For 287 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 29% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 70% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dennis Lim's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 48
Highest review score: 100 Primer
Lowest review score: 0 Love, Honor and Obey
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 84 out of 287
  2. Negative: 93 out of 287
287 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dennis Lim
    The film is a model of precision and economy, from the scrupulous framing and editing to the dryly note-perfect performances.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dennis Lim
    The final scene is as close to perfection as any Amerindie has come in recent memory--in a single reaction of Marnie's, we see a small but definite shift in perspective; abruptly, Bujalski stops the film, as if there's nothing more to say. It's a wonderful parting shot for a movie that locates the momentous in the mundane.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dennis Lim
    With remarkable directness and composure, it shatters the myth of childhood innocence and the deathless taboo of prepubescent sexuality.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dennis Lim
    An all-access fan's valentine as artfully scrappy and likably wide-eyed as its subjects.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dennis Lim
    Like "Blissfully Yours" and Apichatpong's first feature, the exquisite-corpse road movie "Mysterious Object at Noon" (2000), Tropical Malady promotes new ways of seeing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dennis Lim
    On a first viewing, the movie seemed a dilution of the formal strategies Jia had perfected-at once less dispassionate and less empathetic. After a repeat viewing, it still strikes me as Jia's fourth-best film (that it's one of the year's best says plenty about the level at which he's working), but it's more apparent that The Worl d's muffled emotional impact should be understood as a function of its setting.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dennis Lim
    An engrossing quartet of hour-long films by British documentarian Adam Curtis, doesn't so much challenge Freud's theories of the unconscious as shadow them through the corridors of corporate and political power. What emerges is nothing less than a history of 20th-century social control.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Dennis Lim
    Best understood as a memorial…Like most memorials, it is respectful, premised on competing obligations to the dead and the living, and eager to stress that the deaths were not in vain. It not only tells us we should never forget but also illustrates how we should remember.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dennis Lim
    Cavite is such a shrewd melding of form and content that any seeming contradictions and shortcomings end up working to the film's advantage.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dennis Lim
    As botched-drug-deal tales go, Pusher digs surprisingly deep— its surface clichés give way to an existential despair that finally swallows the movie whole.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    As a historical document, 24 Hour Party People may be most meaningful to fans whose epiphanies were experienced at least one remove away -- at a different place or time.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Less interesting for what it has to say about evil -- namely, that it's banal/unknowable/random/everywhere -- than for the microsurgical procedures it performs on genre conventions and expectations.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Constipated English whimsy for the easily tickled.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Swinton provides her own brand of incandescence, doubling as the film's aching heart and its center of gravity.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    A nostalgic coming-of-age sex comedy tastefully lecherous enough to indicate that its intended demographic is several decades past puberty.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    For a quality horny-Italian-teen frolic, you need look no further.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Neither sardonic nor slapstick enough, Bandits is framed as a flashback -- which merely heightens the general feeling of inevitability.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Gray's brand of film-buffery manifests itself, simply and irresistibly, as ardent, uncynical movie love.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Captures the latent anxieties of a hazy, ambling existence with pinpoint accuracy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Thrives on vivid incidentals and telling details.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    A "guilty pleasure" -- only it's the sort of film that would mock anyone who felt guilt in pleasure.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    A humane, unassumingly quirky rumination on chance and caprice.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Using vagueness as a crutch, Charlotte Sometimes makes a fetish of opacity. Still, whether or not it's a pose, the film's poised reticence is refreshing in context -- a rebuke to the contemporary crop of blabbermouthed American indies.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Enemy of the State isn't really a smart film, but it makes a concerted stab at pretending to be one.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Weirdest, funniest studio release of the summer so far and a bona fide cult object in the making.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    The movie might test your tolerance for the mystical, but its whispery vagueness is of a piece with the luxuriantly grainy atmospherics.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    This Canadian cheapie plays like an above-average "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" episode, filtered through the sensibility of early David Cronenberg.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    As square-shouldered as you'd expect of a National Geographic co-production. But Bigelow hits all her marks and more within the narrow parameters.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Built on a foundation of cinephilia, Cinemania is a valentine of sorts to this movie mecca (you have to love a city, and a film culture, that can sustain such bottomless appetites).
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Dennis Lim
    Come Undone's true subject is, simply enough, the perspective-warping enormity of first love, as preserved in a scrapbook of before-and-after snapshots.