For 1,141 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The World's End
Lowest review score: 0 Sorority Boys
Score distribution:
1141 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    For the most part, it works beautifully as a movie without sacrificing the integrity of the opera.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Rather than a birds’-eye procedural about a complex international mission, it’s a close-up of that mission from the point of view of the participant who understands it the least.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The film's best moments are the quiet ones in which Oldman's ironically named Smiley provides the story with its wise, unsmiling soul.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This film may disappoint some dogmatic Old Hogwartsians: a few plot points have been sacrificed, and Mr. Cuarón does not seem to care much for Quidditch. But it more than compensates for these lapses with its emotional force and visual panache.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The Bourne Identity, like its hero, triumphs through sheer unreflective professionalism. It is, by today's standards, a modest thriller, with a self-contained storyline and with very few big special effects.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A wonderful movie, observant and hilarious and full of sad and beautiful truths.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A very funny movie, alive with a sense of absurdity and human foible.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    What distinguishes the film from its many peers is the quality of Ms. Collyer’s writing -- which rarely reaches for obvious, melodramatic beats -- and the precision of Ms. Gyllenhaal’s performance. She treats the character neither as a case study nor as an opportunity to show off her range, but rather as a completely ordinary and therefore arrestingly complicated person.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Lou synthesizes a wide range of styles and influences - from "Casablanca" to Wong Kar-wai - resulting in a movie that, for all its haunting strangeness, seems curiously familiar.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The resulting film is moving, charming and sad, a tribute to Ms. Briski's indomitability and to the irrepressible creative spirits of the children themselves.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    So wrenching and absorbing that you can easily lose sight of the sophistication of its techniques.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    It aims to be a great deal more than a standard geopolitical thriller and thereby succeeds in being one of the best geopolitical thrillers in a very long time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    It's all too neatly staged to make for dynamic cinema, even if the dialogue does crackle with a delicious nastiness.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    To watch Millennium Actress is to witness one cinematic medium celebrating another, an expression of movie love that is wonderfully eccentric and deeply affecting.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Above all else, Venus in Fur is a sharp, sexy comedy (adapted by Ives and Polanski from a translation by Abel Gerschenfeld) performed by two superb and superbly in-tune actors, and directed with a sure hand by a filmmaker who’s clearly not cowed by the challenge of blowing up a two-person chamber piece for the screen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    It's to the director's credit, and Pitt's, that Moneyball is anything but bloodless - in its own quiet, unspectacular way, this movie courses with life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like Statler and Waldorf, older viewers may kvetch and cavil about the details, but when that red velvet curtain goes up, we wouldn't give up our balcony seats for the world.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    By making the camera an observer, we get a perspective that often comes out of horror movies, a choice that whips the ordinary with the terrifying, an unforgettable mix.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    It has a familiar, lived-in feel, and if its observations of rural life at a time of political turmoil don't feel terribly original, they are nonetheless absorbing and sometimes powerful.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    I call it wondrous because, in spite of lapses and imperfections, a few of them serious, Mr. Burton's movie succeeds in doing what far too few films aimed primarily at children even know how to attempt anymore, which is to feed - even to glut - the youthful appetite for aesthetic surprise.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Leaves you with a sense of quiet, chastened grace.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Captain America isn't a masterpiece, but it's a solidly crafted, elegant adventure movie that held my attention from start to finish and sent me out into the street energized instead of enervated.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The passions of "Plata Quemada" are as bold as the images.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Hogan understands both themes, and his filmmaking style is a perfect mixture of wide-eyed wonder and slightly melancholy sophistication.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    In its own modest, genial terms, the picture succeeds: it never wants to be more than charming and sweet, and it invites us to imagine London as a cozy, happy small town where coincidental encounters are everyday occurrences.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The nearly flawless execution of a deeply flawed premise.