowsky never manages to transcend the sense that he's indulging himself and participating in a hollow introspection unworthy of his prior cinema.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    Most disheartening is how the female leads aren't given ample space to develop as dynamic characters beyond the most urgent confines of the script's scenarios.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    Daniel Auteuil's less exercising diligent homage than indulging troglodytic cinephilia.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    The proceedings have such a rigidly determined structure, amplified by chapter titles, that the power and conviction in their recountings deteriorate into a placid series of back-and-forths.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    Mark Jackson's direction strips much of the agency from any character's grasp by insisting that their dilemmas can only be revealed with stone-faced austerity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    There's edifying information in the documentary, but it's tainted by forced dramatic tactics.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    In abandoning a more vigorous discussion of class and race-based senses of entitlement, Marshall Curry reveals his goals to be less critical or rigid than passively honorific.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    An art-house con destined to make viewers who've ever used the term "mindfuck" as praise rack their brains trying to come up with alternate readings for a film that invites many but convincingly offers none.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    For all of the supposed passion and anguish in Saint Laurent's clothing and relationships, Jalil Lespert consistently neglects to imbue the film with such a comparable level of ambition or desire.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    Much like a spate of recent summer blockbusters, there's a tiring sense that every single facet of the narrative has to be rendered with truculent solemnity.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    The Decent One operates under a discursive premise so presumptuous and flimsy that its attempted function as an experiential documentary proffers little more than a book-on-tape-on-film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    Anthony Powell's vision as a filmmaker is frustratingly limited to an information-style presentation that doubles as an enthusiastic advert for the transcendental qualities of the terrain.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    If Junebug focused on quieter moments of extended family dynamics, with its city-meets-country clashes delving into resonant, region-specific sensibilities, Angus MacLachlan never goes beyond signpost sentiment.

Top Trailers