For 132 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jay Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Miller's Crossing
Lowest review score: 0 Coming to America
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 78 out of 132
  2. Negative: 34 out of 132
132 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The Two Jakes itself is less tragic than petulant, mired in a self-pitying remembrance of things past. [10 Aug 1990]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Delicatessen is a carniverous sausage - lots of fat, a few meaty bits. [10 Apr 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Dorothy's friends are as weird as her enemies, which is faithful to the original Oz books but turns out not to be a virtue on film, where the eerie has a tendency to remain eerie no matter how often we're told it's not. [22 Jun 1985, p.E3]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The Black Stallion Returns is not a magic monument - it's only a terrific film for kids. [26 Mar 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    If you see Clue only once, and it's hard to imagine seeing it more than once, even for the five different minutes, the "A" is by far the best, featuring as it does (this does not give away the identity of the murderer) a splendidly funny shtick from Madeline Kahn. [13 Dec 1985, p.D5]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    There are lively, compelling scenes, particularly in the first hour - Raimi has an indubitable talent for camp mayhem - but the picture escalates into absurdity and the last half hour, essentially a chase sequence, is marred by suprisingly cheesy special effects. [24 Aug. 1990]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The film is primarily an excuse for Chase to demonstrate that though he may be a movie star he has yet to learn how to create, let alone sustain, a character, and for director Harold (Caddyshack) Ramis and screenwriter John (National Lampoon's Class Reunion) Hughes to demonstrate that some movie stars get the colleagues they deserve. [2 Aug 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    The problem with the taboo-busters is that they feel calculated - in the past, Lynch's creepiness seemed casual and natural - and they take Wild at Heart so high it can't come down; the picture repeatedly jacks itself into frenzy only to crash into lethargy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    American Me is a graphic and honest effort that, unfortunately, becomes a catalogue of other films on similar subjects. Its depiction of prison life is much too slow, too long, too repetitive and too familiar. [13 Mar 1992, p. C3]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    White Nights is too ponderous to have the pizzazz of trash and too dumb to have the insight of art - it's a lumbering behemoth of a film in which the extraordinary talent of its one authentic star, Mikhail Baryshnikov, is exploited in a Cold War cartoon that suggests a musical adaptation of Ayn Rand's anti- Soviet novel, We The Living. [22 Nov 1985]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    When The Big Chill is busy being funny, it's a great comedy, but when it goes for depth, it hits bottom an inch down. [30 Sep 1983, p.E1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    Kubrick certainly doesn't fail small. One could fast forget The Shining as an overreaching, multi-levelled botch were it not for Jack Nicholson. Nicholson, one of the few actors capable of getting the audience to love him no matter what he does, is an ideal vehicle for Kubrick. [14 Jun 1980, p.E1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    The manipulative Star Wars-style score is the only novelty on tap in Silverado, which has a plot too drearily complicated and arid to summarize and an attitude almost unbearable in its dryly smirky assurance that it knows what you want from a Western, which is to say, action that never quits, emotion that's never felt, characters that are never real and situations that are never sensible. [10 Jul 1985, p.S7]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    Most of the time the film is simply stupid; not offensive, just silly. [03 May 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    Air America, starring Mel Gibson's big blue eyes and Robert Downey, Jr.'s big brown biceps, is bland and toothless. [15 Aug 1990]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    I'll personally toast the buns of anybody I hear saying anything good about the movie Broadcast News. Broadcast News is for boobs. It doesn't apply to us. Anyone who thinks otherwise is invited not to think, because thinking is for statues. [16 Dec 1987, p.C5]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    In the end, this musical is not a disgrace - Huston has too much experience to let the thing die. But he cannot summon the magic required to let it live. Watching Annie is like being buried alive in balloons. [21 May 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    There are two movies in Superman III, one a witless and obvious and often cruel comic strip, the other a blithe and subtle and often amusing exercise in middle-brow camp. Not only do the two halves never come together, they are in active opposition. [17 June 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    It's unclear as to how we are supposed to feel about these monologuists, the majority of whom are twentysomething; nothing is how I felt about them, but perhaps I was tired. [27 Sept. 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    To report that Always will make you cry is not esthetically saying much; slicing up onions has the same effect. Leslie Halliwell's one-word summation of the forties version applies to Spielberg's update for the nineties: "icky." [26 Dec. 1989]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Jay Scott
    Highlander's flashy style is the cinematic equivalent of a Las Vegas chorus line: always kicking. Without Lambert, who displays an unexpected comic talent along with intensely photogenic passive-aggressive eyes, and Roxanne Hart, whose knowledgeable portrayal of a New York detective is undercut by the symphony of screams extracted from her toward the end, and Connery, who wears a pearl-drop earring and is supposed to be Spanish but still has the burr and brio of James Bond, Highlander would be little more than an everlasting video; it's not much more than that, as it is. [10 Mar 1986, p.C9]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 25 Jay Scott
    More than merely another bad movie, it's the most depressing development yet in Coppola's career. It's a would-be cash cow bred cynically to excrete money, the arty answer to "Child's Play 2" or "Back to the Future III."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 25 Jay Scott
    Perfectly passable kiddie escapism. It has a thrill or two, and a chill or three, but it has no poetry, little sense of wonder, no resonant subtext (Jungian or otherwise), no art... When it's over, it's gone. Extinct.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 25 Jay Scott
    The performers are powerless to bring life to this moribund courtroom drama...a snoozer.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 Jay Scott
    Wayne's World has been engineered to amuse people who are mirror images of its heroes, but it goes wickedly wrong: It's so dumb it talks down to the stupid.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Jay Scott
    Purple Rain is not a revolution. It's not even a good movie. What it is, is a cosmic letdown. [27 Jul 1984]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Jay Scott
    In The Dead Pool, Dirty Harry is downright dusty. The erstwhile right-wing San Francisco homicide inspector has mellowed so much in the fifth installment of his adventures that he's become the darling of the liberal Bay Area media and he seems almost bored by blowing people away. [13 Jul 1988, p.C7]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Jay Scott
    In Scrooged, a sub-Saturday Night Live re-make parody of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, Ghostbuster Bill Murray busts up two of the festive ghosts (Christmas Past and Future) and mugs more than Mr. Magoo. [24 Nov 1988, p.C19]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Jay Scott
    A shamelessly commercial and determinedly vulgar director, such as Flash Gordon's Mike Hodges, might have made the film work; it might have succeeded on one level instead of failing on many. [13 Dec 1980, p.E7]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)