Joshua Rothkopf
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For 699 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem
Lowest review score: 20 Antichrist
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 699
699 movie reviews
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie has a centerfold sheen to it--and some lesbianic soft-core flirtation to match--as its plot dives deeply into "Twilight"-esque heavy-melo meltdown in the last act. Cody throws one too many losses at Needy; the screenwriter loses her satiric way about halfway through. But for a while, this has real fangs.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Love Crime soon plummets into a flashback-laden mess, a shame since it was marginally stronger as a psychosexual game of dominance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The esteemed director, Ken Loach, isn’t really a fantasist--and it shows.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The funny thing? It all works reasonably well, especially if you have a yen for the urbane register of city kids and their amazingly cool parents.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    There's too much going on here - of a winning, thoughtful nature - to dismiss Josh Radnor's back-to-college romance as the nostalgia bath it mainly is.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Too many digital effects ruin the spell of a tactile world of evil objects scheming your demise. But even a mediocre FD is better than more Jigsaw.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Tuschi leans too far into an admiring position, and you thirst for some commonsense critique. It's all a bit rich.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Al Pacino’s done so much Acting over the last 25 years (hoo-ah), it’s disquieting to see him digging deep again—often with subtlety—into a rich role with hidden depths.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    As brought to life in the stentorian tones of Ben Kingsley, the curator comes off like a driven visionary, but his actual efforts aren't dramatized enough. The paintings speak more articulately: doomy, dank colors and oppressive shapes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Breathtaking imagery competes with a scary lack of human interest in this hypnotic, potentially alienating documentary.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Weaknesses from the original remain, including a mustache-twirling villain straight out of a Bond film (Sharlto Copley) and a Freudian master plan that unravels the more you think about it. Give credit to Lee for staying fresh, even if this feels like slumming.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Simply skip the first part entirely: "Killer Instinct" bulges with a disconnected jumble of nightclub attacks and fence-clipping escapes you've seen better elsewhere. Yet a tide change happens with the superior Public Enemy No. 1, which takes the subject's raging ego as its cue.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    It exists in fits and starts: a Blade Runner–esque moment of rainy contemplation on a hotel balcony; some weird sexual tension with a lizard girl (statuesque Svetlana Khodchenkova) who steals away Wolverine’s healing powers.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Now, with this underwhelming sequel, Spain proves it can stand toe to toe with any nation in the manufacture of unnecessary follow-ups.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film wants to be inspiring, when it might have been cosmic-a far greater ambition. Tossing boats and dreamers, the huge waves perform beautifully.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    LaMarque foregrounds her scenario’s awkwardness—it never quite feels like a comedy—and the pair of male suitors she brings in (Jake Johnson and Ron Livingston) are, refreshingly, as unfixed as her main character. But you still wish Kazan had more to work with.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Unknown is probably the movie "The Tourist" wanted to be, if it had a pulse. Its sheer momentum makes Neeson and Kruger more attractive than even Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Based on a banned short story from the 1920s, Caterpillar might be read as a reaction to hawkish nationalism, but it's more a cry for the unknown soldier in the kitchen and bedroom.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    It probably would have helped if Walker (who credits two other codirectors) had chosen just one of those avenues for deeper study; her doc has a vertiginous way of feeling arty and ephemeral at one moment, humane and maybe too earthbound the next.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The sincere director, Oliver Schmitz, injects too much movie into his movie; life (above all) would have been enough.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Even though Unfriended begins to cheat, springing loud noises and gory cutaways that can’t be explained, there’s a rigor to its dopey, blood-simple conception that you might smile at.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    None of this is particularly well wrought, and only a bizarre gas mask worn by the séance leader counts as an inspired (if slightly silly) touch.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    While Transcendence has tons of money to spend on unpersuasive digital effects and dronelike music, it shows little interest in exploring the potentially tricky benefits of a computer-enhanced intellect; it’s not even in the enjoyable realm of starkly ridiculous Cold War thrillers like "Colossus: The Forbin" Project.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director Peter Webber, who once mined social unease from the painterly "Girl with a Pearl Earring," is out of his depth; this is a movie in desperate need of a no-nonsense Howard Hawks.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Admission’s comedy has walls built around it; director Paul Weitz (About a Boy), normally a softener of harsh edges, might have been stymied by Fey’s snappy persona.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    A new Red Dawn could have been so much more fun had it thrown a properly out-of-bounds tea party. (It lacks the signature brawn of original director John Milius, a guns-first libertarian.)
