For 944 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J. Hoberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Mysteries of Lisbon
Lowest review score: 0 A Hole in My Heart
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 74 out of 944
944 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Adaptation's success in engaging the audience in the travails of creating a screenplay is extraordinary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Plenty of moments in Melancholia are painfully funny. Some moments are even painful to watch, but there was never a moment when I thought about the time or my next movie or did not care about the characters or had anything less than complete interest in what was happening on the screen.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    A fierce dance of destruction. Its flame-like, roiling black-and-white inspires trembling and gratitude.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Wong is sensationally expressive and projects a modern, coolly appraising sexuality. Visually eloquent and often dazzling, the movie is no less terrific. Piccadilly is both evidence of silent cinema at its rudely aborted peak and Wong's frustrated potential to have been among its greatest stars.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    A work of unostentatious beauty and uncloying sweetness, at once sophisticated and artless, mysterious and matter-of-fact, cosmic and humble, it asks only a measure of Boonmeevian acceptance: The movie doesn't mean anything-it simply is.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Treeless Mountain is skillfully unsentimental--because of, but also despite, the presence of two irresistible, unself-conscious performers in virtually every scene.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    The movie is as eloquently uninflected and filled with quirks as its star.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Energetic, inventive, swaggering fun, Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds is a consummate Hollywood entertainment--rich in fantasy and blithely amoral.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Leisurely yet streamlined film, brilliantly adapted by British filmmaker Terence Davies from Edith Wharton's most powerful novel.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Terror is existential in this highly intelligent, somewhat sadistic, totally fascinating movie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    The results are extraordinary. As understated as it is, the movie is both deeply absurd and powerfully affecting.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    As straightforward and plot-driven as any movie about life imitating art imitating life could possibly be.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Excavated from the deep '50s, Michelangelo Antonioni's Le amiche (known in English as "The Girlfriends") is an unexpected treasure.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Though he successfully humanizes Hirohito, who is shown happily shedding his divinity, Sokurov doesn't entirely exonerate him. He contrives a shock ending that, as measured as everything else in this engrossing, supremely assured movie, acknowledges one last blood sacrifice on the emperor's altar.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    The filmmaker uncovers a foul, lurid, corrupt, and perversely compelling conspiracy--which is to say, he successfully turns The Night Watch into a Peter Greenaway film.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    A masterpiece of poetic horror and tactful, tactile brutality.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    The Fallen Idol has been overshadowed by the noir comedy, giddy style, and Cold War thematics of Reed and Greene's subsequent sensation "The Third Man," but (in similarly dealing with the nature of betrayal) The Fallen Idol is actually a superior psychological drama.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    This lusty, heartfelt movie has a near Brueghelian visual energy and a humanist passion as contagious as its music.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    It's a measure of Cuarón's directorial chops that Children of Men functions equally well as fantasy and thriller. Like Spielberg's "War of the Worlds" and the Wachowski Brothers' "V for Vendetta" (and more consistently than either), the movie attempts to fuse contemporary life with pulp mythology.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    As mystical as it is gritty, as despairing as it is detached.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Boxing Gym is a companion piece of sorts to "La Danse: The Paris Opera Ballet," Wiseman's previous doc that played Film Forum last fall. It's not simply that boxing and ballet are understood as kindred activities. Boxing Gym is itself a dance movie-which is to say, a highly formalized exercise in choreographed activity.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    This has to be the most richly entertaining movie anyone has ever made on the subject of female genital mutilation.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    It's a baroque and intermittently brilliant brain twister so convoluted that it inevitably deposits the viewer in an alternate universe.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    A movie of cutting humor, near-constant talk, and one show-stopping dance routine.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    An explicit ode to mortality, not without a certain grim humor.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Although dense with incident and motif, the movie has an effortless flow.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    This extravagant family melodrama, one of the highlights of last year's New York Film Festival, runs two and a half hours and never lags, so moment-to-moment enthralling are Desplechin's narrative gambits, as well as his reckless eccentricity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Ultimately, The Woodmans is a haunting study in family dynamics.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    A wondrously perverse movie that not only evokes a lost moment in time but circles around an unrepresentable subject. Mood is the operative word. A love story far more cerebral than it is emotional.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    As bittersweet a brief encounter as any in American movies since Richard Linklater's equally romantic "Before Sunrise."

Top Trailers