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like a dream within a dream. Its images and emotions are vivid, disquieting and also hermetic, and while it may frustrate your desire for clear storytelling and psychological transparency, it has an intensity that surpasses understanding.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This is no tale told by an idiot — on the contrary, it’s a funny, fast-moving parable about fame and ambition, laid out for us with care and craft by a gifted filmmaker, a long-missed actor, and a world-class cinematographer. But I’m left with the suspicion the whole thing may signify — well, if not nothing, at least a good deal less than the filmmakers would have us believe.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The latest movie from Spain to use the conventions of the thriller to explore knotty and fascinating philosophical questions.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This is a grippingly original work, with gorgeous cinematography by Christopher Blauvelt, and the first hour or more achieves something like greatness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    This elegantly hand-drawn caper doesn't have a lot to it - a little girl and her cat help break up a Parisian crime ring, un point c'est tout. But it moves to a different rhythm than the animated spectacles we're used to - it's sparer, less hectic, less cute - and the difference feels welcome and refreshing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Jones and Redmayne are both superb as a devoted but imperfect pair of headstrong people trying, and sometimes failing, to treat each other with care and respect.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Jody's story is told with so much heart -- and his character is acted with such a winning combination of playfulness, vulnerability and sexual dynamism by Mr. Gibson -- that you can forgive the occasionally incoherent storytelling, the overwrought moments and the haphazard, unconvincing excursions into dream and fantasy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Compassionate though it is, this is not a movie that offers much in the way of solace. It insists that there is no end to human weakness, and not much cure for it either. That's pretty strong stuff.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Clever comedians that they are, they have also rigged Team America with an ingenious anti-critic device, which I find myself unable to defuse. Much as it may pretend otherwise, the movie has an argument, but if you try to argue back, the joke's on you.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    If there is heartbreak in this movie, there is also a sense of energy that makes it almost exhilarating.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    What it lacks in originality and narrative momentum — even more than Nemo, Finding Dory is in essence a loosely connected series of comic-suspenseful chases, bookended by heart-tugging moments of family separation and reunion — this new movie makes up for in psychological acuity and sensitivity.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Linklater may not have set out to make a decade-spanning triptych of poetic meditations on youth, young adulthood, and middle age, but he, Hawke, and Delpy have accomplished exactly that. The Before series has steadily gotten better as it goes along, which is more than any but the most optimistic among us dare to hope for from love.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Tabloid is the perfect movie for that night when you can't decide whether to see something low- or highbrow. It's seamlessly and satisfyingly both.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A gorgeous entertainment, a feast of blood, passion and silk brocade. But though the picture is full of swirling, ecstatic motion, it is not especially moving.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Ms. Testud's performance, which earned her a César, the French Oscar, for most promising actress, is the source of the movie's lingering, troubling power.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Lincoln does sometimes get a little sappy around the edges. Though his project here is clearly one of conscious self-restraint, Spielberg can't resist the occasional opportunity for patriotic tear-jerking, usually signaled by a swell of John Williams' symphonic score. But in between, there are long stretches that are as quiet, contemplative, and austere as anything Spielberg has ever done.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    At once somber and mysterious, comical and sad. It shows just how lonely a crowded city can be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Corneau, an eclectic director with a mildly perverse sensibility, turns the conflict of cultures into a psychodrama that is at once lighthearted and intense.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    There is really no other way to categorize this splendid, crotchety artifact.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Though it goes to places as dark as any you could imagine, Room carries at its heart a message of hope: Two people in four walls can create a world worth surviving for, if they love each other enough.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A slow-burning suspense thriller about a trio of eco-terrorists conspiring to blow up a dam, it’s directed by Reichardt with the concision and elegance of a chess master.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    There's something old-Hollywood about Slate's dizzy-dame charm, and at the same time, something very modern about her unapologetic ownership of her own sexuality.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The tale, in any case, is so gripping, so full of improbable turns and agonizing reversals that it bears repeating, and Mr. Butler and Ms. Alexander tell it straightforwardly and well.