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Like all advertisements, this scripted movie is a perfect fantasy: expertly coordinated, simplistic (the bad guys like yachts and bikini girls while our heroes have loving families) and more than a little scary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    You doubt Wiseman's sense of pacing. Still, he must have had a good time shooting.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Only Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani, directors of 2009’s stylish Amer, emerge intact with “O Is for Orgasm,” a surging montage of fluid colors and moans.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    To the movie's small credit, there's very little grasping for larger significance: It's a dumb horror film, complete with a sexy female lust object (Kaboom's Mesquida) undraping for a shower scene.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film plays like something Boyle could kick out in his sleep, all his supercool devices listlessly deployed in service of a mediocre wet dream.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Shockingly dull.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Filmed with the somber pretentiousness of a "Babel," the movie never quite converts its premise into something grander (never mind believable). Meanwhile, the world starts to riot, yet their bed is warm. Will love save the day? Unfortunately for us, our sense of smell remains intact.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    This is the ultimate sin of the film, generically helmed by lad-auteur Guy Ritchie: Logic seems to be thrown out the window in order to make room for clashes on a partially completed Tower Bridge. It’s way too elementary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's too bad V/H/S starts off on such a high note. Mainly, the omnibus film feels undercooked, even on the grounds of its forced technological setup.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    For a movie with a critique of mediocrity well within its grasp, this one settles for an embrace of it, barely breaking a sweat.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The whole movie feels like a case of the sweats, putting you in desperate need of the chicken soup of recognizable human behavior.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    A soundtrack of churning rock songs by the Kills is as close as this misfire gets to authentic grrrl power, borrowed as it is.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    What was Clint thinking? (Or Martin Scorsese, when he made "Shutter Island," for that matter.)
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    One would be better off experiencing Woodley via her heartbreaking turn in last year's "The Spectacular Now," a drama that actually has more to say about nightmarish cliques and individuality than any lackadaisical slide into future schlock.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The set pieces are grand—gloriously dumb and never realistic enough to make you wince at the fact that billions of microscopic souls are dying before your eyes. Rather, you wince at everything else.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Fresnadillo, working with screenwriters Nicolás Casariego and Jaime Marques, might be angling for the same YA fantasy as "Pan's Labyrinth," but they've forgotten about that film's violent underpinnings, a mistake that leaches their movie of suspense.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie leans on symbolic imagery that’s alternately tired and ridiculous: Hunt’s impatiently flicked cigarette lighter (yes, he’s a candle waiting to be lit) or a black-widow spider crawling up the stands of one particularly dangerous course. These are classic frenemies; their tale deserves more gas in the tank.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s made with too much slickness, and you’ll be way ahead of it.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The first Reitman film to make the 36-year-old director seem about 400 years old.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie is one big scream, clichéd and hardly credible as an oblique call to civility.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    There are sparks here that suggest the smarter movie a more scientifically minded director--say, David Cronenberg--might have made.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Even on its own limited, rigorous aesthetic grounds, there are far superior movies (including all of Tarr's own work). It's a sad way for the 56-year-old to go out, almost a caricature of his funereal mood and of art cinema in general.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The hard fact, though, is that Harlin's instincts - always toward the massive and slo-mo - make him a fairly dunderheaded political analyst.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Close to a parody of a French sex drama - complete with bored, bourgie bed-swappers and a dull sense of amoral sophistication - this autopiloted import does no favors to the legacies of Truffaut and Godard.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    When Mark Ruffalo shows up as a crumpled detective, you expect a dose of reality, yet on his heels come twin hams Michael Caine and Morgan Freeman, whose solemn presences (as Christopher Nolan knows well) prove wonderful distractions from silliness.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The original film, for all its zaniness, existed in a recognizable Koch-era metropolis, one that paradoxically added to our hero's likable haze of denial. This time, the town is far shinier (what recession?).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Closer to a special episode of "Diff’rent Strokes" than to "12 Years a Slave," the movie seems to exist to give its white characters belated moments of conscience.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    While the movie isn't "Witness," you know that comic scenes of target practice are going to make sense around the bend.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Queens-born horror specialist Stevan Mena has mastered the slow camera creep and the unusually artful vista-he even composes his own orchestral scores, good ones. But he needs to give up screenwriting, pronto. Put down the laptop, Stevan.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    How does one remain an unapologetic fan of Vaughn, abrasive though he is, even as his material fails him?
