Joshua Rothkopf

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For 887 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Dogtooth
Lowest review score: 20 The Canyons
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 51 out of 887
887 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Redford, already a giant, has never been more suggestive. His character’s misadventure — might be a kind of cosmic penance. It’s the salvation of the moviegoing year.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Co-writers, co-directors and brothers Alex and Andrew J. Smith—who outdo The Revenant for sincerity, depth and gorgeousness—mount their tale with enough confidence to cut away from the action.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    We are in the presence of a new classic.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    An epic, often funny testament to creative fearlessness.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Defiantly intellectual, complex and true to the shifting winds of real-world governance, Lincoln is not the movie that this election season has earned-but one that a more perfect union can aspire to.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Rare is the profile that captures so much oddness with so little judgment. You owe yourself a chance to be challenged.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The grandeur of this movie is off the charts. For a certain kind of old-school film fan, someone who believes in shapely, classical proportions and an epic yarn told over time, it will be the revelation of the year.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The details are gripping, presented with respect for an audience's intelligence.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Funny and heartbreaking, this is a movie that would have made the '80s-era Jonathan Demme, attuned to American anxieties, blush with pride.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Much of the movie’s revolutionary impact should be credited to the city itself: The Dakota looms menacingly, every bit the Gothic pile as any Transylvanian vampire’s mansion.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Matthew McConaughey finally locates his perfect métier as the town's Fordian skeptic, a district attorney who smells a rat.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Like the wood-grained farmhouse itself — a beautiful piece of production design by Julie Berghoff — The Conjuring has an analog solidity that makes the terror to come almost unbearable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The beauty of this movie, both a nostalgic romp and a futuristic scream, is its stubborn insistence on getting all the trapped-in-amber details right.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Though it runs an epic five-and-a-half hours (it was made for French TV), Carlos books like no film since "Goodfellas." You will not be bored, ever.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Moonlight takes the pain of growing up and turns it into hardened scars and private caresses. This film is, without a doubt, the reason we go to the movies: to understand, to come closer, to ache, hopefully with another.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    By allowing viewers to step into the shoes of a wall-climbing Jackie Chan, a parkour-sprinting Daniel Craig or a bullet-spraying Ahnold, it does something that live action has never attempted before. The carnage flies—it’s possible to miss a lot of it. But if action movies are meant to be stunning, Hardcore Henry can proudly take its place among the giants. Even better, it lets you stand with them.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Wheatley, underplaying his stylishness, goes for a subtle national satire about geeks gone wild, and that’s the fun here: On as mild-mannered a vacation as two Brits might devise, a killer comes along—and, after a while, is politely welcomed in, the kettle simmering.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The tunes, flooding every frame, remain perfect.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Polley has gone further into the thorny subject of forgiveness than any of her peers. Her movies ache with ethical quandary; Stories We Tell aches the most.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    On purely formal grounds (the ones on which the genre lives or dies), Kent is a natural. She favors crisp compositions and unfussy editing, transforming the banal house itself into a subtle, shadowy threat.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Unshakable, witty and deeply felt, the film will be paying emotional dividends for a long, long time.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Masterfully addressing the American racial divide, past and present, director Raoul Peck’s six-years-in-the-making documentary, I Am Not Your Negro, is a galvanizing, ominous film, thrumming with a sense of history repeating itself.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    It Comes at Night is a film of tense gradations, a chamber piece set at the twilight of humanity.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movement of the story—from wrenching homesickness to blooming confidence and a smile on one’s stroll to work—elevates the movie into universal urban poetry.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Too few films take on the art of arguing as a subject; we could certainly use more of them, but until then, Lumet’s window into strained civic duty will continue to serve mightily.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Here's where it's easiest to see Clouzot's advantage over his more famous peer, as he combines nail-biting action scenes - calibrated to the millimeter - with a Hawksian command of earthy performances.