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The movie is a gaudy, noisy thrill ride -- hyperactive, slightly out of control and full of kinetic, mischievous charm.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    It's always hard to predict how a work of art will age over time, but I have the feeling that, like its three young leads, the Harry Potter series will turn out just fine.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Martin Campbell (who also directed Pierce Brosnan's first outing as Bond in "Goldeneye"), has chosen to give us a Bond who's both metaphorically and literally stripped bare. Let me take this opportunity to thank him for both.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Watching The Five Obstructions is at once like witnessing two chess masters playing dominoes and like spying on a series of therapy sessions. Mr. von Trier clearly sees himself as a maniacal psychoanalyst.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Strikes a difficult and necessary moral balance, refusing to succumb to hopelessness but also refusing to rule it out.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Rarely has the basic nature of visual perception seemed so frightening.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Your attention is rewarded by a film of surprising depth and a few deep surprises.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like most great musicals, though, this one slides, with breathtaking ease, from silliness to pathos and freely mixes exquisiteness and absurdity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Whatever your opinions about the war, the conduct of the journalists who covered it and the role of Al Jazeera in that coverage, you are likely to emerge from Control Room touched, exhilarated and a little off-balance, with your certainties scrambled and your assumptions shaken.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Holy Motors, a movie that's beyond weird, and beyond beautiful.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    It’s well worth seeing, both for its merciless anatomization of the country’s post-Ceausescu social order and for Gheorghiu’s stupendous central performance as a mother so monstrous she makes Medea look like a pushover.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Nobody else working in movies today can make her (Keaton) own misery such a source of delight or make the spectacle of utter embarrassment look like a higher form of dignity.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The heart of Life Itself, and the part of the film that’s most instructive even for those familiar with Ebert’s story, is the long middle section dealing with his stormy, never-resolved relationship with Gene Siskel.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Christine Jeffs's film is an emotionally rich biography of the poet Sylvia Plath, who is played with radiant conviction by Gwyneth Paltrow.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    As sublimely warming an experience as the autumn sun that shines benevolently on the vineyard owned by the film's central character.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    If you're willing to let go of your Hollywood-bred expectations for a movie of this type-spectacular action set pieces, constant pulse-pounding music, a killing every 15 minutes-The American is a great pleasure to watch, an astringent antidote to the loud, frantic action movies that have been clogging our veins all summer.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    It is an enormous improvement over the brainless, patronizing teenage romances that have slouched into (and quickly out of) theaters in recent years. But it could, if the filmmakers had trusted themselves and the actors a bit more, have lived up to its title.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Jaa, blessed with astonishing muscle definition and a stoical, sensitive face, clearly has the potential to be an international action movie star, and Ong-Bak feels like the start of a scrappy, potent franchise.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Whereas the original was a work of speculative science fiction - a chin-stroking fable about evolution in the nuclear age - this revisiting of the Planet of the Apes myth is an animal-rights manifesto disguised as a prison-break movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    A graceful and sympathetic look at how the lives of teenagers intersect with a work of literature.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The very existence of Four Lions is an act of audacity; the fact that it's also smart, humane, and frequently hilarious is nothing short of a miracle.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like many musicals, The Blind Swordsman works better in individual scenes than as a whole. Mr. Kitano is not the most disciplined storyteller, and the plot meanders along tangents and stumbles into flashbacks, losing momentum for long stretches in the middle.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    At first House of Sand may seem like a stark tale of survival, but a surprisingly lush and colorful romance blossoms in its bleak and gorgeous desert setting.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    What emerges from the chaos may be uneven and at times ridiculous, but it's never boring.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Mild, harmless and occasionally affecting, possessing the fizz of diet soda and the sweet snap of slightly stale bubble gum.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The director’s sometimes absurd bravado — along with Forest Whitaker’s grave, wise performance in the title role — is what gives this outsized and sometimes lumbering film its irrefutable emotional power.