For 330 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1 point higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diane Werts' Scores

  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Those Who Kill: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Running Wilde: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 48 out of 330
330 tv reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Hip, clever and hilarious...A sparkling little character study, quirky comedy, relationship drama and all-around delight. [5 Oct 2000, p.B43]
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Wallops don't get more walloping than the one that arrives at the end of the premiere of FX's adult cop show The Shield. Won't tell you what it is, and don't you dare read other reviews in case they blab it. This is one of those punch-in-the-stomach moments of TV you'll want to remember being stunned by. Although The Shield looks pretty dang good to that point - or pretty %@$#! good, as its characters would swear - the show suddenly becomes flat-out brilliant. [12 Mar 2002, p.B27]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Man, is this a good show...Boomtown is so good, it single-handedly restores your faith in broadcast networks. They can compete with the "freedom" of premium cable. All it takes is creative smarts. And NBC's Boomtown has plenty of those. [27 Sept 2002, p.B02]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Nobody tries to be funny here, so they're more hysterical than the folks falling all over themselves elsewhere. They're simply hopeless specimens of spoiled humanity who haven't a clue how to operate in the real world. [2 Nov 2003, p.04]
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    "Galactica" is so beautifully designed, shot, edited and acted that you can practically smell and taste its emotional validity.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Best show of the season? Call me crazy, but it's a loopy-twisted-serpentine whodunit revolving around a whip-smart teenage girl...So let's recap. Engaging star, cool characterizations, witty scripts, meaty backstory. What's not to like? Only that networks always cancel deliciously offbeat gems like this. Let's hope UPN doesn't actually want to be a "real" network, after all. [22 Sept 2004, p.C01]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Every character bursts with life here, in what may be the most fully realized show on TV. [13 Aug 2007]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    This show captures a distinct culture, and the people jockeying for places in it, trying to prove, mostly to themselves, that their lives have value. And so Friday Night Lights has more than almost any network show today. [5 Oct 2007, p.B33]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Party Down took awhile to jell, but it has hit its stride as one of TV's most finely observed comedies.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Even film school snobs like me can learn a thing or 10 from Moguls & Movie Stars. The breadth and depth of information rushing through each hour is astonishing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    For a show forever detonating bombs, it's surprising how sweet and frothy Tara feels. Just a half-hour long, it doesn't waste a second, pulling a gun within the first few and no punches ever.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    As real as real gets, invaluably adding human understanding to a hot-button topic.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Showtime lets them take their time to spin serpentine story lines, gradually pulling us deep into one very sticky, scary web of intrigue.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Whether it's Brent's starry-eyed foppishness, Dawn's artistic daydreams or Gareth's organizational stiffness, these are characters we don't see on American TV. They're not accomplished, clever or distinctive. But they're so well-observed, and so subtly personified, that it's as if we're finding amusement in people we know. [21 Oct 2004]
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    The first three episodes totally nail it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    They [directors John Dorsey and Andrew Stephan] know how much to say, and show, to viscerally deliver the sights, sounds and even smells, without scaring us away.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Owner's Manual looks as sharp as you'd expect from cinematic-minded AMC -- whip-pans, slo-mo, montage, animations, infographics. Sounds great, too, with heart-pumping action music and industrial power sounds. Best of all, homework-doer Marcus (aka Sweet Cheeks) and scoffer Ed (or is that English Muffin?) are natural bicker-buds throughout, adding life and laughs to each half-hour that flies (or rolls) by.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    It's hilarious, and sad, and ironic, and rich.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Humor is also key in the capacious pilot hour directed by John Madden ("Shakespeare in Love"). Subsequent episodes echo its deft balance of epic scope and whimsical humanity.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    The documentary cannily employs Goldberg's enthusiasm and some clever animations over Moms' audio routines to keep this lost legend's influence in the forefront.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    They know how to nail situations/characters, while snappy edits cull fluff, leaving only comic gold.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 100 Diane Werts
    Disturbing. Magnetic. Hold your breath. Watch.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Garcia's single-camera editing amplifies the comedy inherent, rather than being a crutch to create it. And the casting here is as good as "Earl," which is saying something--even if Leachman goes a bit off the rails as wacked-out "mamaw."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Producer Beers' team is the gold standard in male-aimed reality, and these guys have grit to burn.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    With two shopping trips in each half-hour, TLC's latest hit is so fast-paced--and such giddy consumerism--that it's fairly irresistible. Also educational.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    The soul of the show, though, is its conflicted "heroes," truly tortured, in palpable ways, recalling the best, early days of NBC's ill-fated Monday comic book. There's no cartoonery here. Just adult adventure and angst.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    This evocative hour doesn't lionize Steinem, but simply lays out what happened.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Fascinating documentary--and extremely effective commercial.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    The show's core relationship is appealingly relaxed. It dares to suggest successful coupledom lies less in heated passion than in being able to dress down and screw up and know you're still loved.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    It all adds up to one solid nail-biter, with a profusion of clever clues that seems to cast suspicion on everyone.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    You can see Neverland as sly philosophical discourse, or you can see it as fantastically produced adventure. Just make sure you see it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    No matter where you stand on the death-penalty debate, this is must-watch revelation--and, thanks to Herzog, tense and suspenseful drama.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    [These women make] instant impact, of course, with their stories but also through sheer personality.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Strong personalities evoke the hold of the old, the tug of the new, and that intersection's human fireworks.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Bracing and tasty.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Sincere host, unguarded participants, sensitive treatment. And more cool stuff!
