For 75 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 29% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 71% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ed Gonzalez's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Her
Lowest review score: 12 Nurse 3D
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 31 out of 75
  2. Negative: 26 out of 75
75 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Guillermo del Toro doesn't rise above the obligations of staging a film of this sort as a multi-level video game, a stylish but programmatic ride toward an inevitable final boss battle.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Its ostentatious sense of horror -- think later-day Argento -- is far from suggestive, though some of its queasier moments effectively tap into our fears of not-so-bygone forms of invasive physical therapy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    It's important to talk at length about Pariah's aesthetic because of how it distracts from the emotional truthfulness of the sometimes heartbreaking, by and large gorgeously performed story.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The film busts a fierce move but never relishes the unique cultural essence that its gentrifying baddie threatens to snuff out.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Like Magic Mike, Side Effects is enlivened by Soderbergh's jazzy style and laidback moralism, bringing to mind the work of another connoisseur of genre, Robert Altman.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    An anthology of found-footage horror shorts that exudes, sometimes extraordinarily, a neophyte's sense of courage and cluelessness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Its ideas are paralleled, its themes twinned, sometimes breathlessly, sometimes fatuously, into what may be described as a 164-minute pop song of seemingly infinite verses, choruses, and bridges. Perhaps expectedly, it soars as often as it thuds.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Léos Carax's maddening, self-satisfied, though never smug, game of spot-the-reference seems intended only for a particular type of cinephile.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Possibly year's most immaculate-looking drivel, a prismatically shot whodunit abundant in red herrings, but lacking in moral contemplation.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The states get higher with every breadcrumb Luis Tosar's creep lays down, and the film derives sometimes remarkable corkscrew tension from watching him being backed into a corner.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Despite its flaws, the film is at least a consistent vision, attesting through both its story and animation to the rabbi's right to be different while also striving for human solidarity.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Throughout To the Wonder, the new and old are incessantly twinned, blurred into a package that suggests an experimental dance piece.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Forlorn depictions of love and death may dignify Neil Jordan's film, but narrative withholding ultimately drives a stake into its unmistakable heart.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    I Killed My Mother is a film best heard than seen, as the earnest, nimble scrubbiness of Dolan's screenplay is ill-served by his conceited visuals, an aesthetic mode that feels insecurely borrowed from perfume commercials and the work of Jean-Luc Godard and Wong Kar-Wai.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Carlos Reygadas's latest, an almost impossibly intellectual film, keeps us at a remove that's as striking as that which separates its main character from the lower classes.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Matthias Hoene allows the cockney swears to flow as deliriously as the truly convincing blood splatter, offering a few unexpected gut-busters along the way.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Writer-director Charles Martin Smith's tin ear for dialogue and contrived symbolism is as unmistakable as his enormous heart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Una Noche tugged at my heartstrings, but the film's almost phantasmagoric fixation on sex can feel crass and dehumanizing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Bobcat Goldthwait exposes the characteristic male pursuit of power to which females are often made subservient.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The literalizing of Ivan Locke's hidden self and his inability to master it ultimately exposes the film as the squarest kind of theater: drama therapy.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    If the stock concessions made to genre cliché by The Woman in Black can be charitably viewed as deliberate tips of the hat to the heyday of Hammer Films, then John Pogue's period-set exorcism yarn The Quiet Ones more interestingly upends those tropes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    DeMonaco may doubly, sometimes triply, underline the story's governing theme of social power and how it's exchanged, but the rage and lucidity of these ideas resonate.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Eugenio Mira thrills in watching his main character attempt to worm his way out of a most unusual hostage situation, synching his indulgences of style to the pianist's wily physical maneuvering.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    While Jim Mickle's compositions lose much of their verve in the film's later half, his regard for the analog does not--and at the expense of perspective into his characters' emotional torque.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Through a mini-triumph of montage, what begins as run-of-the-mill backstory vomit is thrillingly repackaged as an almost-Lynchian duet between warring states of consciousness.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The film is dizzyingly creepy in its refracting of horrors through the cascading windows of computer programs we've come to understand more intimately than our own selves.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    This is a Hollywood-delivered chronicle of the immigrant experience that earns its justification through good will and tact.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    It keeps us at a remove that becomes telling of the filmmaker's reticence to explore whatever feelings of isolation and yearning may inform his main character's grisly compulsion.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Haneke's admonishments are disturbing only in the sense that they're never self-critical, and while watching one of his films, there's always a sense that he thinks he's above his characters, his audience, and scrutiny.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Every shot is painstakingly thought out, but less emphasis is placed on the human face than on the surfaces that reflect it and the objects that obscure it, and the overall effect is close to that of fetish art.

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