Jonathan Rosenbaum

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For 1,549 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 2001: A Space Odyssey
Lowest review score: 0 The Ladies Man
Score distribution:
1549 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The whole thing's pretty cute and breezy, but don't expect logic or coherence.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Directors Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe (Lost in La Mancha) are too preoccupied with hip cleverness to have much else on their minds, and the music is so-so.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Marsh and cowriter Milo Addica (Monster's Ball) strive for gothic tragedy as they unbuckle the Bible Belt, but despite some credible performances (Hurt is especially interesting) the effort feels willful.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Marion Cotillard tears up all the available scenery in this overblown, achronological biopic of French pop singer Edith Piaf.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A few laughs and a lot of hyperbolic shtick make this a little better than formulaic before the standard-issue resolution.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This intermittently effective UK horror thriller carefully establishes the psychological relationships among the women, then squanders this calibrated and generally plausible setup with a series of crude, implausible, and scattershot horror effects.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film is watchable as well as informative...But I wish I had a better notion of what story he's trying to tell.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Alan Rudolph's 1994 feature about writer Dorothy Parker and the famous Algonquin wits she hung out with in the 20s certainly has its pleasures, but someone should tell Rudolph that, for all his skill and charm, period movies aren't really his forte.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The involved backstory and Hartley's own generic music both prove burdensome; the main attraction is the cast's amusing way of handling Hartley's mannerist dialogue and conceits.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This exercise in mainstream masochism, macho posturing, and designer-grunge fascism is borderline ridiculous. But it also happens to be David Fincher's richest movie.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you're looking for a simple-minded farce with campy overtones, this 2008 feature might be your dish.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I suspect an account of all the complex business transactions would be more fun than anything in the movie, where you can't see a blue sky that isn't made up to resemble the Dreamworks logo.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Predictably adolescent and smarmy, with the mix of sentimentality and cynical flippancy that's becoming Steven Soderbergh's specialty (even when he's pretending to make art films), this is chewing gum for the eyes and ears, and not bad as such.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite the title, this is less a soccer documentary than a corporate hagiography along the lines of "The Last Mogul" or "The Kid Stays in the Picture"; its real hero isn't Cosmos star Pele (who wisely declined to be interviewed), but Steve Ross, CEO of Warner Communications, which owned the team.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For me, part of the fun of Snake Eyes is the genuine satisfaction of seeing Brian De Palma finally arriving at his own level.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite some sentimentality and occasional directorial missteps, this is a respectable piece of work--evocative, very funny in spots, and obviously keenly felt. With Francis Capra, Taral Hicks, and Katherine Narducci.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Documentary filmmaker Chuck Workman has a slick and entertaining way of stitching together old footage and practically no analytical or historical insight at all.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The couple's parents have a bit more personality than the other characters, but on the whole this is strictly by the numbers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Each set piece is effectively executed, but the characters and their motivations become progressively dimmer and more confused.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Whimsical fantasy tends to work best when its premise is used sparingly, but in this case the fantasy element takes over the story, becoming mechanical and often confused.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The characters are instantly reversible--the bratty kid turns out to be a sweetie pie, the mother just needs to be told off. Only Giamatti, as the cliched businessman husband, is irredeemable.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though director Ulu Grosbard is as good as he usually is with most of the actors, the story problems tend to stump him too.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Dumont is much more confident when he sticks to the title town and the young woman the men left behind; his habit of alternating close shots with extreme long shots and his singularly unsentimental way of showing sex are as distinctive as ever.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An unholy mess that becomes steadily more incoherent -- morally, dramatically, and conceptually.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The sheer oddness of the New York world constructed for this film--where cops and crooks are literally interchangeable, and Oldman and Danny Aiello are stranded in roles that pick over the leavings of earlier parts--ultimately seems at once too deranged and too mechanical.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Minor grisly fun, but don't expect the movie to linger when it's over.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    While the filmmakers manage to keep things interesting (sexy, kinky, and ambiguous) much of the time, the self-conscious piety that Frears lavishes on this material places it in an uncertain netherworld that prevents it from ever becoming fully convincing, even as a stylistic exercise.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Infamous has dramaturgical strengths, whether or not it gets the facts right. Jones's performance as Capote tends to be delivered in a monotone, yet thanks to Craig all of their scenes together are potently realized.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Death of a President wants to function as a mindless thriller that eventually makes us think -- and only after the film is over question the form that encouraged us to be mindless. These are incompatible agendas, and in the end neither is fully successful.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Doesn't reflect anyone's love or hatred for anything, just a lot of anxiety about test marketing, which means it takes a nosedive when it goes shopping for an ending.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    By the time [James Ivory and Ruth Prawer Jhabvala] get around to articulating a story, the inhibitions imposed by their "good taste" begin to seem more like gutlessness, and what initially promises to be an exposure of American liberal doublethink about slavery winds up as a querulous wimp out on a subject that the underrated "Mandingo" is better equipped to deal with.