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    To watch Bigelow’s expertly calibrated chaos during the riots’ escalation – nothing short of block-by-block guerilla warfare – is to witness something depressingly familiar to anyone who has seen the videos of today’s police brutality, of violently botched arrests and furious community responses, and worried that it would never get better.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    A superior work of confrontational boldness, it might be the movie Oppenheimer wanted to make in the first place.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Andersen makes humorous hay out of the stark home designs of Richard Neutra — only suitable, it seems, for drug dealers.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    World on a Wire is the discovery of the season, rarely screened in America but very much a key chapter in Fassbinder's story--a step toward bigger budgets and slicker production values, yet clarifying of his core artistic legacy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Rarely leaning on the weepy families back home, this briskly paced triumph maintains a clear focus on human costs, with hope slipping away onboard while lives hang on the burp of a fax machine.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie toggles between two periods-before and after a catastrophe-and, were it not for Swinton's magnetism, it would be unbearable. Instead, you'll want to stay for the wallop.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    This film leaves you with the thrill of a good fight fought hard. It’s a scrappy, absorbing tribute to the pragmatic value of compromise, carefully proffered in pursuit of a greater good. America’s candidates would do well to take a page out of this doc’s book.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Stunning, eerily atmospheric.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Particle Fever is that rare, exhilarating science doc that’s neither dumbed down nor drabbed up.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    A staggering political drama that could put you in mind of the intimate sweep of Bernardo Bertolucci, Incendies feels like a mighty movie in our midst.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The auteur’s style — dramatic zooms, winking symmetry — is balanced against a newfound political context; this one’s his "To Be or Not to Be."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s real Streetcar Named Desire territory as the fights pile up, and if you think that doesn’t sound entertaining, know that it is, in a hypnotically catastrophic way.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    A classically structured rampage that bears serious comparison to the definitive greats of Akira Kurosawa, 13 Assassins will floor connoisseurs of action, mood and the dignity of a pissed-off scowl.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Sprung from a 1982 French graphic novel and bearing its era’s trickle-down tensions, Snowpiercer is a headlong rush into conceptual lunacy — but you’ll love it anyway.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    You must see Oklahoma City, if only to know the enemy. They’re not stuck at the airport.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    To say Lonergan has evolved further with his third feature would be an understatement: He toggles between his new plot’s years with the relaxed mastery of Boyhood’s Richard Linklater. Plus, he’s finally got a complex central performance that anchors his ambitions to cinema’s all-time great brooders.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director Showalter does a beautiful job of twining Nanjiani and Romano’s similar slump — you smile at what a perfect almost-father and son they already are — and he steers Hunter to a rapprochement of uncommon complexity and grace. And we thought we were watching a Judd Apatow film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Sly and suggestive, Lourdes is a cosmic black comedy that bumps up against the metaphysical.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Call Me by Your Name has a choking emotional intensity that will be apparent to anyone who’s ever dared to reach out to another.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Thus comes My Perestroika's most sophisticated idea: Day-to-day family struggles have a way of trumping even the most profound political change. Don't miss this.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Drive feels like some kind of masterpiece - it's as pure a version of the essentials as you're likely to see.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    [Russ] Meyer could never make a psychodrama as sophisticated as Biller has now.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    A film about the importance of cultural history and truth (two things deeply under siege these days), Wiseman’s epic Ex Libris might make you cry with happiness; it’s the good fight being fought. Movies aren’t usually a public benefit, much less an essential one. Here’s the exception.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The drama it might remind you most of, oddly enough, is "Six Degrees of Separation," also about the snowballing connections between unlikely people. And as in that urban clash, the bedrock of it all is social responsibility, ever crumbling and rebuilding. A total triumph.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    As for that famous last line, “Well, nobody’s perfect,” it’s best left uncontextualized for those who haven’t seen it. It’s Hollywood’s subtlest moment of compassion, a wink and a hug at the same time, and the reason why the movie will always be immortal.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's more like confession, the director still seething and replaying Vertigo in his head, lost in the curves of his career. De Palma is a public therapy session that upturns all expectations.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Carné's film has never looked more lush.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    As brightly alive a movie as the season will offer.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The true value of the film is universal: These kids study the knotty viral science, pressure doctors into taking daring, inventive steps and make their cause a global emblem.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Paradoxically, this is not a tale about summoning inner strength, but about shedding pride. Sometimes, there's no choice.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    No
