Jeannette Catsoulis

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For 1,196 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters
Lowest review score: 0 Once Upon a Time in Brooklyn
Score distribution:
1196 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A searing look at the role of American evangelical missionaries in the persecution of gay Africans, Roger Ross Williams’s God Loves Uganda approaches this intersection of faith and politics with some fairness and a good deal of outrage.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Lion Ark, a spunky account of a perilous rescue mission, has a ragtag rhythm that befits the mercurial behavior of its hulking furry stars.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This challenging and mesmerizing documentary captures horror and joy with the same gorgeous dispassion.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like a fresh ripple in the near-stagnant high school movie pool, Chris Nelson’s Date and Switch balances formula with winning performers, genuine humor and a generosity of spirit that this genre too often lacks.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Economical in the extreme — but without appearing cash-poor — this tightly wound thriller proves that minimal resources can sometimes produce more than satisfying results.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cheerfully partial and unapologetically deferential to its subject’s operatic self-promotion, Jodorowsky’s Dune makes you wish that he had scraped together the final $5 million needed, we are told, to realize his dream.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Always arresting and sometimes troubling, Watermark — aside from the odd comment here and there — neither lectures nor argues.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sweet, funny and ultimately rather touching.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This wonderfully weird documentary pinpoints the desire to preserve fleeting glories.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    There’s a stillness to the filmmaking, coupled with Saunder Jurriaans and David Bensi’s truly lovely original score, that lends specific shots... a near-heartbreaking melancholy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Moving and maddening in almost equal measure, Brian Knappenberger’s The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz is a devastating meditation on what can happen when a prescient thinker challenges corporate interests and the power of the state.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This low-budget debut by Joshua Overbay cooks a surprising amount of tension from the barest minimum of ingredients.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Working with grace and patience, Mr. Fernández makes the mundane captivating.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A fascinating profile of the online pornography provider Kink.com.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The music is lovely, and the animation is soft and imaginatively detailed. Patema and Age may not know what’s upside down or right-way up, but their director is never in any doubt.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A singularly focused and avant-garde talent, Ms. Streb bends the messy rush of risk to her indomitable will.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film’s congeniality, however, in no way dulls its humor or the sharpness of its observations.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A blue collar poem threaded with old-timer memories and present-day pain, Braddock America pays bittersweet tribute to a once-thriving Pennsylvania steel town and those who stuck around to bear witness to its decline.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    [A] sneakily compelling documentary.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Rising above a minuscule budget with ladles of charm and a tender poignancy, Little Feet is a quixotic poem to youthful resourcefulness.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Song of the Sea moves delicately but purposefully from pain to contentment and from anger to love. On land and underwater, the siblings’ adventures unfold in hand-drawn, painterly frames of misty pastels, sometimes encircled by cobwebby borders that give them the look of pictures in a locket.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Capturing the poetry of bodies at rest and a landscape frozen in time (filming was done primarily in the Santa Clarita area of California), Chayse Irvin’s exquisite 35-millimeter photography is dreamy and sometimes devastating.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This weird and witty spoof filters the routines of the living through the lens of the long dead.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Balancing its abstract storytelling with commanding visuals (by the gifted cinematographer Ali Olcay Gözkaya), Futuro Beach explores liberation and reinvention, the tug of familiarity versus the allure of the foreign.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Directors Justin Weinstein and Tyler Measom have produced a jaunty, jovial portrait with a surprising sting in its tail.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A frustratingly fragmented yet warmly intimate portrait of an evolving bond that frays but doesn’t sever.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Tiny advances in seduction — like a direct gaze, or the eventual removal of that wig — assume the power of full-on sexual collisions, and Ms. Yaron, with her restlessly darting eyes, easily conveys Meira’s sensual deprivation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Stretched to 80 minutes, the story (by the director Leah Meyerhoff) almost breaks; that it holds together without compromising its simplicity or emotional authenticity only proves that, contrary to the maxim, you don’t need a gun if you’ve got the right girl.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Slow and steady, and with remarkable assuredness, Keith Miller’s Five Star plays mean-streets drama in the lowest of keys.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Blindingly beautiful and meticulously assembled by the award-winning editor Bob Eisenhardt, Meru easily makes you forget that what you are watching is completely bananas.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unspooling with virtually no music and a seriously unsettling sound design, Goodnight Mommy gains significant traction from small moments.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Captured more for poetry than for clarity, the topography of penalties and free kicks can be impossible to follow. But Léo Bittencourt’s photography has flash and flair, and hardscrabble determination on a real-life field of dreams has a narrative all its own.