For 1,183 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dana Stevens' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 45 Years
Lowest review score: 0 Sorority Boys
Score distribution:
1183 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Despite its technical and visual grandeur, there’s a moral simplicity to Silence that can sometimes recall the work of perhaps the other greatest deeply Catholic filmmaker, the French master Robert Bresson.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Fences functions as a faithful—sometimes doggedly faithful—record of a remarkable ensemble performance of one of the great works of American drama. Granted, it’s never exactly a great movie, but given the chance to see actors of this caliber tear into material this rich, you would be foolish to pass up the chance.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    For all its borrowing and bricolage, La La Land never feels like a backward-looking or unoriginal work. Even when not every one of its risks pays off the way that first song does, this movie is bold, vital, funny, and alive.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Through two viewings of Jackie, I was never able to pin down whether it was Portman’s performance or Larraín’s way of framing it that left me emotionally shut out.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Each character in this movie — down to the smallest cameo by Lonergan himself — is an individual rather than a type, prone to spontaneous changes of mood and sometimes amusing outbursts of pettiness or ill humor.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    For people who enjoy coming out of movies unsettled, a little riled up, bursting with questions, and spoiling for a debate, see Elle.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    One thing that Loving gets right in a way that few civil rights dramas do: It insists on racial discrimination as a systemic problem, not merely an interpersonal one.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Moonlight is one of those movies that showers its audience with blessings: raw yet accomplished performances from a uniformly fine cast, casually lyrical camerawork, and a frankly romantic soundtrack that runs the gamut from ’70s Jamaican pop to a Mexican folk song crooned by the Brazilian Caetano Veloso. But the film’s greatest gift may be that flood of cleansing tears—which, by the time this spare but affecting film was over, I was also shedding in copious volume.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Her (Reichardt's) juxtaposition of imponderably vast landscapes and regular-scale individual lives is what gives Certain Women its mood at once of delicate restraint and of moral gravity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    The performances, whether from novices like the sensational Lane or professionals like LaBeouf, Keough, and Patton, are at once naturalistic and emotionally precise.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    Still, the movie’s mores can feel cluelessly retro as the ever-dithering Bridget lurches between one man and another.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Sully can feel like a dutiful, hagiographic slog, even though its actual running time barely tops 90 minutes and both Hanks and Eckhart give warm, understated, funny performances in the only two roles developed enough to qualify as real characters.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Cianfrance’s gift for allowing his actors to create relationships — with one another, with the camera, and with the stark landscape that surrounds them — makes The Light Between Oceans an unusually captivating romantic drama, at least until that last-act slide into self-sabotaging bathos.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    Sumpter nails the first lady’s air of warm but reserved composure and the slow, careful way she enunciates her words, as if putting an extra measure of thought into choosing each phrase.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Dana Stevens
    I wish there were more films every year like Morris From America, the kind that surprise you by revealing a hidden side of something—an actor, a genre, a situation—you thought you had figured out.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Streep, who has long enjoyed playing women endowed with more than the average supply of gusto, makes the character’s delusional faith in her own talent so infectious that we ache at the thought of Florence’s impending humiliation even as we prepare ourselves to laugh at it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The dad minds behind Bad Moms don’t seem to understand, or be terribly curious about, the minds of mothers.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Star Trek Beyond may not go where no Trek has gone before, but it’s that very fidelity to the show’s original values that will keep fans trekking to the box office.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    The real reason to see it — as was the case with the original, and with the past two Feig/McCarthy collaborations, "Bridesmaids" and "Spy" —has to do with the universally excellent cast who establish an easy tone of camaraderie and loopy banter.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    In short, The BFG seems perfectly self-sufficient in its bookness, in no need of the lavishly cinematic bear hug Steven Spielberg bestows upon it here.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Dana Stevens
    The disaster sequences themselves — of which there are many, placed at regular intervals but disconnected from the story, like operatic arias — have a dreamlike and weirdly exhilarating quality that’s quite different from the plodding wham-bam destruction of the average action blockbuster.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    What it lacks in originality and narrative momentum — even more than Nemo, Finding Dory is in essence a loosely connected series of comic-suspenseful chases, bookended by heart-tugging moments of family separation and reunion — this new movie makes up for in psychological acuity and sensitivity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Dana Stevens
    The Hateful Eight is bold, gorgeous, verbally clever, morally repellent, and, in some way I am still struggling to put my finger on, possibly somehow evil. Any movie that inspires mixed feelings that intense can, I suppose, be said to have done its work on the viewer. But I’m not sure the work The Hateful Eight performed on me was what the filmmaker intended or that it’s an operation I would consent to again.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    Whatever combination of practical effects and digital wizardry went into the technique that gave rise to Anomalisa’s otherworldly yet very human narrative universe, I hope it will be used to tell more stories, perhaps by this same storyteller.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    45 Years is about the relationship of the present to the past and of our past loves to our present lives—a relationship that, like any good marriage, remains a total mystery.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Dana Stevens
    Joy
    Joy the movie never cohered, for me, into a story with forward motion. The minute the film begins to find its footing in one tonal register, it switches to another.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dana Stevens
    Like their Star Wars forebears, Boyega’s Finn and Ridley’s Rey are brave, funny, and admirable but also imperfect, uncertain, and sometimes afraid. That is to say, they’re genuine, multisided characters with believable motivations—no small victory in a movie designed with the express purpose of breaking world box-office records.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    It plays the whole absurd shell game for laughs, even as it acknowledges that the last and bitterest laugh is on the rest of us.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Dana Stevens
    In the early days of Einar's transformation, Redmayne conveys the degree to which gender is, for all of us, a skill acquired through observation and imitation.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Dana Stevens
    The director Todd Haynes and the novelist Patricia Highsmith fit together like a hand and glove - a beautifully manicured hand and a sleek gray-green leather glove, two images that figure prominently in Carol.

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