    The essential thrust here is both knowing and undeniable: No is pitched at the pivot point when the image makers were brazen enough to push ideology to the side. Considering how high the stakes were, it’s amazing they almost didn’t get the gig.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Is Joaquin Phoenix putting us on? After watching the terrifying, near-brilliant exposé I'm Still Here, in which the Oscar nominee's public and private unraveling becomes a sick joke, the question doesn't matter.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    It may be time to stop calling Nicolas Roeg's sexed-up sci-fi film that vaguely demeaning term - a cult classic - and start addressing it as what it is: the most intellectually provocative genre film of the 1970s.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's a hypnotically perverse film, one that redeems your faith in studio smarts (but not, alas, in local law enforcement, tabloid crime reporting or, indeed, marriage).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film isn’t heavy on earth science, yet these orange-tinted tide pools and shuddering protomammals indicate a strain of serious research. The world is a miracle and a gift in the movie’s eyes; it would be no small thing if audiences left with the same sense of wonderment.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    This is a drama about finding one's self-worth; you simply have to see it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    How perfectly perverse: In a summer crammed with sequels, remakes, '80s nostalgia and the frustrated sense of "What else y'got?" comes the most original nightmare in years.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    A dynamite crime comedy and identity meltdown that can rekindle one’s faith in movies.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The best style has a purpose to it, and Russian Ark, in its hypnotic, endless swirl, gets at a deep truth of the post-Soviet psyche, haunted by its legacy of czarist rule and Stalin-era sacrifice. The film is a sad home for ghosts.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Scorsese has hit the rare heights of Ingmar Bergman and Carl Theodor Dreyer, artists who found in religion a battleground that often left the strongest in tatters, compromised and ruined. It’s a movie desperately needed at a moment when bluster must yield to self-reflection.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Love Is Strange emerges as a total triumph for Sachs and his co-leads, John Lithgow and Alfred Molina, who, despite lengthy filmographies, turn in career-topping work. a sensitive domestic tragedy about the finite nature of any union.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    A hilarious, deeply relaxed comedy about male bonding, Richard Linklater’s baseball-minded latest ranks right up there with his masterpieces.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Starring a tough-minded band of scrappy teens who actually do some solving, it's the movie "Super 8" wanted to be - or should have been.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Jackie pummels you with grandeur, with its epic visions of the funeral and that terrible moment in the convertible (all of it rendered in pitch-perfect detail and a subtle 16-millimeter shudder). Yet the film's lasting impact is dazzlingly intellectual: Just as JFK himself turned politics into image-making, his wife continued his work when no one else could.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Gilroy, vastly supported by cinematographer and Los Angeles specialist Robert Elswit (Boogie Nights, Magnolia), directs with the verve of a seasoned pro, even though Nightcrawler is his debut.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The pleasures are right in your face, beginning with the million-dollar idea of turning NYC into a walled-off prison where criminals run free. Even born-and-raised New Yorkers (of which Carpenter was decidedly not) could smile at that histrionic setup; it’s an outsider’s joke made funny by our willingness to be entertained.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Frank Pavich’s fun documentary captures an unbowed, exuberant Jodorowsky, who recalls his team of “spiritual warriors” with the camaraderie of a battle-scarred veteran.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Either via clay dolls or fragile flesh, the truth is unmissable—as is Panh’s film itself.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    That’s the subtle level this movie operates on, and by the time it arrives at its powerhouse climax, a ruinous argument in a hotel room where all lingering doubts are finally and furiously outed, there’s nowhere left for them to ramble. They’re pinned down and have to improvise, but this glorious movie has infinite space to roam.