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Johanna Schwartz’s miraculously hopeful documentary, They Will Have to Kill Us First: Malian Music in Exile, delivers a vibrant testimony of resilience under oppression.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Seoul Searching is rude, funny, silly and poignant. Above all, it’s kind; Mr. Lee understands that belonging is a feeling that many of us may never experience.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Impossible to categorize, this stunningly original mix of the macabre and the magical combines comedy, tragedy, fantasy and love story into an utterly singular package that’s beholden to no rules but its own.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Often chaotic but never disorienting, the movie’s spirited set pieces — like a wriggling ribbon of undead clinging doggedly to the last compartment — owe much to Lee Hyung-deok’s wonderfully agile cinematography.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A strange, spiky movie that refuses to beg for our affection, Little Sister, the fifth feature from Zach Clark, molds the classic homecoming drama into a quirky reconciliation between faith and family.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This amiable look at life on the margins gradually accumulates a melancholy that punctures the drollness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfolding with a minimum of dialogue, Francisca’s maturation from watcher to doer would be laughable if performed with less nuance or photographed with less originality.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Gruesome without being gory, The Autopsy of Jane Doe achieves real scares with a minimum of special effects.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Stingingly attuned to the tension between long-term love and last-minute misgivings, Between Us makes a familiar situation feel remarkably fresh.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The setup is commonplace, but the scenery is delicious, the dialogue refreshingly tart and the keen supporting cast frisky or affecting, as the occasion demands.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The two leads are mesmerizing, hurling themselves into their physically demented roles with ferocious commitment.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Playing with memory — the characters’ and our own — allows Mr. Boyle and his cinematographer, Anthony Dod Mantle, to conjure some of the movie’s loveliest, most melancholy images.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie dives into the black arts with methodical restraint and escalating unease.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a movie about large setbacks and small triumphs, and the grit that takes you from one to the other.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This film belongs to its star.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If your sole image of Playboy founder Hugh Hefner is that of a lanky, silk-jammied sybarite strolling the grounds of his mansion with a jiggling blond on either arm, Hugh Hefner: Playboy, Activist and Rebel will knock your socks off.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The trick to enjoying The Town, Ben Affleck's follow-up to his impressive 2007 directing debut, "Gone, Baby, Gone," is to expect nothing but pulpy entertainment.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It's brilliantly silly entertainment whose flaws are glaring only in hindsight; in the moment, you'll have much more fun if you stop looking for holes in the script and join Paul in looking for a way out.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    At its best, The Fighter takes on the chasm between televised boxing and its mostly working-class, aspirational origins with grit and intelligence.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Kid With a Bike feels as vulnerable as Cyril's unformed character. Within its tight 87 minutes, not a lot happens, unless you count the saving of a life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Propriety and recklessness make for uneasy bedfellows in The Deep Blue Sea, a shimmering exploration of romantic obsession and the tension between fitting in and flying free.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Even were it not so delightful, Damsels in Distress, set at a fictional upper-crust college, would deserve a watch for its dialogue alone.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfolding in somber tones and among hard surfaces, Arbitrage has the slickness of new bank notes and the confidence of expensive tailoring.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sleep Tight is a nifty little thriller that dances on the boundary between plausible and preposterous.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Written and directed by David Riker, who built his 1998 drama "La Ciudad" around immigrants in New York City, The Girl is stingy with backstory but rich with visual clues.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though the film eventually caves to sentiment and stereotype, its alert performances and muted rhythms offer much to enjoy in the interim.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Using de Chabannes as the film's conscience and moral fulcrum, Tavernier - just as he did in his 1996 film "Captain Conan" - exposes the shame of a meaningless war and the psychological damage borne by those fighting it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Not until the film's surprisingly touching finale do we learn the source of that friction, in a delicately handled sequence that retroactively floods the story with satisfying context.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Richly photographed by Rob Hardy (who gave Red Riding: 1974 its almost surreal bleakness), this meticulously researched story (Marston spent a month interviewing families trapped in these vendettas) reveals a culture dominated by male pride and patriarchal selfishness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Jeannette Catsoulis
