Jeannette Catsoulis

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For 1,258 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Let It Fall: L.A. 1982-1992
Lowest review score: 0 Awakened
Score distribution:
1258 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The accumulation of spot-on performances and long-familiar faces, small-town routines and dusty-worn locations, finally coalesces into a picture that’s greater than the sum of its oft-clichéd parts.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though disappointment and loneliness guide its conversations, the movie isn’t bleak; it’s a touching and tender commentary on the need to be seen and the desire to be heard.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With a likable cast and a wholesome message about the true meaning of success, The Tiger Hunter might balk at the harsher details of immigrant life, but it has a generosity of spirit that lifts everyone up.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unlike their spring 2018 fashion collection, Kate and Laura Mulleavy’s first foray into moviemaking, “Woodshock,” is depressingly dull and terminally inarticulate.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    In a movie as happy to resurrect characters as rub them out, nothing is of consequence, and the glibness grows numbing.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 10 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The soullessness of the enterprise is staggering. Making clichéd, cynical gestures toward romance, Mr. Harris (whose last feature was almost a decade ago) tortured me for a full 96 minutes.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Equal parts disturbing and humorous, informative and bizarre, Rat Film is a brilliantly imaginative and formally experimental essay on how Baltimore has dealt with its rat problem and manipulated its black population.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The performances of the young actors who play them (actual twins, though not conjoined) are the real miracles here, each one creating a distinct personality.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A hodgepodge of pseudoscientific twaddle and variously shifty murder suspects, Rememory satisfies neither as science fiction nor as psychological drama.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Marrying fact and fiction, Jane Goldman’s seamy screenplay is wildly overstuffed; but the director, Juan Carlos Medina, gives the music hall scenes a rowdy authenticity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The intimacy of the film’s images and the surprising candor of its participants are disarming: Whatever your initial response, be prepared to re-evaluate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like the teenage girls who monopolize its attention, Kill Me Please is moody, lovely, preening and libidinous.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A movie that has neither a coherent point nor an authentic character.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With its bleak, yearning tone and defiantly cloudy color palette, “England Is Mine” has a pleasingly granular feel for its era and location. But its imagining of Morrissey as a self-pitying narcissist, a curiously passive intellectual who can’t get out of his own way, soaks the movie in a wearying inertia.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Perhaps stifled by the cultural and commercial clout of its source material (a multimedia juggernaut of books, movies, television shows and a stage musical), Death Note feels rushed and constricted.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sometimes dreamy but mostly dissatisfying, “Walk With Me” offers no clarity for the curious. We can enjoy the meditative mood, but understanding its underpinnings would require more than this idyll of silence and stillness provides.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    “Sidemen” is about more than just legacy. Blessed with extensive interviews with their buoyant subjects (all three of whom died in 2011 within months of one another), Mr. Rosenbaum and his producer Jasin Cadic shape a narrative of professional insecurity and personal resilience.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This quirky, obsessive documentary is about so much more than broken keys and busted type wheels. It’s really about how we create art.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Allan Loeb’s script is glib and grating.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though the spaces between the funny voices are filled with verdant hillsides and vanilla beaches that stretch the length of the frame, there’s an occasional sour edge to the comedic sparring.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As with last year’s “Lights Out,” [Sandberg] proves a master of the flash-scare, a nifty choreographer of precipitous timing and striptease visuals. But he’s also adroit with more leisurely horrors.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The songs are unmemorable and the choreography less than twinkle-toed, but the lyrics are a delight.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The splatter is deployed cautiously and sometimes wittily, the story moving briskly from wishes granted to costs exacted with the help of familiar faces (including a warm Sherilyn Fenn as Clare’s surrogate mother) and a sympathetic lead.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Little Hours is saved from ignominy by two brief standout performances.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With a little more shading and originality, 13 Minutes might have pushed beyond its familiar Nazi tropes to shape something more immediate and infinitely more potent: an ominous portrait of radicalization.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The look is rough, the emotions always hovering near the surface. Yet, buoyed by Mr. Sharif’s cheery personality, these can sometimes be defiantly upbeat.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Its arguments range wide without going deep, but its factoids about the medical benefits of hanging out in a forest — and the cognitive costs of a noisy school or hospital — are fascinating and persuasive.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This chilly tale of violent secrets and unvoiced misery relies heavily on the skill of actors who seem to know that one false move could tip the whole enterprise into comedy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    In the lulls between bouts of yammering, however, the director, Johannes Roberts, concentrates on building a solid atmosphere of desperation.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The plot, unlike its execution, is not terrible.

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