For 1,565 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Frank Scheck's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 51
Highest review score: 100 Best Kept Secret
Lowest review score: 0 Contract to Kill
Score distribution:
1565 movie reviews
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Depicting the travails of an emotionally troubled Manhattan woman who returns to the remote Maine village of her childhood, Frank the Bastard doesn't reward the viewer's considerable investment of time and patience.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Lavishly staged and beautifully photographed, Northmen—A Viking Saga features enough energetic sword clanging to satisfy its target audience.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Don't watch the new documentary The Lost Key if you want to have good sex. Well, to be accurate, don't watch The Lost Key while you're actually having sex. A strict taboo on televisions in the bedroom is one of the tenets laid down in this film whose tagline promises "The Universal Secret of Jewish Sexuality Revealed."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    While both plots work reasonably well separately, they're unnecessarily padded and don't tie together strongly. As a result, the film doesn't achieve its goal of its sum being bigger than its parts.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Featuring a stellar cast apparently seeking to prove that they're interested in being popular in red states as well as blue, Big Stone Gap goes down relatively easy, but it contains lots of empty calories.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    More trick than treat.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    The characters are defined in the sketchiest of terms, with Julia herself emerging as little more than a cipher. But as ciphers go, she's an arresting one, with Williams using her large, expressive eyes to powerful effect.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Trey Nelson's film can't help but evoke a feeling of déjà vu. But strong performances by Josh Duhamel and young Josh Wiggins (Max), plus haunting visuals of the barren Texas setting, provide some compensation for the narrative contrivances of Lost in the Sun.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    What should have been a tautly paced B-movie thriller instead comes to feel like a mini-series, leaving the viewer too much time to ponder the silliness of its narrative contrivances.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    While the violent sequences are very effectively staged, the results are a strange hybrid that doesn't quite work. Lacking the antic, witty humor of something like the similarly conceived Gremlins or the full-out gore of a traditional horror flick, Krampus never really finds it niche.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    For every emotionally resonant scene, there's another that seems to drag on pointlessly, although the filmmaker once again displays a talent for delineating the emotional tensions that develop when disparate characters are thrown together.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    American Hero, which intermittently uses a faux-documentary style to awkward effect, never quite decides what it wants to be.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    As spooky as The Shining's Overlook Hotel and Rosemary Baby's Bramford, the location -- actually multiple locations -- of the atmospheric horror film The Abandoned is spectacular. It's too bad that the same can't be said about the story.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    The proceedings too often smack of melodrama and, with the profusion of characters, some inevitably come across as stereotypes.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    While the screenplay by T.J. Cimfel and David White eventually proves unsatisfying in its plot revelations, the film certainly holds your attention thanks to Schindler's tautly paced direction and Riegraf's emotionally nuanced performance.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Stacey Menear's screenplay doesn't manage to sustain its clever premise, with the final act featuring a banal and formulaic revelation that unfortunately takes what had been a spooky haunted house tale into familiar slasher movie territory.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Doesn't delve deeply enough to be fully satisfying. Much like the drug it spotlights (to reference another journalism-themed movie), it will leave you hungry afterwards.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Vita Activa: The Spirit of Hannah Arendt wrestles with its unwieldy subject with only sporadic success.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    The uneven collection is guaranteed to permanently tarnish at least one of your favorite days.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Queen Mimi registers as little more than a minor curiosity.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    The film fares best when it slows down a bit and allows the Turtles' personalities, which are quite engaging, to shine through via their amusing comic banter.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Viewers will likely be as confused as the protagonist as to what is going on, and the vague, episodic proceedings ultimately prove repetitive.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Despite some clever touches, the derivative film doesn't manage to live up to its clever premise.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    The Best Democracy Money Can Buy certainly makes many valid points, but they tend to be lost amidst the overriding cutesiness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    The glacially paced film is ultimately more interesting for its ethnographic and technical aspects than its rudimentary storyline, although the marvelous deadpan performance by Nyima, an acclaimed Tibetan theater performer, provides a much-needed humanistic quality.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    For those less interested in horticultural matters, however, this Dutch documentary is akin to, well, watching plants grow. The sort of film frequently described as "meditative," it produces a calming but ultimately soporific effect.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Proves alternately inspiring and depressing even while skirting uncomfortably close to voyeurism.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    It’s all about as clichéd and predictable as it sounds, although the proceedings are mildly enjoyable in an old-fashioned, Andy Hardy sort of way.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    A reasonably entertaining popcorn movie experience.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Dallas Jenkins’ dramedy about a washed-up actor who learns the error of his ways through being exposed to religion doesn’t have an original cinematic bone in its body. But it’s also refreshingly genial and lacking in preachiness for a faith-based film, demonstrating that a lighter touch doesn’t necessary dilute the obvious messaging.

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