For 626 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Denby's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Talk to Her
Lowest review score: 10 Wild Wild West
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 626
626 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    A raffishly ironic and insinuating movie--and probably the most sheerly enjoyable film of the year so far.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Fish tank may begin as a patch of lower-class chaos, but it turns into a commanding, emotionally satisfying movie, comparable to such youth-in-trouble classics as "The 400 Blows." [18 Jan. 2010, p. 83]
    • The New Yorker
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    The movie’s story is conventional in shape, but it has passages of crazy exhilaration and brilliant invention.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    When the movie was over, a young boy sitting behind me said, "That was great!" He was satisfied, and rightly so.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Revved by the stage performances, the cast courses through the material with disciplined exuberance--especially the eight young actors at the center of the drama, many of whom have never appeared in a film before.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    If you don't mind the gore, you can enjoy Snowpiercer as a brutal and imaginative piece of science-fiction filmmaking. [7 & 14 July 2014, p.94]
    • The New Yorker
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    World War Z is the most gratifying action spectacle in years, and one reason for its success if the Pitt doesn't play a superhero. [1 July 2013, p.76]
    • The New Yorker
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    The movie is a moralized historical fantasy, mixing love and politics in Old Hollywood style. Yet I can’t bring myself to be indignant about its inventions. Gugu Mbatha-Raw, who was born in Oxford and has acted since she was a child, speaks her lines with tremulous emotion and, finally, radiant authority. Austen, I think, would have been thrilled.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Scott may always have had an eye on the box office, but from "Alien" and "Thelma & Louise" on, he has made women into heroines. In that regard, he's still ahead of the curve. Rapace's scene is a classic of its kind; it tops John Hurt's notorious misfortunes in "Alien."
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Sex is the subtext of everything that happens, yet this may be one of the least erotic movies ever made. It's stern and noble, very much in the Rattigan spirit. [26 March 2012, p.108]
    • The New Yorker
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Abe is blustery and self-pitying, but, with Solondz's new tender mercies fully engaged, Gelber makes you feel close to a guy for whom nothing was ever meant to go right.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    The Farrelly brothers, who directed, take physical comedy to levels of intricacy not seen since silent movies.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Apatow’s richest, most complicated movie yet--a summing up of his feelings about comedy and its relation to the rest of existence.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Friends with Benefits is fast, allusive, urban, glamorous - clearly the Zeitgeist winner of the summer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Vignettish and offhand, but it’s extremely pleasant, and it suggests what can be done with lightweight equipment and a loose-limbed approach to the right subject. [19 May 2003, p. 94]
    • The New Yorker
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Flags of Our Fathers is an accomplished, stirring, but, all in all, rather strange movie
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Unimaginable as anything but a movie. It’s largely wordless, sombrely spectacular, vast and intimate at the same time, with a commitment to detailed physical reality that commands amazed attention for a tight hundred minutes.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    With the screenwriters Alice Arlen and Victor Levin, Hunt adapted the story from a 1990 novel by Elinor Lipman, and has turned the material into a fine, tense, unpredictable comedy of mixed-up emotions and sudden illuminations.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    We get tired of watching Whip fail, and we're caught between dismayed pity and a longing to see him punished. Only a great actor could have pulled off this balancing act. [12 Nov. 2012, p.94]
    • The New Yorker
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    It's an expertly made, intentionally minor movie, though when Monroe, doping herself with everything available, lies in bed, confused and hapless, there are depressing intimations of the end to come.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Noah may not make much sense, but only an artist could have made it. [7 April 2014, p.74]
    • The New Yorker
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 David Denby
    Jude Law, saying farewell once again to his youthful good looks (Dom has scars and a little too much weight), makes this hyper-articulate ruffian the most intricately soulful character in current movies. [7 April 2014, p.75]
    • The New Yorker
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Denby
    Allen's new movie, Match Point, devoted to lust, adultery, and murder, is the most vigorous thing he's done in years.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Denby
    Black holes, relativity, singularity, the fifth dimension! The talk is grand. There’s a problem, however. Delivered in rushed colloquial style, much of this fabulous arcana, central to the plot, is hard to understand, and some of it is hard to hear. The composer Hans Zimmer produces monstrous swells of organ music that occasionally smother the words like lava. The actors seem overmatched by the production.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Denby
    For all the beauty and power of Road to Perdition, there's not much spontaneity in it, and the movie's flawless surface puts a stranglehold on meaning. [15 July 2002. p. 90]
    • The New Yorker
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 David Denby
    One may be horrified by these two, or laugh at them, but both horror and laughter give way to amazement at the human talent for survival.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 David Denby
    Midnight has one big problem: Allen hardly gives Gil a perceptive moment. He's awestruck and fumbling - he doesn't possess, to our eyes, the conviction of a writer. But who knows? He's young.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Denby
    These small-scale, intelligent movies can fall into a trap: it’s hard to achieve a satisfactory dramatic climax when observation is your principal dramatic mode.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 David Denby
    It's only at the end of Blue Ruin that my pleasure drained away. [28 April 2014, p.86]
    • The New Yorker
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 David Denby
    A dramatic failure, but, at its best, it offers a frightening suggestion of the way terror can alter reality so thoroughly that, step by step, the fantastic becomes accepted as the mere commonplace. [5 May 2003, p. 104]
    • The New Yorker

Top Trailers