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    An intellectually engaging movie. But Mr. Jia's careful objectivity and regard for material detail are not matched by narrative rigor.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Like an uncommonly artful and well-acted after-school special. I don't mean this as a put-down: its combination of realism and fretful moral inquiry is best suited to the tastes and sensibilities of young teenagers who devour young-adult fiction.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Acting is not really the point of this movie, which seems to arise above all from Mr. Spielberg's desire to reaffirm that he is, along with everything else, a master of pure action filmmaking.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Certainly Shrek 2 offers rambunctious fun, but there is also something dishonest about its blending of mockery and sentimentality. It lacks both the courage to be truly ugly and the heart to be genuinely beautiful.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Mr. Boe keeps a safe distance from his characters' inner lives, he does succeed in conjuring an atmosphere of elegant melancholy and metaphysical anxiety.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Though a dramatic (even melodramatic) narrative eventually takes shape, what you remember is the succession of moods and observations through which it emerges.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Small-scale and loose. It feels oddly long for a Woody Allen picture, but its relaxed, casual air gives the humor room to breathe, and a gratifyingly high proportion of the piled-up one-liners actually raise a laugh.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    In any case, what is on screen is a delightful respite from awards-season seriousness - a feather film, you might say, that actually tickles.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Crude, unpolished, yet curiously dreamy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Walks the delicate boundary between politically inflected realism and costumed sentimentality.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Of all the twists in Catfish-the most surprising of all is what an honest and thoughtful film it turns out, against all odds, to be.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Even when Prince-Bythewood (Love and Basketball) tries to pack too much around the edges (including critiques of record-industry sexism and the mechanisms of black political fundraising), the romance at the movie’s center remains credible and vibrant.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The violent scenes veer vertiginously between slapstick, soft-core pornography and raw documentary, leaving you repelled and confused, as well as fascinated.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Elf
    A charming, silly family Christmas movie more likely to spread real joy than migraine, indigestion and sugar shock. The movie succeeds because it at once restrains its sticky, gooey good cheer and wildly overdoes it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The movie is, above all, a showcase for its stars, who seem gratifyingly comfortable in their own skin and delighted to be in each other's company again, in another deeply silly, effortlessly entertaining movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    It's Depp as Barnabas that holds the movie together. The story may be less than coherent and some of the minor characters washouts, but when he's on-screen, there's energy and humor and that foppish sex appeal that (as in the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie) reminds you why you once liked Johnny Depp.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    So unlike most Hollywood coming-of-age stories as to seem downright revolutionary.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The film's warm, sweet sentiments are genial and unchallenging, and its jokes are low-key and gentle.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    It is hard not to admire the independence and ambition of The Beautiful Country, even if the film does fall short of its epic intentions.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Land of Plenty, is like a clumsy, well-meaning intervention in a family quarrel. Mr. Wenders may not have the power to heal the rifts his movie acknowledges - and his account of them may not always be persuasive - but there is nonetheless something touching about his heartfelt concern.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    As powerful as Foxcatcher can be scene to scene, there’s something maddeningly indistinct about it at times, as if the details that would make it all make sense remain somehow inaccessible to us.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Ray
    While not a great movie, is a very good movie about greatness, in which celebrating the achievement of one major artist becomes the occasion for the emergence of another.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Café Lumière stands in relation to "Tokyo Story" as a faint, diminished echo. It is nonetheless a fascinating curiosity, a chance to witness one major filmmaker paying tribute to another in the form of a rigorously minor film.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    He (Ford) slips into the role as if it were a pair of well-worn loafers, the left inherited from Peter Falk, the right from Clint Eastwood, and then proceeds, with wry nonchalance, to tap-dance, shuffle and pirouette through his loosest, wittiest performance in years.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The inhospitability of the land emphasizes the spare precision of the narratives and helps to give them an atavistic power, as if they were tales that had been handed down since the beginning of time.

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