Jessica Kiang
Select another critic »
For 147 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jessica Kiang's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Cemetery of Splendor
Lowest review score: 25 Beauty and the Beast
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 8 out of 147
147 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    Presenting a terrifying view of a hidden holocaust and a moral apocalypse in which the most basic humanities have become twisted beyond recognition, The Act of Killing is a towering achievement in filmmaking, documentary or otherwise.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    Blue is the Warmest Color is a masterpiece of human warmth, empathy and generosity, because in a mere three hours, it gives you a whole new life to have lived.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    With Foxcatcher, [Miller] has outdone himself, turning his uniquely meticulous eye to a tiny story in a totally rarefied, specific environment and through whatever alchemy he has perfected, created something so universal and resonant that it feels epic, sprawling, almost ancient in its mythic overtones. Foxcatcher is an enormous film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    There are ups and downs and soapish highs and lows, but what stops this from ever becoming a telenovela is the riveting wonder of the performances and the sheer brio of the filmmaking.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    perhaps the greatest achievement is in how brilliantly the film balances the trademark Dardennes social conscience with a conceit that plays out almost like a ticking-clock thriller, as well as being a deeply felt character study.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    The actions and events are naked to our eyes, not couched in reasons and justifications, not softened by explanations, by words.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    It’s borderline miraculous.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    The film does not stab as deeply in laying bare the schizoid moral hypocrisy of the perpetrators of the Indonesian genocide as its peerless predecessor, but instead offers an extraordinarily poignant, desperately upsetting meditation on the legacy of those killings, and on the bravery required to seek any kind of truth about them.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    If it presents an accurate picture of this reality, then it feels like it’s a reality that is unstable, so far cut off from the mainstream of life that it has begun to fray into the surreal and the magic at the edges.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    A movie so simple, so elegant, and yet so devouringly empathetic that you might not notice its full magic until a few hours later.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    Made of crystal and suppressed tears, shot eternally through windows and mirrors and half-closed doors, Todd Haynes' Carol is a love story that starts at a trickle, swells gradually to a torrent, and finally bursts the banks of your heart. A beautiful film in every way, immaculately made, and featuring two pristine actresses glowing across rooms and tousled bedclothes at each other like beacons of tentative, unspoken hope.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    It is so lived-in and authentic in its real-world detail, and so enigmatic and mysterious in its diversions and sidelong glances, that it's difficult not to see it as overridingly personal, not just to the director but to the viewer. It's a true act of the most optimistic communication and communion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    On both a political and a personal level, the film is pessimistic, yes, but it feels truthful, and never lapses into easy cynicism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    With pitch-perfect performances across the board, and boasting crisp photography and editing, the film never ceases to twist, turn and surprise, taking wicked joy in constantly switching us back on ourselves and our expectations of the characters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    For anyone with even a halfway developed sense of justice The Hunt may prove stressful, frustrating, even enraging, but it’s also an unbelievably effective watch, that, if nothing else signals an undeniable return to form for Vinterberg, and yet another blistering performance from Mikkelsen. See it, if only for the debates it will cause afterward.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    Gloria is an endlessly watchable creation—a wonderful example of an actress melting into a role, and a co-writer/director with almost superhuman levels of sensitivity and empathy for his characters.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    Director Pavich, his first time at bat, has crafted an unalloyed pleasure of a documentary, especially for those of us who care about "Dune," about sci-fi, and about the value and power of creative passion.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    This is a peculiarly beautiful film, with lingering sustain and the kind of hard-won optimism that feels truthful as well as hopeful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    The supporting cast all do excellent work too, but this is Eric’s story, and so it’s O’Connell’s film. His performance is a revelation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    Overall a triumphantly idiosyncratic film with smarts and visceral impact in equal measure.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    Girlhood is a fascinatingly layered, textured film that manages to be both a lament for sweetness lost and a celebration of wisdom and identity gained, often at the very same moment.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    Force Majeure is a brutally smart and original film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    99 Homes is by no means a perfect film, but it can achieve something more precious, and rarer than glossy perfection: it can take you by the shoulders and shake the apathy and complacency away.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    "Pigeon" is a near-perfect cap to a near-perfect trilogy, a cavalcade of oddness, humor, banality and even horror.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    Without overly romanticizing it or suggesting that, ultimately, it is anything more than a business built around the talents of some very singular men, Sunada's film becomes a love letter of a most unusual kind, because it is addressed to a place that is unremarkable in every way except for the spirit that flowed through it.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    The current of informed anger, directed at those who stand by while injustice and bigotry flourish, is unmistakable and turns the whole film into a kind of clever folk fable-cum-protest song.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    '71
    ‘71 is more than just a performance showcase, delivering a gripping, at times almost unbearably tense, incredibly involving anti-war statement, made the stronger for being set against the less cinematically familiar backdrop of Belfast in the year 1971.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    Aided by intensely committed performances from a uniformly brilliant cast, all fielding Scottish accents, Kurzel's genius is to be able to find clean lines of dramatic connection and motivation within the existing text and then to interpret those imaginatively, without becoming simplistic and without compromise.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    It may be a hugely tacky, cartoony balloon pit of a film, but when every single element is dialled up to eleven and you can't go thirty seconds without another three-way face-off between OTT, OMG and WTF, it starts to achieve a maximalist artistry that almost feels avant-garde. At least that's my story and I'm sticking to it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    It isn't really about the people as much as about the pictures, and for once that does not seem to be a trade off that compromises the power of the resulting film at all.

Top Trailers