Glenn Heath Jr.
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For 48 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Glenn Heath Jr.'s Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 88 Rebirth
Lowest review score: 0 Glitch in the Grid
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 26 out of 48
  2. Negative: 10 out of 48
48 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Glenn Heath Jr.
    If Rebirth's subjects are active guides documenting a fluid psychological landscape, Jim Whitaker constructs a specific cinematic geography around them with stunning time-lapse photography of Ground Zero.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Visually glassy and smooth, Perfect Sense values the dynamic mood of each scene without being overly stylized.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Glenn Heath Jr.
    The endless scenes of burning buildings and macho posturing merely provide an action-driven context for the filmmakers to deal with more personal topics like loneliness and resiliency.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Heath Jr.
    R
    If the trajectory of R foreshadows tragedy early and often (what prison film doesn't?), the filmmakers manage to infuse quiet moments of reflection and panic into each man's traumatic experience.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Shit Year is a thematic twin to Billy Wilder's "Sunset Boulevard," both heightened fables about the slow disintegration of a retired actress mourning her now-dead career by retreating inward.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Not only does its incredibly loose aesthetic challenge the traditionally controlled and slick conventions of the cop genre, it adds a certain visceral haziness that compliments Brown's own professional and personal immorality.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Documentarian and subject, past and present blur together like bleeding watercolors in Raymond De Felitta's gripping memoir.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Heath Jr.
    The seamless juxtaposition of faith and pain, innocence and guilt, allows the film to transcend Spike Lee's occasional bombastic moments and become a strong examination of internal suffering.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Heath Jr.
    If the film covers well-tread territory (a morally bankrupt player trying to prolong his own influence), it does so with pinpoint control of mood and theme.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Throughout, it becomes clear that both the film and its subject are defined by the necessity of multitasking.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Walter Hill thoughtfully regards the pummeling power of weaponry at work.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Amy Seimetz's intoxicating slice of genre revisionism earns its "neo" prefix, envisioning a brightly sinister world where desperation is the new normal.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Heath Jr.
    The film is ripe with powerful subtext, specifically how greed, celebrity, and technology help to form a misguided sense of opportunity that keeps the working class downtrodden.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Heath Jr.
    A heartfelt retro flashback littered with pop-culture iconography and much slang, it focuses on the importance of friendship and loyalty rather than social standing.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Director Leon Ford displays a wonderful empathy in his examination of Griff and Melody's lonely environments, allowing their fringe perspectives to flower organically from the mise-en-scène.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Heath Jr.
    When considering the best voiceover artists in cinema history, Ryan Reynolds doesn't immediately come to mind as an especially dynamic one.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Heath Jr.
    This arc may sound particularly familiar on paper, but To Be Heard finds the unique passions and heartaches in all three stories, allowing the viewer to become invested in whatever outcome befalls each subject.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Watching Dennis Farina dominate every scene is a joy, and thankfully the actor makes the most of this opportunity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Using a whirlwind of archival footage, maps, and split screens, Edmon Roch conveys Juan Pujol Garcia's reign as Europe's premiere spy in a constantly fluid fashion, aesthetically mimicking his crafty and cagey nature.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Heath Jr.
    What sets Undefeated apart from the usual underdog sports story is how the filmmakers emphasize the importance of mentorship as something separate from on-the-field interactions between coach and player.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Heath Jr.
    It'd be unwise to dismiss Safe House as merely a clone of Tony Scott's manically inclined vision.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Heath Jr.
    A strange and intoxicating indie constructed as a series of vignettes that capture two children grappling with the overlap of trauma and nostalgia.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Despite being a nasty and skillful action film, The Day goes off the rails in the final stretch.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Heath Jr.
    People matter in Matthew Lillard's film; genre not so much.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Exquisite looking but substantially hollow.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Heath Jr.
    While Reversion sets up a complex communication platform for a universe being slowly ripped apart, it doesn't know how to relate this idea in human terms.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Heath Jr.
    If Barkin and Grondin create a swamp's worth of deceptive intricacies in their moments together, the rest of the cast is regulated to expository mop-up duty.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Daylight reaches an apex of terror that it never quite tops.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Heath Jr.
    The film's first act is wholly concerned with the juxtaposition of physical similarities and ideological opposites, and Tamahori spends entire sequences upending the balance between the two.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Heath Jr.
    Animation, motion graphics, and slow motion all pop up at some point, further splintering Sidewalls into a pandering pastiche of better films.