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film lacks any kind of human interest, relying instead on our inferred love of lengthy strategy sessions and displays of ruffled pride. When it comes to yakuza cinema, you can do better.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Neither as subversively fun as last year’s megadestructive "Project X," nor as creative as "The Hangover" (on which these codirectors broke through as screenwriters), this further installment in the millennials-acting-badly genre serves as a distinctly average placeholder.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    All of them slog through countless boring sword-and-sandal skirmishes, none of which feel remotely suspenseful, until the hugeness of it all becomes a mildly passable joke.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The filmmakers are too much in love with their made-up holiday to observe it to the fullest.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    In theory, there's nothing wrong when a movie reminds you of TV. (That's where the fun is, anyway.) But when a movie resembles a long-lost, corduroy-clad episode of "The Rockford Files," that's a problem.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Just as you're reeling from the tackiness of this premise, set within such an explosive context, the plot doubles down on it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    An unfocused comedy about weird Army pseudoscience, ends up blinking before we laugh.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cutesy and generic, New York, I Love You is almost colossally inept at capturing five-boroughs flavor.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The Losers is the ultimate example, scraped from the bottom of the comic-book barrel, where writer Andy Diggle’s figurine-like characters first had their exploits in an exciting War on Terror.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    My Best Enemy bleeds suspense like a pin-pricked tire. It wants to be clever, but survivor tales bring with them too much muck.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Brief yet underdeveloped, Interior. Leather Bar. has a faux-documentary vibe about it.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The new movie is simpler plotwise (a race to the Fountain of Youth), while at the same time being somehow more deadening.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The main flaw — twirling farm girls and grunting oxen aside — is an utter lack of insight into the future leader’s character.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    An eerie resurrection regains some good will, but we'll have to wait for Neshat to catch up with the art of storytelling.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Better to defrost "Alive" or "The Edge" from the video icebox.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Green was meant for quick-witted comedy. Unfortunately, she's becoming a mainstay of painfully sincere slogs.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film is set in a celeb-owned Miami restaurant and many of the gags--exploding entrees, the swallowing of a diamond ring, on-the-job drunkenness--feel like leftovers.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie sags after Mary’s weak-willed acquiescence to crime, instantly turning her into a dull-eyed monster. You know her procedures are bound to stray from elective, but it’s hard to care.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The casting is spectacularly wrong, and even on its own scant merits, writer-director Lorene Scafaria's screenplay has little insight into apocalyptic licentiousness, barring a tart line or two.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Centrally, the title character remains an impressive piece of propwork, and Leonetti's restraint in never animating it (à la Chucky) is the only thing worth appreciating here.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Marvel at the desperate spectacle of three comic leads-Aniston, Bateman and Watchmen's Patrick Wilson as the original donor-being outperformed by the wide-eyed Robinson, a quiet collector of silences. These stars will never be as young as he is; you wish they'd all stop trying.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The better actors — Kevin Costner, chiefly, as the adoptive Earth father — strain to supply warmth, but mostly, the minutes stretch into great expanses of blahness, much of them filled with Transformers-grade skyscraper snapping and bloodless catastrophe.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    A typically lax late-period Ferrara work, far from the glories of "King of New York."
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Depending on what you need from this movie, there's slight redemption in its full-on commitment to raunch, both in baby-shit–to-mouth scatology and some choice zingers.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Let's not make 4:44 Last Day on Earth sound cooler than it is. Compared with Lars von Trier's histrionically doomed "Melancholia," the film lacks any serious attempt to grapple with mortality.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Ultimately, for all its running around in the middle of the night, Sex Tape plays it remarkably coy, reaffirming love, not lust. It’s the cinematic equivalent of sleeping in the wet spot.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Once you get over the droll joke of seeing an equine Web surfer wearing a bathrobe and sipping his morning coffee, the movie settles into a shrill groove from which it never escapes.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Some will find the director’s toothless brand of epiphany comforting (and download his mixtape), but the vast majority will find it tired.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    What's the word on the film debut of Rihanna, playing a sass-mouthed petty officer? Dreadful (ella, ella).
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    A perfectly boring movie from Julian Schnabel - is it possible?
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Breillat, as always, goes her own way, but her impressionistic scenes barely cohere, even at this brief running time.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    There's nothing strictly wrong with any of this, except for the fact that even a buttoned-down period piece like "Topsy-Turvy" feels sexier.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Where the book had a kernel of intellectual irony to it — words betray a nation — this drama goes shamelessly for the heart.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Material like this doesn't require the additional strain of overnarrated freeze-frames, a "Cuckoo's Nest" supporting cast of adorable crazies and a Glee-ified musical number set to Queen and David Bowie's "Under Pressure."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Diced into hash, the action sequences are unusually painful: poundingly loud and punctuated by Liam Neeson's bark, Bradley Cooper's manic heehawing and a total lack of clarity.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Judging from Sánchez's Lovely Molly, he'd like to get lost in the trees again, but now knows the path too well.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The predictability is crushing, and with movies like "Crazy Heart" and Sofia Coppola's distinctly personal "Somewhere" so close in the rearview, David M. Rosenthal's estrangement drama feels especially soft.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    In our chatty "Game of Thrones" moment, you'll thirst for a sidekick: a sly dwarf, a wisecracking female warrior, a huggable wolf, anything. Solomon Kane has none of these, and even heavyweight speechifiers like Max von Sydow and the late Pete Postlethwaite (that's how old the film is) have little to gnaw on.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Still Life constantly threatens to become a better movie: John’s scrutiny of photos feels vaguely serial-killer–esque, and there’s a late-inning love interest (Downton Abbey’s Joanne Froggatt) that you privately cheer for.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film will do until "Fifty Shades of Grey" turns up. The more you think about Labor Day, the more calculating it gets.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The whole film seems dead set against offering up any kind of salaciousness. Like the overly arty "Zoo" and other indie experiments, it misses the point in a disturbing way.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The director has made disappointing films before — a more generous word might be transitional — but never one so slight.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The young actors' vacant-eyed brazenness may be true to life, but there's a whiff of exploitation, matched by the script's disinterest in exploring any friction that isn't skin on skin.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Listen to the rhythms of "Broadcast News" - from Holly Hunter's daily crying jags to William Hurt's cock-of-the walk patter - and you'll hear how romantic comedy can approach an art form, a roundelay that requires the ear of a conductor. How Do You Know, James L. Brooks's latest, has such tone-deaf passages that it feels made by a totally different man.

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