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Murphy takes on a softer edge than usual this time: the plot recalls a Jeanette MacDonald operetta of the Depression, the mythical African country looks like a Beverly Hills fever dream, and, true to Murphy's idealized black middle-class view of things, everybody gets what he wants without much fuss or sacrifice, and virtually the only poor people in evidence are white.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Kevin Jordan (Smiling Fish and Goat on Fire), a protege of Martin Scorsese, wrote and directed this dull 2005 autobiographical feature; it feels real, but solid performances fail to enliven the characters.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For my money, what keeps it bearable is mainly the mugging of the older folks -- not just Jack Black, who steals the show in a part seemingly inspired by John Belushi, but Catherine O'Hara, John Lithgow, and cameos by Chevy Chase, Lily Tomlin, and Kevin Kline.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    More witty than laugh-out-loud funny.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not very believable, even in relation to its own premises, but if you were charmed by "Somewhere in Time" and/or Jack Finney's novel "Time and Again," this might charm you as well.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Baseball fans might find this marginally absorbing; for anyone else it's as conscientious and stylistically pedestrian as director John Sayles's other films, and a mite overlong to boot.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I'm not sure how much has been gained in the updating.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's ultimately hamstrung by storytelling that seems both underdeveloped and overdetermined.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This sprawling and ambitious three-part Canadian film traces the spread of AIDS on three continents, but it gets off to a confusing start… By the time the movie returned to Africa, it had lost me despite its talented cast and its noble intentions.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It did give me plenty of jolts and surprises.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The Spielbergian attempt at sweetness--heralded by references in Danny Elfman's score to the Nutcracker Suite--never fully convinces.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Hampered by the kind of overacting that the cast seems to enjoy more than the audience.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This highly uneven comedy by writer-director Adam Brooks might be easier to take if it were less infatuated with its own cuteness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An irrefutable triumph of engineering, and it entertained and intrigued me through two separate viewings...though as a view of the human condition it's astonishingly and depressingly meager.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie does have a certain amount of star power and occasional bursts of inventive mise en scene, which do a good job of diverting us so we don't realize that not much else is going on.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ridiculous but occasionally fun.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A Disney musical with an undistinguished score (Alan Menken and Jack Feldman), fair to middling choreography (Kenny Ortega and Peggy Holmes), and clunky direction (Ortega) that still manages to be entertaining in spots because of its story.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Pretty enjoyable as a piece of campy sleaze--especially for the first half hour, before the storytelling starts to dawdle.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite (or maybe because of) his obligatory nods to Hitchcock, this is slick and entertaining enough to work quite effectively as thriller porn, even with two contradictory denouements to its mystery (take your pick--or rather, your ice pick).
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie does a pretty good job with period ambience. But it's a long haul waiting for the hero to keel over.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This film sounds better than it plays; there are too many echoes of "Alphaville" and of the dreamy drift of "Blade Runner." But the style of the opening and closing credits is pretty spiffy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Brewer knows how to guide his leads through this improbable story, and he kept me interested in spite of everything.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A watchable but not very memorable comedy-drama.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not a movie that needs to exist, but it passes the time, and at least Hopkins manages to look like Picasso at odd moments.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Hurt's character is so inert and unemotional that some spectators may find it difficult to stay interested in him.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Slight but savory.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Originality and even a certain amount of obscurity are more appealing than formula. This doesn't work, but I was never bored.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Reminded me most of Jean Genet's "Un chant d'amour," with bondage and latex replacing incarceration and cigarettes. This is not to say that it's equally good or poetic, but the eroticizing of a whole universe is no less apparent.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A collection of shots and characters designed to circle the globe rather than to say anything much about either the filmmakers or the audience, a triumph of multinational capital at work rather than of people or ideas.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This doesn't exactly set the world on fire, but I was charmed by its old-fashioned storytelling, which is refreshingly free of archness, self-consciousness, or "Kill Bill"-style wisecracks.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Too full of its own heavy breathing to work as the primordial storytelling it's aiming for--a so-so adventure story is closer to the mark.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's hard to think of a deadlier shotgun marriage than Jacques Tourneur's poetry of absence and Spielbergian uplift, but Shyamalan has patented the combo, adding pretentious camera movements that are peculiarly his own--even the jokes are pretty solemn.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An episodic thriller that certainly has its moments, but eventually peters out into dull formula standbys; Eastwood's Harry seems weary of his own sarcastic witticisms, and the ones here won't make anybody's day.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Nobody seems to know quite what he's doing in this opulent but fairly empty period fashion show, apart from campy overactors like Christopher Walken and Jonathan Pryce who appear eager to fill the voids left by their colleagues.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It opens promisingly, with a fine sense of the disorientation of a monolingual tourist abroad and in trouble. But instead of things building from there, the energy gradually dissipates, and by the time the mystery is solved, it's difficult to care very much.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    One reason why it disappoints is that it comes across as more the work of screenwriter Laura Jones ("An Angel at My Table," "The Portrait of a Lady," "A Thousand Acres"), who's lately been specializing in high-minded literary adaptations, than of Armstrong, who tends to do better and more nuanced work with more intimate and domestic material (e.g., "The Last Days of Chez Nous," "Little Women").
