For 49 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 69% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Hughes' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 West of Memphis
Lowest review score: 40 Season of the Witch
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 49
  2. Negative: 0 out of 49
49 movie reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 David Hughes
    Michael Haneke's Palme D'Or winner is uncomfortable, uncompromising, unflinching... and utterly unmissable. Old age may not be a reality you wish to confront, but you must see this film.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 David Hughes
    Insightful, revelatory and profound, Moreh's Oscar-nominated documentary combines riveting interviews, archive footage and - yes - state-of-the-art photographic effects to offer a unique perspective on the Israel-Palestine issue.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    It's a surprise to see Wim Wenders embracing 3D in its full, feature-length glory but the medium works well to capture the graceful swirl of the German choreographer's work.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Although the monochrome photography will invite comparisons with Manhattan, Frances Ha is closer in spirit to Godard than Woody Allen. Anchored by a charming performance from Greta Gerwig, it’s as light and breezy as a walk in Central Park, and just as refreshing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    With a debut film, Katalin Varga, shot entirely in Hungarian, Strickland isn't one for the easy option. This excellent follow-up plunges into equally unusual terrain with similarly pleasing results
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 David Hughes
    Prepare to be shocked, disturbed, awed... and, if you expected justice to prevail at last, ultimately devastated.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    A eye-popping visual treat and a journey into the creative spirit.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    An indie with real pedigree and smarts, Holofcener's comedy of manners is well-observered and well worth watching.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Beautifully performed and tough as nails, Vinterberg's social drama could not be any more timely.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Unlucky to miss out a Best Foreign Film Oscar, this moving war flick is a nerve-jangling odyssey into the underground world.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    The Duplass brothers enter the mainstream with a touching, original and supremely funny film, whose improvisational style sets it apart from other comedies, and marks the emergence of two major new talents. Great performances, too.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    It's hard to imagine that the prodigiously gifted Dolan is still in his early twenties. This is another work of marvellous maturity and assurance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Given the obvious influences on The Double, it could have felt like a facsimile of other films. Instead, it has enough individuality, imagination and idiosyncratic invention to identify it as a true original.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Walker was Oscar nominated for Waste Land this year, and while this occasionally unfocused doc doesn't hit those heights, it's still a valuable and scary film that should be seen.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Sarah Polley's second film is a masterfully painted portrait of an ordinary marriage under threat, dominated by a central performance of exquisite subtlety and observation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    A documentary of two halves, Gibney's character study of Armstrong is tough and forensic. But whether through a lingering admiration or the film's origins as a straightforward celebration of the cyclist's talents, there are moments when its powder remains a little dryer than perhaps it should.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    July's second film, while not quite as perfectly realised as her debut, nimbly avoids the 'sophomore slump', providing the curious with another window into her highly idiosyncratic world.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Six years after "Little Miss Sunshine," Dayton and Faris deliver a comedy that sparkles with wit and substance. But from the script to her portrayal of the title character, Ruby Sparks belongs to Zoe Kazan, who joins the likes of Sarah Polley and Brit Marling in the rarified ranks of actress/screenwriter double-threats.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    An extremely interesting insight, proving that rap music is an art form in its own right.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Weir couldn't make a boring film if his life depended on it, and for any other director The Way Back would be laudable. It's good, but from this director we have come to expect great.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    While it doesn’t defy genre conventions like "Cabin In The Woods," Wingard’s tale of a dysfunctional family under siege is an outrageously entertaining crowd-pleaser — if you have the stomach for it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Funny, whimsical and as warming as a big bowl of Irish stew.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Gregg Araki's sci-fi is a weird and, just occasionally, wonderful skew on the college comedy. Slight but fun.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    Powerful, moving and melancholy. A low-key treat.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    There's undoubtedly comedy mileage in an irreverent sending up of the Signs/Magnolia school of everything-is-connected philosophy. Despite the calibre of the cast, the Duplass brothers mostly fail to find it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Moving if low-key, Jim Loach's debut feature is proof that compassionate, socially conscious filmmaking runs in the family.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    Chilean writer-director Sebastián Silva’s neither-fish-nor-fowl narrative plays tricks on our minds, without fully engaging our senses.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    A loopy joy from start to finish, Bradley Cooper proves that he's the real deal.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 David Hughes
    With his fourth film as writer-director, Judd Apatow has arguably made his most personal film yet, without forgetting to make us laugh.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 David Hughes
    The ever-versatile Winterbottom's loose and limber adaptation doesn't entirely mesh with Hardy's more formal narrative, leaving this feeling disjointed and underpowered. Nevertheless, there's still plenty to enjoy in the director's customary flourishes.