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Quietly, though, this amuse-bouche of a setup (culled from six episodes of BBC television) blooms into a meal of majestic agony. Coogan and Brydon's competitive bursts of celebrity impressions - Michael Caine comes in for special attention - take on a tone of clingy desperation, as does their jockeying for status in taunts of love, marriage and career.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    An aggressively unpleasant man somehow lands a perfect series of gigs in this rudely funny documentary: first as a pounding rock drummer who revolutionized the field; then as a fearless, rage-filled polo player; and finally as an impatient interviewee.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    That rarest of art documentaries, one that actually leaves viewers with a better sense of the gifted versus the phony.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The rollicking, space-opera spirit of George Lucas’s original trilogy (you can safely forget the second trio of cynical, tricked-up prequels) emanates from every frame of J.J. Abrams' euphoric sequel. It’s also got an infusion of modern-day humor that sometimes steers the movie this close to self-parody—but never sarcastically, nor at the expense of a terrific time.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    But mainly, it’s the film’s folk music that roots in the heart like a faraway lure.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The acting, especially from Menash Noy as an ineffectual attorney, is phenomenal, resulting in a feminist knockout told in inverse.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Blue Valentine has a quiet, resigned wisdom to it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Shockingly modern and the most politically enlightened (and enlightening) comedy of the 1930s, Leo McCarey's winning quasi-Western is a model of Hollywood broad strokes coalescing into a sophisticated whole.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    As gritty as Heaven Knows What often feels, it’s leavened by empathy and poetic moments: desperate kisses, a passed-out couch nap lit by slanting sunbeams, the beautifully eerie synth music of Tomita. This isn’t an easy watch, but it validates every risk we want our most emboldened filmmakers to take.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Why do we care? Because never before have the steps to thugdom, as depressing as that destination may be, been so rigorously detailed, neither romanticized nor negated. Don’t miss.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    If you can stomach the fear, go. Confident hands created this film. Its nightmare lingers for weeks.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie is a coming-of-age story, but whose age is coming? That's the profound question we're left with, in a stellar adaptation that balances gore with black humor, ethical quandary, hope and—yes—plenty of brains.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film plays like a better episode of "Mad Men," pitch-perfect in its details yet fully lived-in: a universe of rolled-up shirt sleeves, sweat-laden brows and screams that don’t sound canned.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    This one’s a crucible of sweaty pre-natal panic, weird knocks at the door, mind games and ultimately, a roaring, miniature apocalypse set inside a single claustrophobic living room. If that already sounds like your home, it's time to go and give it a try.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The most gratifying thing about the film is feeling Moodysson’s warmth return to him.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's a grandly entertaining reminder of everything we used to go to the movies for (and still can't get online): sparkling dialogue, thorny situations, soulful performances, and an unusually open-ended and relevant engagement with a major social issue of the day: how we (dis)connect.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Voyage to Italy is the kind of movie that makes those unhappily in love feel understood. And even if that’s not you (congratulations), it’s still possible to groove on Rossellini’s stranger-in-a-strange-land psychodrama.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Phenomenally sad yet exhilarating.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    There’s a quiet fury to Johnny Guitar, best embodied by Mercedes McCambridge’s vicious Emma, who wants to drive Vienna out of town. It’s a film that climaxes with a gunfight between two women, while the men hide behind tree stumps.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    The final Harry Potter movie, above all others, supplies Radcliffe with the gravitas of not just an epic story come to completion, but some real dramatic heft. Not so bad for a Hogwarts dropout.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    In lesser hands, this could have easily been some seriously detestable John Wayne jingoism. But via Fiennes, the film is a spiky and complex counterweight to Hollywood sentiment and indie cynicism alike.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Again, Granik has foregrounded a bold woman, expertly balanced between fearlessness and Ree's own private nervousness.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Of all the things to be nostalgic about, warfare would seem the least likely candidate, but that's the unusual perspective of this one-of-a-kind 1943 landmark - maybe the most wonderfully British movie ever made.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Amer could exist only as a movie, not as a novel or a pop song. If you give it a whirl, you won't simply get drunk on its immediacy; you may throw out plot and character altogether.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    See this film immediately.

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