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    It's less the Plot Events that ring true here than the well-played little side moments and background squabbles, the simmering resentments and recriminations, the emotional tugs-of-war.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Browncoats Unite keeps the focus on the work itself. And that's what keeps "Firefly" afloat.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    The complex impact of the crime--and of its investigation, news coverage and town reaction--is the real story here, laid out in the decidedly ordinary faces and raw silent spaces that British drama delivers so well.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    A head-spinning, yet deeply humane, thrill ride.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    The Millers shows what a thing of glory hear-the-laughs sitcomedy can be in the hands of masters.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    There's humor, there's heart, you'll laugh when you don't expect to.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Complaining about the show's pre-fab structure is like shootin' fish in a barrel--no point to ask what's-the-point, no fair to ponder whether it's fair, because you end up with dinner anyhow, and folks gonna gobble it. Duck Dynasty is tasty enough.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    [A] strongly acted thriller, which seems to add another intense dimension weekly.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    [Bill Lawrence] scores again here, with an instantly appealing ensemble, from Astin's "soulless upstairs tool" to Rory Scovel as the downstairs dude from "a very competitive community college.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    The Assets isn't flashy, but boy, is it effective. It just grinds away, laying down intriguing details of "asset" care and feeding, made vivid through determined performances and intense crescendos.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Their [John Brownlow and co-writer Don Macpherson's] saga is so vividly shaded, even minor characters resonate.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Lizzie Borden takes an ax to many assumptions--including the one that Lifetime movies aren't worth watching.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    We ultimately get to spend time with Henson's judges hashing it out. That brings insight into what makes things work, into creature logic, proportions, movement, performance facilitation, and letting the creation "emote through its environment." We don't just watch art being made, we come to understand the process.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Black Box creates compelling people while smartly pondering identity, relationships, connection--it doesn't need the amped-up atmosphere.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Finding Carter isn't some teen show. It's a stellar drama.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Nice to finally see a show nailing what it wants to be and say, in continually discerning work from Passmore, Szostak and series creator Sean Jablonski.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    This eccentric assemblage truly captures the distinct feel of Vegas-the night, the gallows humor of grisly work and the people who thrive on it. Sure, it's seedy, surreal and supremely specific. That's why we're hooked. [6 Oct 2000, p.B51]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    The producers' storytelling bravura grabs your guts from the first tense second and doesn't let go. [29 Oct 2002]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    This playful hour gets under your skin with its quirky personality humor, at the same time it's spinning a pretty fair murder yarn. [12 July 2002, p.B51]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    He's rude, sarcastic, bitter, brilliant and, delightfully, the most compelling character of the fall TV season. [14 Nov 2004, p.11]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    The most intriguing thing, actually, is that Lost may not even need the hoodoo voodoo. Abrams and script creator Damon Lindelof ("Crossing Jordan") have already set up a pretty compelling cross- section of earthlings as a study of simply human behavior. [19 Sept 2004, p.11]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    This stuff is good. No, superb.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    Like Hugh Laurie's irascible "House" title character, star Ellen Pompeo's newly minted Dr. Grey conveys such substance that you simply can't stop watching. [25 March 2005, p.B33]
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    There's a vibrancy here, and a clarity, that we haven't seen in network sitcoms in ages. The way ABC's "Lost" reconfigured dramatic storytelling, Showtime's Barbershop so invigorates the humor format that we hate to call it a sitcom. It's entirely its own animal. And that's evolution of a kind everyone can get behind. [12 Aug 2005, p.]
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    Sly as "The Larry Sanders Show," keener than "Fat Actress," more sympathetic than "Curb Your Enthusiasm," this new half-hour comedy hits the bull's-eye in every direction. It's funny, sad, smart and immensely appealing. [5 June 2005, p.11]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    Layering such unnatural proceedings into the family-drama format only intensifies both story angles when you do it right. And Cassidy has, with strong casting, solid structure and a fine feel for what's most frightening.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    It all flows from the heart in a way few shows do, unfolding with the ease of being surrounded by people you've known forever already.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    [A] rewardingly seasoned new drama series that's practically indistinguishable from the acclaimed feature film, except that it's better.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    This four-hour gem is exquisite from start to finish, rife with the texture of its place and time, rich with human understanding expressed in everyday articulation and small gestures.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    The 10 hours of PBS' immersive miniseries Carrier are frank and intimate, hard-hitting and heart-rending, rocking (with hit songs) and rolling (when the ship pitches so sharply, planes can't land).