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The new version has its share of disturbing moments, but writer James Gunn and director Zack Snyder have stripped away the social satire of the original and put little in its place.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not so much ill conceived and misdirected as unconceived and undirected, this is folly on a grand scale.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Freeman's God is a mix of Old and New Testament, with a dash of both sexism and sitcom; Carell's Noah is a political fool, but that only proves he's honest and sincere. This is idiotic, but it's so good-natured I didn't mind.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The stylistic discontinuities and pile-driver excesses can be off-putting for an outsider like me, but for fans this may well be part of the appeal.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Alternately mawkish and strident, with lots of fades to white and dog reaction shots, this can be recommended only for its good intentions.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In spirit, if not in letter, it often resembles a gritty Warners crime movie of the 30s, and it held my interest in spite of its excesses.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This exudes trendiness at regular intervals, and otherwise manages to be reasonably charming about Manhattan's melting pot culture, but my general response was still "Wake me when it's over."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Disappointingly conventional though well-made...An OK teen movie, but not a whole lot more.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The bursts of sex and violence that earned this picture an NC-17 rating offer only temporary respite from the encroaching dullness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In short, it's amusing only if you agree not to think very much about it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Clint Eastwood resurrects the star system, the Hollywood love story, and middle-aged romance, but despite all his craft and sincerity, he and screenwriter Richard LaGravenese can't quite turn Robert James Waller's cardboard best-seller into flesh and bone.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Thanks to the performers (including Andie MacDowell and John Turturro), this has a certain amount of charm and warmth, but the period ambience feels both remote and uncertain.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Working with a shapeless script, directors Anthony and Joe Russo (Welcome to Collinwood) can't figure out what they're making. They lunge in several directions, but fail to get around the central problem: most of their actors have little flair for comedy.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I'm far from being a fan of the sport, but the boxing sequences held me and the overall atmosphere appears reasonably authentic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It seems more like an illustration of his (Kaufman) script than a full-fledged movie, proving how much he needs a Spike Jonze or a Michel Gondry to realize his surrealistic conceits.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Brooks has an uncanny talent for making us feel insightful.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    On its own modest terms, this romp delivers.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Haven't we seen this already?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The problem with all the time-travel high jinks, involving multiple versions of the major characters (a gimmick that Robert Heinlein handled much better in stories like “By His Bootstraps” and “All You Zombies—”), is that in order to make the plot even semiintelligible, writer Bob Gale and director-cowriter Robert Zemeckis have to turn all these characters into strident geeks and make the frenetic action strictly formulaic.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The filmmakers treat all the characters, not to mention the audience, as sitcom puppets.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Fairly strong on period atmospherics, but it mainly adds up to yet another pointless adaptation of a literary standby.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    At least the special effects and outer space vistas are more handsome than usual.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film gets campier by the minute.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As an action thriller with music by Isaac Hayes it's not bad.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    While billed as a romance and a thriller, the film strictly qualifies as neither, appealing to our prurience, guilt, hatred, and dread.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Tim Burton's new movie is gorgeous -- shot by shot it may be the most impressive thing he's done.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Seems perfectly timed to coincide with the ascension to office of George W. Bush. It's a clunky effort Bush could have written and directed.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Moderately watchable but awfully predictable.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's a mechanical desire to work in as many outlandish twists as possible, and shallow grotesquerie quickly takes over.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The main problem here is the gross inferiority of the new version to the old: compare Tracy's handling of the opening monologue with Martin's and you'll get a fair indication of what's become of commercial filmmaking over the past four decades.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Teen romance and operetta-style singing replace the horror elements familiar to moviegoers, and director Joel Schumacher obscures any remnants of classy stage spectacle with the same disco overkill he brought to "Batman Forever."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The sensibility is Southern California Witless, and the jokey intertitles that periodically take up half the 'Scope frames ("This is a comedy. Sort of.") are even more smarmy than the characters.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This has its moments, but most of these are engulfed by the overall murk.

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