For 751 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Hank Stuever's Scores

Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Atlanta: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Scorpion: Season 1
Score distribution:
751 tv reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Long on concept and short on momentum, each episode of American Gods (there are eight, the first of which premieres Sunday on Starz) feels like the pilot for still another show and then another.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Hank Stuever
    Depending on how far it’s willing to press and poke at the issues it raises, Black-ish displays a welcoming sense of humor that might be illuminating in the present context.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Casual is occasionally surprising, sexually provocative and cruelly wry; despite some of the show’s faults--including a cynical through-line that occasionally reaches toxic levels of intra-family hurt and resentment--it is addictive and weirdly welcoming.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Vikings exceeds expectations, so long as those expectations aren’t up in “Game of Thrones” territory. What could be a silly exercise in quasi-historical swordplay is instead an earnest, tightly told family drama.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Diana, Our Mother is probably all we’ll hear from William and Harry this time around, and, to be entirely honest, it feels like just enough. Just enough of the anguish. Just enough review of her good works (visiting AIDS patients when no one else would, campaigning against land mines). Just enough rumination on her phenomenal wattage.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    It has a seamless and almost hypnotic quality to its narrative, and it’s easily one of the best debuts this year.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    One Mississippi is so much like everything else that it fails to stand out.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    The show immediately finds just the right balance between challenge and pleasure.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Ellis, particularly, gives a lead performance that is strong enough to mask some of the script’s problems.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Hank Stuever
    A powerful and unforgettably thorough HBO documentary, is not only an exploration of what happened (difficult questions linger, particularly about the response of the town’s police to the initial 911 call), it also invites a frank and remarkably even-handed discussion of what sort of punishment could ever fit the crime.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    An enjoyable dramatic movie.... [But] Because it’s a film both by and for the devoted, An Adventure in Space and Time tends to too easily revel in its own creation myth, veering quickly into a tidy, Hallmark-like ending.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Homeland is wearing a bit thin even while it nobly stays the course.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Empire’s one and only problem remains the ethical hollowness of its characters--even the “good” ones are prone to cruelty. Co-creators Lee Daniels and Danny Strong and their crew either can’t locate or do not wish to introduce an underlying moral tone to this story. That’s part of what makes it so rich and watchable, but it also leaves viewers used and abused.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Looking feels spot-on and real; it falters only when it occasionally pauses to let one of its characters gaysplain, in dialogue, a subject that it believes a larger audience might not get.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The good news about Sonic Highways is that it doesn’t have enough time to bore us to tears.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    We have to take the good things about Boardwalk Empire (the acting, the authenticity in its exquisite details and most of the writing) along with the bad (the repetitiveness, the plodding).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Hank Stuever
    Although the writing and storytelling in first episode (which Amazon first shared with its Prime customers earlier this year) come off a little clumsily, overall it’s a fascinating launch for an espionage series. The Man in the High Castle is also expertly and realistically imagined.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    With its masterfully prescient knack for melding international headlines with implausible tales of espionage, Homeland kicks off with parallel plots involving the Islamic State and a computer-hacking incident.... Carrie’s boss is demanding a high-security humanitarian visit to an ISIS trouble spot, and a viewer realizes that this updated Homeland runs the same as it always has.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Hank Stuever
    Wile I’d like to see another few episodes to make sure, there’s something comfortably gooey right away about This Is Us, reminding us once more that amid all the high-functioning detectives, emergency-rescue personnel and secret-agent superheroes covered in cryptic tattoos, there are very few network dramas aimed at viewers who are simply interested in everyday people and how they feel.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 30 Hank Stuever
    A passive-aggressive, implausibly meandering, poorly written and awkwardly acted effort that is mainly about miscommunication, delivering no more wisdom or insight about depression, bullying and suicide than one of those old “ABC Afterschool Specials” people now mock for being so corny.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Although no expense has been spared, House of Cards appears to suffer from the same ambitious but weighty seriousness that afflicted Starz's "Boss."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The first episode of Last Week Tonight (and, to be clear, it is only the first episode, with plenty of potential and room for improvement) demonstrated little in the way of innovating or improving on “The Daily Show’s” prevailing concept.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    The film, more than four hours long end-to-end, is the kind of solid but friendly documentary all celebrities dream of having made about them, awash in jaw-dropping sweeps of Malibu beach houses, visits to luxe mansion interiors and private-jet cabins, supplemented by drone’s-eye views of yachts and estates and perfect lighting everywhere Iovine and Dre go. Despite its fixation on provocative and at times harrowing (and even criminal) travails, The Defiant Ones never stops basking in the permaglow of their success.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    There’s a tender heart that beats beneath Loudermilk’s misanthropy, especially when it delves into his work moderating group-therapy meetings and his attempts to help a young addict (Anja Savcic) get her act together.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    These final episodes of "Downton Abbey" are among the show’s best since the first season.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    The beady-eyed Durst is a wily but generous interview subject, but where The Jinx really succeeds is in its fantastic attention to pace and detail, particularly in reenactments that are far and away better than what we usually see on “48 Hours,” et al.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    It’s a lot less fun now; when watching these new episodes, I found it impossible to complete any sentence along the lines of “I hope [blank] happens to [blank],” not counting my hope that poor Adam (Hannah’s increasingly complex boyfriend, played by Adam Driver, who now provides the show’s only gravitational pull) will come to his senses and flee.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    In the Flesh skillfully navigates several genres at once, all of them heavy, none of them comic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Though not as artfully constructed as Penny Lane’s excellent documentary “Our Nixon,” which aired last year on CNN, Nixon by Nixon is similarly judicious in its use of visuals and old footage.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    It takes at least five episodes for Indian Summers to gain a steady momentum, which detracts from its merits, which are seen in its acting, production values and notably adult sensibilities.

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