For 228 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jay Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Full Metal Jacket
Lowest review score: 0 Coming to America
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 57 out of 228
228 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    La Bamba may in many ways be a catalogue of cliches, but they are cliches that Valens was able to live for his people for the first time, and they are cliches that Luis Valdez has been able to film for his people (for all people) for the first time.
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Francis Ford Coppola's adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel Dracula, is decadent, overpoweringly erotic campiness coupled with soft-core pornography - blood, breasts, buttocks and big teeth. It's daring and those with a taste for the sexily sanguine will find it delightful. But it's not for the prudish. [13 Nov 1992, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    It is an agreeable example of how a picture conceived as "product" need not condescend to the audience it exploits. [11 Apr 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The film is a respectable, claustrophobic and slick piece of work, and cinematographer Nestor Almendros' color strategies - Rembrandt-like light at night, lemony tones during the day, desaturated sepia at Auschwitz - are arty to a fault. [14 Dec 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    In High Hopes, Leigh regularly expresses love for the very people to whom he is putting the boot... As a satire, High Hopes is an esthetic joy. [14 April 1989]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Timeliness aside, it's an electrifying and erotic film-noir thriller in the Hitchcock tradition - James Stewart could have been cast as Tom Farrell - right up to the final five minutes, which feature a surprise ending that is a shock primarily because it makes little logical sense; surprise endings should click satisfyingly into place once the shock has worn off, but this one stirs up questions that refuse to settle. [14 Aug 1987]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Peggy Sue is by no means a masterpiece of movie art, but it is an example of the sort of thoroughly enjoyable middle-brow Hollywood picture - clever, thoughtful, literate - that went missing about the time Peggy Sue got married. [10 Oct 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The Lost Boys mixes comedy and horror with a dexterity that augments each. Dracula and Peter Pan were antipodal products of the same society: bringing them together has resulted in a marriage that would make Bram Stoker snicker and J.M. Barrie bawl. [1 Aug 1987, p.C5]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Silkwood is a friendly, kooky and caring film. [09 Dec 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    F/X
    In the hallowed Hollywood tradition of mindless flash, F/X turns the suspension of disbelief into airy entertainment. [7 Feb 1986, p.D3]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The movie remains an embodiment of Spielberg's commercially cunning brand of clankingly retro filmmaking, despite the wit and charm brought to their Spiel-speak dialogue by the talented young performers, The Goonies is less a movie than an entertainment machine. [7 Jun 1985, p.E1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The people behind Cocoon have taken many of the weariest of the cinematic cliches of the eighties and invested them with hearts and minds; from an unsightly chrysalis, a thing of beauty has been born. [21 June 1985]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The film as a whole, beautifully drawn and gracefully set into balletic motion, teaches a few welcome lessons regarding ecology and racial tolerance. [19 Nov 1988]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    For all its contrivance, it's lively and amusing and occasionally disconcerting in its reproduction of what life was like in the mid-to-late teens.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    It's got thrills and chills and one of the most elegantly conceived monsters in the history of movies.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Buffy The Vampire Slayer should be a mess, but it's not. It's a mini-comic triumph, and although it's technically a teen movie, it's in the tiny genre of sophisticated, darkly funny teen films such as Heathers and Pump Up the Volume. [4 Aug 1992, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    As torpedoes shoot through the seas and depth charges pass by, carrying their whining cargo of destruction, Das Boot brings the presence of death to within a whisper of the eardrum.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    One does not expect to find references to Bertolucci in a action movie distributed by American International, but Mad Max is no ordinary action movie: it's a B-movie classic on the order of Truck Stop Women, and when its director, George Miller, steals from established filmmakers, he steals from the best. [15 April 1980]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Some viewers will decide that Benny & Joon strays too far from the brink; they will find its sentimentality cloying. Other viewers will applaud the classic silent film humour and will emerge with a glow they'll want to show off to their friends. Both camps can agree, however, that Mary Stuart Masterson, Aidan Quinn and Johnny Depp are quite good. [16 Apr 1993]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The cinematic strategies are energetic without being vulgar, the words are plain-spoken, and moony Mel's melancholy is what matinee idols are made of. [18 Jan 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    In My Bodyguard the warfare is entirely internecine, and the movie, for all its shortcomings, is an exceptionally perceptive (and funny) study of the terror that can be visited upon an innocent victim. [23 Aug 1980]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Even when their material is not much more substantial than a punchline overheard in a playground, Cheech and Chong, in their routines together, make being funny look as effortless as Ella Fitzgerald makes singing sound.[23 July 1980]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Realism by nature offends the dogmatic, and Michael Mann, in a writing-directing debut that makes one want to see his next movie instantly, is a devotee of the realistic in factual essentials, if not in esthetics. [27 Mar 1981]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    At two hours and 43 minutes, Eastwood's Bird is a hypnotic, darkly photographed, loosely constructed marvel that avoids every cliche of the self-destructive-celebrity biography, a particularly remarkable achievement in that Parker played out every cliche of the self- destructive-celebrity life. [14 Oct 1988, p. C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Kindergarten Cop is fast, loud and obvious, but there are unexpectedly delicate touches. [21 Dec 1990, p.C10]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    A surprisingly large portion of the picture is given over to a gritty and unexpectedly moving examination of a senseless but understandable feud between two wrongheaded, sincere people making all the wrong moves. [21 Oct 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Alan Parker has directed the film as if he were a sniper: you never know when you're going to get hit next, but from the first moments you know you're being aimed at. The opening, with Hayes taping hash to his chest only to be apprehended at the airport, must have looked like standard stuff in Oliver Stone's script, but on screen it's unadulterated adrenalin, filmed with fast cuts timed in counterpoint to the sound of Hayes' pounding heart. [25 Oct 1978]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    This low-budget horror film, sophisticated far beyond its budget, is the work of John Carpenter, an authentic prodigy whose style recalls both Martin Scorsese and the Brian De Palma of "Carrie," but who has a metaphysical, sophomoric sense of humor both of those directors lack.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Absence of Malice is lively, provocative and intelligent, three qualities in short supply this Christmas. It simplifies, but it rarely distorts, and it doggedly picks at sores journalists would just as soon banish by Band-aid. [19 Dec 1981]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Spielberg hooks us again with state-of-the-art craft, the director taps into powerful myths, both primal and pop, and makes them seem new. He allows grownups to return to childhood, but manages to catch fish in all generational waters.
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

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