John Bleasdale
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For 50 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Bleasdale's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Leviathan
Lowest review score: 20 Grace of Monaco
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 50
  2. Negative: 2 out of 50
50 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 John Bleasdale
    Although a couple of narrative twists late on threaten to drum us into melodrama, Chazelle never misses a beat and the film builds to a cathartic crescendo.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 John Bleasdale
    Carell, in a rare but not unique departure into drama, proves himself as accomplished at tragedy as he is at comedy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 John Bleasdale
    Dolan is a director who thinks hard about the possibilities of cinema and explores them with verve and ingenuity, but it is in his latest film that everything has come together.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 John Bleasdale
    Zvyagintsev's pessimism is leavened both by his comedy and his sense of beauty. Mikhail Krichman's cinematography captures the sublime grandeur of the landscape against which the nasty, brutish and short lives are played out.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 John Bleasdale
    Birdman is a rich, startlingly clever and multi-layered collage, with Iñárritu creating a meta-universe of mirrors and performances upon performances.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 John Bleasdale
    Oppenheimer's first film maintained a passive detachment, allowing the killers to re-enact their own atrocities and metaphorically hang themselves with their own words. The Look of Silence takes a far harder line, probing the killers more deeply and confronting them in an attempt to shake some sense of remorse out of them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 John Bleasdale
    The film is heartfelt and sincere in its concern to understand conflict and the plight of good men when they're forced to make impossible choices.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    For most post-apocalyptic films, the nightmare is really a disguised fantasy. In Michôd's excellent The Rover, the nightmare is real.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    With a richness of characterisation usually reserved for hefty novels, each shot in Winter Sleep glows like a symbol, whilst each digression is almost a short story in itself.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    The Wonders is a complex and nuanced illustration of a family trying to live by their own standards - whilst only partly failing. Rohrwacher's vision is tactful and restrained, with so much we don't ever know. The characters' histories are there to be guessed rather than spelled out.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    In arguably a career-topping performance, Timothy Spall plays the cantankerous painter as a complex, grunting, snarling and utterly single-minded creature.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    A brutal, crackling and savage Hollywood satire Maps to the Stars knows exactly where it's going, carefully breaking every rule in the book. After carefully constructing his crystal kingdom, Cronenberg launches his stones with dark, mischievous joy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    With The Homesman, Jones has produced an original and cantankerously offbeat western which becomes increasingly beguiling as the road stretches on.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    A fluid, dreamlike tone poem of mothers and fathers, death and continuance.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    Sissako's film is at turns funny, poetic and deeply moving.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    [Bahrani's] created a complex and thoughtful political drama with the speed and tension of a good thriller.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    It may be stuck in the past, with its hoary clichés about the call girl with the heart of gold and the incurable romantic, but the whole thing fizzes with such joie de vivre that the anachronisms only add to its overwhelming charm.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    The result is a beautifully entertaining film. It is witty and the scenes between Gerwig and Pacino fizz alternately with flirtation, humour and occasionally rage.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    With The Postman's White Nights, Konchalovsky offers up an intimate and moving pastoral.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    Petzold's Phoenix is a high-concept premise executed as a heart-wrenching character piece.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    Andersson packs his film with thought-provoking deadpan humour.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    Polsky keeps Red Army driving forward and the result is a film as fast-paced and bloody-minded as the sport it celebrates.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 John Bleasdale
    It's a feel good movie but also a refreshing blast from the past, expressing a nostalgia for a time when political quietism and apathy had not won the day and a Billy Bragg song made more than historical sense.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 60 John Bleasdale
    Two Days, One Night is well made, and Cotillard and the rest of the cast give assured performances, but its optimism is desperate. By no means the Dardennes' best work, one wonders if they shouldn't perhaps stray outside of their comfort zone.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 John Bleasdale
    As we pass from one story to another the relentless savagery does get a bit grinding. In addition, at two hours in length, Szifron's film is perhaps one skit too long. Regardless, Wild Tales is an inventive, occasionally hysterical ride.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 John Bleasdale
    The trajectory of success and excess followed by last act redemption is familiar to the point of parody, and the ploys with time come over as gimmicky attempt to inject an element of surprise into the otherwise predictable narrative.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 John Bleasdale
    Both actresses are excellent, with Binoche given more to do and she flips between attempting to get into the skin of her character and back to her normal self. Stewart, on the other hand, has an easy naturalism as she moves from devotion to rebellion without ever being able to fully express herself.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 John Bleasdale
    This is the kind of oddball midnight movie that could easily gain a cult following and there are delights to be had in the midst.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 John Bleasdale
    As you'd expect from an actor-director of Amalric's pedigree, the performances are brilliant throughout and Mathieu himself has a wonderful eye for the telling tick and/or the revealing gesture.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 John Bleasdale
    Party Girl may tread familiar ground but Theis-Litzemburger is utterly convincing as the self-absorbed, beguilingly unaware lead.