    I went to school in Aberdeen and know the region well. It's a place of unforgiving winds and magnificent sunsets, harsh farmland and deserted beaches. The people are hardy, hardworking and fiercely self-sufficient, asking little of their government except the will to do the right thing. They weren't Trumped; they were betrayed.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Looper, a cocky sci-fi tale with more brass than substance, is rife with these "Say what?" moments.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Disconnect is naturally gripping. Using unforgiving closeups, Rubin pokes into unexpected corners— not least the different ways in which men and women respond to calamity — and never forces his story's social-media scares to improbable heights.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though occasionally inflammatory -- one interviewee talks about being "slingshotted into slavery" -- American Blackout isn’t a conspiracy rant. It's a methodical compilation of questions and irregularities that deserves a wider audience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A clear-eyed and utterly ruthless dissection of the battle for Ohio in the months leading up to the 2004 presidential election.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite its immersion in tragedy and decline, So Much So Fast is leavened by unexpected humor.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A novel teenage comedy with an astute understanding of adolescent sexual confusion and the nebulous nature of desire, Zerophilia suggests an elastic view of gender that's alternately gleeful and terrifying.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film’s guileless, heartfelt style veers perilously close to corniness at times, but the superb cast dares you to mock.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Keir Moreano’s muted yet moving record of his father's experience as a volunteer doctor in Vietnam, documents a journey that's substantially more philosophical than medical.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A perceptive and beautifully acted drama.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Julian P. Hobbs directs by getting out of the way of his star's soulful eyes and considerable talent, allowing Mr. Mays to feed on the tension between the rationality of his character's courtroom argument and the utter lunacy of his beliefs.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    One of those rare ensemble dramas whose actors work toward common goals rather than individual awards, the movie resolves its creeping escalation of poor judgment and reprehensible behavior with surprising emotional force.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An unusually perceptive scrutiny of absence and emptiness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Thought-provoking rather than deeply philosophical, Ever Since the World Ended features many engaging performances and several outstanding ones.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A heartbreaking and meticulous documentary about life inside a blue-jeans factory in China.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like most films of this type, Room 314 demands a great deal from its performers, not all of whom withstand the intense scrutiny. Fortunately, the action is bookended by four of the best.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Starter for Ten offsets its rite-of-passage clichés with relaxed performances and an extremely likable lead.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Border Post is notable for representing all of Yugoslavia's former member republics among its producers and for a tone that juggles humor and harshness without sacrificing either.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A slick and absorbing drama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Stylistically stunning and completely nuts, Ping Pong is nevertheless perceptive about male social hierarchies and the benefits of knowing your place.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A fascinating glimpse of a dreamer and a music culture that has always depended on dreams.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A lively romp through terrain less traveled than you might think.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An enigmatic and utterly compelling story of incinerated art, unbridled egos and exotic plants.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The irritations and tedium of high school life are staged with refreshing simplicity, while the performers interact with an age-appropriate naturalness the American teenage movie rarely achieves.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An adamantly linear, myth-busting stride through a prodigiously talented life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Memories of Tomorrow finally understands that the real victim of this terrible affliction is the partner left behind.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Bug
    The escalating hysteria and grisly set pieces of Bug may strain credulity, but Ms. Judd has never been more believable as a woman condemned to attract the wrong kind of man.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The cannibals, coconuts and landlocked locations have been replaced by the high-seas high jinks that made the first film so enjoyable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie is most effective in its early scenes of prickly menace, and while the Dolphin is no Overlook (the haunted hotel in "The Shining"), its old-world creepiness is exactly right.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Vividly impressionistic and delightfully curious.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An effervescent comedy coasting on the charisma of its stars.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like Douglas Sirk without the throw pillows, Sunflower is a shamelessly old-fashioned melodrama performed with such sincerity that resistance is futile.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Fox may be a romantic, but he understands that love is rarely all you need.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though playing at times like an extended sitcom, Ira & Abby radiates a breathless charm, due in no small part to Ms. Westfeldt’s sharp dialogue and engagingly unmannered performance.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    More than anything, a Tyler Perry movie is an interactive experience, and Why Did I Get Married? is no exception. At the screening I attended, it was often difficult to hear the dialogue between bouts of enthusiastic applause and shouts of “You go, girl!”
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Inert yet strangely compelling film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Part tribute, part musical mystery, ’Tis Autumn: The Search for Jackie Paris shines an overdue spotlight on a great who got away.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Presenting neither an argument for medication nor its rejection, Billy the Kid is a deceptively simple portrait of a shockingly self-aware and articulate young man.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    CJ7
    A devilishly entertaining curveball thrown at unsuspecting family audiences.

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