Joshua Rothkopf

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For 716 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Love Is Strange
Lowest review score: 20 The Canyons
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 46 out of 716
716 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Writer-director Laura Colella hasn’t strayed far from home (these characters are her actual housemates, rechristened into fiction), but her project feels like a casual experiment gone wonderfully right.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    As presented here (cut down from a longer edit), the film might have benefitted from more technical context related to the plant’s failure — this is a cautionary tale worth heeding. But the voices are valuable enough.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie deepens as Nelly, destined for the gossip columns and a peripheral attachment, becomes painfully aware of her own fragility (Jones’s performance is devastating).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Even if you’re not boned up on your classic Ozu family tragedies, see it before Spielberg does his remake.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Whiplash scrapes the far edge of crazy passion. It never apologizes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    No other filmmaker on the planet can touch Evans for long-take beatdowns and wildly inventive flourishes.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Ruffalo, a master of rumpled befuddlement, finds his signature role here—it can't be overstated how deftly he eases into the tricky creation, a blue-blooded slacker who aches when the world won't hug him back.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The real richness of the movie, though, comes well in, as the improvised script gets around to deeper anxieties of aging and avoidance.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Unusually moving (not only to stray film critics in your crowd), director Steve James's keen profile of the late, great Roger Ebert works both as a compact appreciation of the reviewer's vast public impact, as well as an unflinching peak into a cancer patient's final months, fraught with pain, hope and constant treatment.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Lanzmann’s feisty exchanges with Murmelstein, a brilliant talker, become an emotional symbol for the pursuit of slippery truth, while the filmmaker’s recently shot footage of Yom Kippur services show a way of life in robust continuation.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cry foul, you documentary purists, but narration by Jena Malone and others pulls the gamble off. The film makes its point ingeniously.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Make room for the modest but affecting pleasures of veteran actors tearing into the subject of golden-years resignation.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    This installment delivers a heavy and welcome dose of paranoia, administered between fleetly paced smackdowns.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    None of this is pushed into comic relief—the filmmaker lets his drama play out with gentleness — and you smile at the many evolutions.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director Samantha Grant scores an interview with Blair himself, whose too-little-too-late admissions (along with his reemergence as a postguilt life coach) might drive your crowd to hisses.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Turturro, writing and directing in a register light-years from his nebbishy turn in "Barton Fink," has a more sensual NYC indie in mind.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    A full-bodied and mischievous autobiography in the spirit of Federico Fellini’s "Amarcord," Alejandro Jodorowsky’s return to filmmaking after 28 years of financial frustration explodes with great ideas.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s a portrait that’s equal parts shtick and soul — in other words, exactly what "The Love Guru" should have been.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The documentary is strongest during these conference-room brainstorms, similar to those of a political campaign. (It could have used more of Boies’s witness-demolishing courtroom eloquence.) The draw here is watching a careful process unfold, regardless of the outcome.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Though supported by Woodley’s subtle narration, The Fault in Our Stars is relentlessly outward. That’s part of the book’s inspiring touch, and even if some of the supporting cast comes off as merely functional onscreen, the core of the tragedy comes to life in a heartbreaking way.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s a movie about coming to peace with solitude, leagues beyond most biopics.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    You feel for the potential Wesleyan parent who asks an administrator if his daughter is going to have to move home after graduating: His question is met with an uneasy pause. Crucial stuff.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    This is still one of his (Berlinger) most ambitious films, vibrating with the same municipal unease as "Chinatown."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Land Ho! avoids schmaltz to get at that rarest of male timber: rekindled hearts.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    So much of Get on Up is uncannily perfect, from its nightmarish Georgia childhood flashbacks to delirious concert re-creations and the casting of Blues Brother Dan Aykroyd as Brown’s longtime manager.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    For all its eye-opening material, The Dog still feels unfinished, but for students of New York scuzziness, it’s an essential addition.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    In its early scenes, Dinosaur 13 works nearly as well as a certain Steven Spielberg thriller, creating the giddy, ominous mood of past and present colliding in excitement.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Such is Kim’s plotty momentum that the whole thing feels like an extreme joke made of pained silences, one that somehow strips bare the subtext of overbearing parents. Meryl Streep herself couldn’t improve on it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Indeed, the doc works best as a relationship study, filled with endearing moments of intimate bickering. Takei is a self-admitted ham but a playful one, projecting his confidence in increasingly meaningful directions.

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