For 399 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John DeFore's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Before Midnight
Lowest review score: 10 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 31 out of 399
399 movie reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    You ought to have to be an unusually interesting person, or at least be capable of presenting your commonplace tribulations in an interesting light, before you can ask moviegoers to spend fifteen bucks to watch you onscreen. Nina Davenport's First Comes Love doesn't buy into this rule.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Cartoonish hyperbole aside, the investigation does have its high points.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Though it lacks the specific argumentative point of view that might have carried it into the mainstream, its sympathetic approach to subjects offers a compelling human perspective on questions that get too little attention in debates about health care.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Alan Rickman's lead performance highlights a sincere but insubstantial rock pic.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Handsome and weighty-feeling but less substantial than it seems.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Liz Marshall's Ghosts in Our Machine trades didacticism for first-person atmospherics.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    An art film whose seductive qualities don't entirely erase the suspicion that its weirder elements might be empty affectation.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Despite a premise with broad appeal and a script boasting plenty of laughs among its misfires, the high school fable falters.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    A great many of these individual scenes are funny... But the film fails to do what those rare, immortal rom-coms get right: take all its individually pleasing ingredients and make a satisfying movie out of them.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Amusing but not as funny or suspenseful as it could be.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Less exploitative and a bit smarter than its seedy adult-film setting would suggest, the shoestring-budgeted film is nevertheless a niche outing that will rely on a stunty premise to attract voyeurs to its debut this Valentine's Day.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Unfocused, overly long documentary raises provocative questions.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Formulaic and often hard to swallow, the picture offers little beyond the familiar pleasures of Duvall's old-coot mode.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Though its even-tempered account may be more thorough than print and TV coverage at the time, the doc doesn't offer anything dramatic enough to draw many eyeballs at this late date.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Unfocussed editing and Mark Rivett's unimaginative score contribute to a lightweight feel that is best suited to TV viewing.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    The film offers some diverting background on the man.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Less an introduction to the green-burial movement than a portrait of one man who embraced it after being diagnosed with a terminal illness, A Will for the Woods is more sentimental than journalistic.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    An appealing cast and well-executed mood of foreboding would seem to hold some promise commercially, but the script grows silly in the third act, letting the picture down.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    Sporadically funny though less effective at selling its melancholy undercurrents.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    The disappointingly generic film, which strands a father and son on Earth a thousand years after a planet-wide evacuation, will leave genre audiences pining for the more Terra-centric conceits of "Oblivion," not to mention countless other future-set films that find novelty in making familiar surroundings threatening.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    Director David Mackenzie's film about two rival band members handcuffed to each other takes too long to find its footing.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    A damning account of institutional dysfunction whose ability to stoke indignation is undercut by its filmmakers' misguided comic antics.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    Its low-rent cast and unappealing key art won't help at the box office, but viewers who stumble across it on cable may be pleasantly, if mildly, surprised.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    A novel cultural focus, highlighting Guyanese citizens of Indian ancestry, isn't enough to sustain interest in the lifeless film, which will attract few outside the Indo-Guyanese community.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    Sadly, this film's POV conceit -- in which all scenes are shot by the characters, whether they have a plausible reason to hold the camera up or not -- quickly becomes as grating as Kelly herself.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    An amusing premise yields few yuks.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    Pretty, occasionally witty and not believable for a moment, Sophie Lellouche's Paris-Manhattan is suffused with fannish love for Woody Allen's films but hardly lives up to their legacy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    The Story of Luke suffers all the flaws associated with disability films and more. Familiar faces in the cast may attract notice in niche bookings, but no one involved will benefit from the exposure.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    The film will attract the attention of a public that's increasingly educated about gourmet matters, but leave the most serious viewers unsatisfied. Fatally for a film of this sort, it doesn't leave the viewer wanting a drink.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    Familiar faces in supporting roles don't do much for the commercial prospects of this modest film, which feels like a made-for-TV version of the prototypical Sundance-aspiring quest for identity.