David Sterritt

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For 2,004 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Sterritt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou
Lowest review score: 0 Head Over Heels
Score distribution:
2004 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    What really hurts is the movie's shallow screenwriting, self-indulgent acting, and woozy camerawork.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    It's encouraging to see Hollywood tackle themes of faith and religion, but here, too, Shyamalan is timid, reducing them to fuzzy New Age clichés. Add wooden acting, stilted dialogue, and a faux-arty style, and you have a thudding disappointment.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    This movie has promising ingredients. But you'll leave wanting much, much more.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    The film is as tricky and superficial as its low-life characters, using visual flimflam to mask its lack of substance.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    The gimmick behind the screenplay is clever, but the filmmakers don't rise to the challenge they've set themselves, merely spinning two unimaginative stories for the price of one.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    Luc Besson's screenplay is dumb, but has just enough weird touches to give occasional glimmers of interest.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    Like the nuclear sub it's named after, the picture is big, shiny, and expensive. It's also cold, hard, and cumbersome, and lacking the barest hint of emotional or psychological depth. [9 Mar 1990, Arts, p.10]
    • Christian Science Monitor
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    Can a mild-mannered toxicologist and an eccentric Alcatraz veteran stop him before it's too late? Learning the answer means sitting through more than two hours of violence, vulgarity, and all-around excess, served up with high-tech trimmings by director Michael Bay.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    Shots of blood and naked bodies clash bizarrely with Coppola's more quaint and engaging notions; the result may be intended as a dialectical encounter, but seems more like a head-on collision.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    The animation is deft but the screenplay is stilted, the voice-performances are unimaginative, and the whole project is surprisingly clumsy in its efforts to please young and old alike. A major disappointment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    In short, this isn't a poignant drama about courage and imagination -- it's a contrived fantasy about courage and imagination.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    Davis contributes his usual dignity -- not easy when you're playing a character who thinks he's John F. Kennedy dyed black -- but it's not enough to save this silly thriller-comedy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    The picture is effectively made, but viewers will want to erase the horrific violence that erupts in scene after scene, leading to an unusually mean-spirited finale.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    The acting ranges from adequate (Jared Leto, R. Lee Ermey) to awful (Lindsay Crouse and everyone else).
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    As he showed in the recent "Catch Me if You Can," also a Hanks vehicle, Spielberg has little talent for emotional realism, not to mention psychological suspense. He should scurry back to "Jurassic Park" as soon as the next flight leaves.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 David Sterritt
    John Hughes pours his usual slickness and sentimentality all over everything. [27 Feb 1987]
    • Christian Science Monitor
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    The movie is a mish-mash of action-adventure clich├ęs, book-ended with lame attempts at psychological interest. Written, directed, and acted with ham-fisted heaviness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    A romantic comedy-drama has to make sense, though, and Love Actually doesn't, actually.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    Stiller strives to be a wild and wacky villain, Vaughn endeavors to be a likable and average hero, and both fall flat on their faces, like everything else in this unspeakably stupid comedy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    It has a degree of sociological interest, but it would be more effective if the material were shaped into a more coherent form.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    The picture goes for sentimentality rather than substance every chance it gets, and the cast falls right into its syrupy trap.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    The rest of Franco Zeffirelli's latest Shakespearean outing is so eager to be cinematic, with its peripatetic camera and souped-up screenplay, that it forgets to make sense.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    Add a megadose of bombastic James Horner music and a perfunctory love-affair subplot and you have a movie that's its own worst enemy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    Action freaks may enjoy the chasing and chomping, but there's no hint of human interest or moviemaking imagination.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 David Sterritt
    The message of the film is that life isn't neat and predictable like a well-arranged business trip; yet everything in the picture is so calculated that there's no life to it. [23 Dec 1988, A& L, p.19]
    • Christian Science Monitor
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    The filmmakers seem well in control of their chaotic material, but what can be said when the movie features wall-to-wall teenage alcohol abuse.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    A total lack of chemistry between the stars -- neither of whom is particularly good at romantic comedy in the first place -- and you have a promising package that grows steadily less lovable as it goes along. Down with this movie!
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    Nicolas Cage, Ving Rhames, and Steve Buscemi are among the few performers who emerge with a shred of dignity at the end.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    The problem with Possession isn't that it's filmed in a lackluster way, but that it shouldn't have been filmed at all. Byatt's novel is an adventure in language, telling its story through a kaleidoscopic array of Victorian-style poetry and prose, alongside gripping accounts of the characters' activities and escapades.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 David Sterritt
    This is a great subject for a movie, but Hollywood has squandered the opportunity, using it as a prop for warmed-over melodrama and the kind of choreographed mayhem that director John Woo has built his career on.

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