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    Caprica feels torn between soulfully mature ruminations and adolescent "accessibility" for gamers wondering where the space action went. Let's hope the pilot's spellbinding second hour points the way toward greatness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    These actors are serious sitcom pros, and their show is actually about something genuine--sibling bonding/rivalry, parental button-pushing, relationship-building. It's nice to see some emotional meat in a live-audience staging again, feeding off the energy and reactions of real people.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    While critics like me count quibbles, kids of all ages should share my husband's assessment: "It's a superhero show. Superman flies. Give The Cape a little space."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    Future episodes aren't as snappy or scenic. But Shahi & Show deliver win-win, anyway.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    These stylish suits aren't empty, by any means. But we'll have to see if USA is truly willing to let its heroes' souls get emotionally naked.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    There's texture galore in this city-shot cop hour, eyed by handheld lenses echoing "Homicide's" edge (and director Peter Berg's "Friday Night Lights" intimacy).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    Science channel publicity materials call the show "a real-life Twilight Zone," and in terms of mood, that's on the mark.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    Robbins means business, calmly prodding family members--and not just the apparent aggressors--to truly comprehend where others are coming from. She calls people on their bull, eliciting not just tears from stress but tears of realization.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    Method makes a solid case for Lewis as underappreciated auteur.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    A great concept, mostly divorced from reality, with superb execution, just might extend forever.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    One thing you can say for USA: It knows what it's doing. It's got its shtick, and it's sticking to it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    The show has sneaky depth. The leads are pretty without being "pretty," refreshingly down-to-earth likable, and able to flesh out their youthful stereotypes with this weird thing called personality.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    Thought I was going to hate "Total Blackout." Then couldn't help laughing out loud.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    Bunheads seems to know exactly what it's doing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    The good Lord created sitcoms like The Soul Man as relaxing, relatable humor with heart, and Cedric's new creation isn't about to mess with His template.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    The characters hold promise, the show looks swell, the stories reflect rich history and the makers have earned our trust.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    Her shrewd, straightforward perspective and her semisweet, offhand attitude make her reflections fresh and relatable.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    The actors hit that soap sweet-spot between honest reality and lurid theatricality under direction from pros like Michael Apted and Catherine Hardwicke.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    The characters, scripts and performances are surprisingly smart--almost, dare I say, deep. And you still get the comic humiliations, nasty rivalries and teeny bikinis.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    Spader seems to be the only one who actually gets the gameplay here.... And the script seems to incite his appetite.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    The cast throws this curveball that catches the plate for a strike.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    Akerman has to be everything. Good thing she's a nimble actress.... Whitford is always winning, and even the poor exes find wiggle room inside their cliches.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Diane Werts
    Disney should be sent to detention for passing off such aural plasticity [laugh track], unfairly fouling the repute of the live-audience sitcom. But the rest of Girl Meets World does its job of bringing tween-based family viewing into the 2010s.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Diane Werts
    Angel upholds Whedon's spellbinding "Buffy" mantle and expands it, taking his surprisingly mature and witty view of life among the supernatural into an adult realm. [5 Oct 1999, p.B27]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Diane Werts
    Originally a half-hour sitcom, redeveloped into a light hour, this latter-day "Northern Exposure" creates its own eccentric, cantankerous, sweet and silly world. Can this wacky enchantment last? [6 Oct 2000, p.B51]
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Diane Werts
    We're talking major-league adult content here - from unblinking strip searches, to human branding, to brutal violence and language that the broadcast networks have never even thought about airing. But that's only an alert, not a warning, because this drama series from tube auteur Tom Fontana ("Homicide," "St. Elsewhere") packs a dramatic wallop as potent as its frankness. [11 July 1997, p.B47]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Diane Werts
    There's real thought behind The West Wing, a blessed exhilaration in this increasingly apolitical medium. For those who remember when '70s TV comedy took on the world, this is a welcome arrival. True, the pilot takes some fish-in-a-barrel potshots at sanctimonious evangelists, in Sorkin's speechifying manner from "Sports Night." But it also delivers that series' satisfying depth of reflection and rich characterization. Eventually. Once we know who these people are. [21 Sept 1999, p.B27]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Diane Werts
    This is just an action fairy tale, a modern Saturday afternoon serial or contemporary penny dreadful, designed to keep us hanging on its every outlandish turn by exasperating us, if necessary, with characters we love to hate and contrivances we delight in dissing. ... It's insulting to our intelligence. And we can't stop watching. [28 Oct 2003]
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Diane Werts
    We aren't just viewing this "Real World" from an objective point of view - watching people behave - but participating in a fresh way. Sorting through all those first-hand viewpoints, we're coming to understand where these diverse people are coming from and why they act the way they do. [19 May 1992]
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Diane Werts
    The show feels lived-in, making it all the more inviting to dwell there ourselves. [23 Sept 2003, p.B23]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Diane Werts
    The busy season premiere quickly constructs an intriguing seesaw of aspirations and emotions, and it's self-contained enough to sell itself to even Nip/Tuck newcomers.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Diane Werts
    A soul-deep sense of humanity grounds "Heroes."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Diane Werts
    "Big Love" does more this year than you might expect, and more richly, more provocatively, more dramatically and amusingly, too.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Diane Werts
    A rich character drama and riveting suspenser that makes Fox's "24" seem lackluster.